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Medical Physics

web_BMH007Ranjith Wijesinghe and his students are working in two research areas. One area is the study of the electrical and magnetic properties of propagating action signals in nerve and muscle bundles. We employ unique toroidal pickup coils to detect magnetic fields arising from nerve and muscle bundles.

Unlike conventional electrodes, these pickup coils can be used to measure action signals non-invasively. Therefore, this technique does not impair living tissues when the measurements are made and also does not contaminate the tissues. Most importantly, the measured signals contain less noise than that of signals measured using conventional electrodes. We are also working on the mathematical modeling of EEG and MEG signals.

Muhammad Maqbool and his students work in two research areas. In one area they investigate various properties like attenuation coefficient, build-up factor and transfer functions of tissue compensators, and other alloys for radiation oncology and radiation shielding and protection.

In the other area called biophotonics, infrared (IR) emission from materials is studied for cancer detection. Enhancement in the IR emission is under investigation to further improve cancer detection. Visible emission from materials is used for the study of stopping power used in health physics. Work is also in progress to use gadolinium and other ultraviolet emitters to construct new radiation detectors and use them in cancer detection.
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Ball State University
Cooper Physical Science Building, room 101
Muncie, IN 47306

Hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday (Summer Hours: 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.)
Phone: 765-285-8860
Fax: 765-285-5674
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