Undergraduate Course Catalog

Technology

S. CottonChairperson  

Preparing students for challenging careers in business, industry, and teaching is the major focus of the Department of Technology. Bachelor’s degree programs in computer technology, construction management, graphic arts management, industry and technology, and technology and engineering teacher education prepare students for a broad range of careers in selected disciplines. Computer technology, construction management, and graphic arts management programs also include a minor in Business Administration.        

Internship programs are available in the computer technology, construction management, and graphic arts management programs and are arranged in a wide variety of businesses and industries for students seeking firsthand experience in the day-to-day operations of contemporary organizations. Qualified students enrolled in bachelor’s degree programs in the Department of Technology may choose internship programs after completing the freshman year of study. Students arrange positions through the internship coordinator.        

The teaching major in technology and engineering education program is accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) (formerly NCATE). The construction management program is accredited by the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE).               

The department’s curricular advisors will assist students in selecting appropriate majors, minors, and courses, and will provide career counseling. An exit assessment must be completed by all majors and minors in the department. 

See Interdepartmental Programs for the minor in Foundations of Computer Systems.


ASSOCIATE DEGREE

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

Purdue University, in cooperation with Ball State University, offers an associate of applied science degree in mechanical engineering technology on the Ball State University campus.     

Mechanical engineering technology concerns the generation, transmission, and use of mechanical and fluid energy and the design and production of tools and machines and their products.     

The program prepares students to become laboratory technicians, engineering aides, plant maintenance persons, layout persons, production assistants, and technical salespersons. With additional experience, graduates may become eligible for such positions as industrial supervisors, machine and tool designers, technical buyers, production expeditors, and cost estimators.     

Students may continue for the bachelor of science degree in mechanical technology at Purdue University in West Lafayette or the bachelor of science degree in computer technology at Ball State University. 

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General education, 27 hours

COMM
CS
ENG
MATH


PHYC

210
120
103
108
112
161
110
112

Fundamentals of Public Comm 
Computer Science 1  
Rhetoric & Writing  
Intermediate Algebra
Precalculus Trigonometry  
Applied Calculus 1  
General Physics 1  
General Physics 2  

3
4
3
3
3
3
4
4

     

27 hrs
Core requirements, 41 hours

PUME










TMFG

104
111
141
142
160
211
213
214
220
230
242
105
307

Industrial Organization  
Applied Statics  
Material and Processes 1  
Material and Processes 2  
Appld Eng Comp Analysis  
Applied Strength of Materials
Dynamics
Machine Elements  
Heat and Power 1  
Fluid Power  
Manufacturing Processes
Technical Design Graphics  
Applied Statics

3
3
3
3
2
4
2
3
3
3
3
3
3

Humanities elective 

3

     

41 hrs
     

68 hrs

BACCALAUREATE DEGREES

Students will be guided by the outline of baccalaureate degrees, the University Core Curriculum, and the concentration areas listed below. 

MAJOR IN COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY, 76 hours

The computer technology program transforms students into technology leaders in a sustainable global economy.  

This is achieved by presenting students with a strong foundation in the concepts, theories, and practices that serve as the basis for the varying aspects of information technology. This includes the design, implementation, and administration of secured systems and networks. Students then have the opportunity to develop expertise in specialty areas of interest through electives in higher level technology courses.  

Since the purpose of information technology is to facilitate the goals and objectives of a business or organization, students are required to complete the Minor in Business Administration. With an understanding of how organizations operate, students will be able to more effectively design systems and networks that will support the needs of the business or organization. 

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Core requirement, 43 hours

CS

MATH 
TCMP








TDPT

110 
120
132
111
210
211
270
310
311
371
465
466
380
390

Intro Comp Sci & Web Prog 
Computer Science 1
Brief Calculus
Computer Assembly Trblshooting
Internetwork Fundamentals
System Admin Fundamentals
Industrial Electronics
Internetwork Design Admin
Infrastructure Services
Machine/Computer Interfacing
Information Security
Capstone Computer Technology
Internship in Technology
Training and Devel in Industry

3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

15 hours from    

TCMP
 








221
321 
330
340
380
400
410
421
430
440
450

Alt Desktop Operating Systems (3) 
Alt Server Operating Systems (3)
Internetwork Switching (3)
Wireless Network Comm (3)
Electronic Communication Admin (3)
Sustainability in Info Tech (3)
Scalable Internetworking (3)
Data Storage Disaster Recovery (3)
Convergent Networks (3)
Directory Services (3)
Ent Infrastructure Design (3)

 









15

Business administration minor, 18 hours   

ISOM 

MGT
MKG

ISOM

125 
251
300
300
or
300

Micro Apps for Business 
Introductory Operations Mgt
Managing Behavior in Org
Principles of Marketing (3)

Project Management (3)

3
3
3


3

6 hours from     

ACC 
ISOM


MGT

MKG


201
135
226
311 
261
341
310
320
325
460

Principles of Accounting 1 (3) 
Business Information Systems (3)
Business Systems App Dev (3)
Info & Enter Sys: Analys/Des (3)
Personnel and Supervision (3)
Opportunity Identification (3)
Consumer Behavior (3)
Advertising Management (3)
Professional Selling (3)
Strategic Supply Chain Mgt (3)

 



6

     

18 hrs
     

76 hrs

MAJOR IN CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT, 96 hours

Students preparing for management positions in the field of construction will complete the program below with a required minor in business administration. The option prepares graduates to become project managers, estimators, project planners, technical trainers, CAD technicians, safety officers, site superintendents, product marketing representatives, and purchasers.   

Two required internship experiences provide students with relevant work experience in the field of construction. 

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ECON
MATH


ECON
PHYC


CHEM
NREM


TCST















TDPT

201
132
181
or
221
110
112
or
111
211
or
221
104
106
180
200
222
250
261
262
300
310
320
355
365
400
420
460
380

Elementary Microeconomics
Brief Calculus
Elementary Probability Stats (3)

Business Statistics (3)
General Physics 1
General Physics 2 (4)

General Chemistry 1 (4)
Water Resources (3)

Soil Resources (3)
Introduction to Construction
CAD for Const Management
Construction Documents
Site Preparation
Technical Presentation
Construction Methods Matls 1
Mechanical Construction
Electrical Construction
Structural Mechanics
Ethics in Construction
Estimating
Planning and Scheduling
Construction Safety
Const Proj Mngmnt
Construction Finance and Law
Capstone in Construction
Internship in Technology (3)

3
3


3
4


4


3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6

TCST technical electives approved by advisor 

7

 

81 hrs

The prerequisite for MATH 132 is a C- or better in MATH 111, or an appropriate score on the SAT/ACT or on the mathematics placement test, or permission of the department chairperson. The prerequisite for ECON 221 is a C or better grade in MATH 111 or a passing grade in MATH 132, 161, 162, 165, or 166. Other prerequisites may be necessary for MATH 111.  

CHEM 111, ECON 201, MATH 132, PHYC 110, and TCST 460 are required as part of the University Core Curriculum.  

Students may elect to take MATH 112, 125, and one additional science course (PHYC 112 or CHEM 112) instead of taking MATH 132 to meet accreditation, university, and program requirements. This election may take more than 120 credit hours for graduation.

Minor in Business Administration for Construction Management, 15 hours

ACC
BL
ISOM
MGT

201
260
251
300

Principles of Accounting 1
Principles of Business Law
Introductory Operations Mgt
Managing Behavior in Org

3
3
3
3

Business elective 

3

     

15 hrs
     

96 hrs
Students may choose the business elective from ACC 202; ECON 202; RE 230; RMI 270; MGT 241, 261; or other business elective as approved by the construction management student advisor.

MAJOR IN GRAPHIC ARTS MANAGEMENT, 82 hours

Students preparing for management positions in the graphic arts industry will complete a departmental major in graphic arts management and a minor in business administration. A required internship gives students experience in the graphic arts industry. Plans for internship credit are arranged with assistance and approval of the program coordinator and internship coordinator, who also supervises the internships. 

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Required technical courses

TGRA









180
181
182
183
184
281
282
286
382
383
387

Introduction to Graphic Arts 
Flexography 
Offset Lithography 1 
Screen Printing 
Comp Applications-Graphic Arts 
Ink and Substrate 
Digital Imaging 1 
Digital Photography 1  
Digital Imaging 2 
Offset Lithographic Presswork 
Digital Photography 2

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Required management courses

TDPT

TGRA




380
390
381 
385 
480 
484
488
489

Internship in Technology  
Training and Devel in Industry  
Quality Control 
Commercial Printing 
Capstone in Graphic Arts  
Printing Management 
Print Estimating Cost Analysis 
Prod Control Printing Ind

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Required Business Administration minor 

18

CHEM ECON  

111
201 

General Chemistry 1  
Elementary Microeconomics 

4
3

     

82 hrs 

MAJOR IN INDUSTRY AND TECHNOLOGY, 32 hours

Courses in industry and technology are elected with the advice of the department chairperson. 

MINOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, 18 hours

Open only to graphics arts management majors except construction management majors (see business minor for construction management majors).

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CR HRS

ISOM

MGT
MKG

ISOM

125
251
300
300
or
300

Micro Apps for Business
Introductory Operations Mgt  
Managing Behavior in Org  
Principles of Marketing (3) 

Project Management (3)

3
3
3


3

6 hours from

ACC
ISOM


MGT

MKG


201
135
226 
311
241
261
310
320
325
460

Principles of Accounting 1 (3) 
Business Information Systems (3)
Business Systems App Dev (3) 
Info & Enter Sys: Analys/Des (3) 
Entrepreneurial Experience (3)
Personnel and Supervision (3)  
Consumer Behavior (3)
Advertising Management (3) 
Professional Selling (3) 
Strategic Supply Chain Mgt (3)

6

     

18 hrs 
ISOM 135 requires demonstrated proficiency in computer skills through examination, credit in ISOM 125 or CS 104. MGT 300 and MKG 300 require sophomore standing (30 hours). MKG 300 requires sophomore standing including ECON 116 or 201.

MINOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION FOR CONSTRUCTION
MANAGEMENT, 15 hours

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CR HRS

ACC
BL
ISOM
MGT

201
260
251
300

Principles of Accounting 1
Principles of Business Law  
Introductory Operations Mgt  
Managing Behavior in Org

3
3
3
3

Business elective 

3

     

15 hrs

Students may choose the business elective from ACC 202; ECON 202; RE 230; RMI 270; MGT 241, 261; or other business elective as approved by the construction management student advisor.  

Open only to construction management majors to meet the requirements for accreditation by the American Council of Construction Education. ACCE standards require specific courses in law, accounting, management, and economics. 

MINOR IN COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY, 18 hours

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TCMP 



111
210
211
310
311

Computer Assembly Trblshooting  
Internetwork Fundamentals  
System Admin Fundamentals  
Internetwork Design Admin  
Infrastructure Services  

3
3
3
3
3

TCMP elective course 

3

     

18 hrs 

MINOR IN CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT, 18 hours

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Construction core, 15 hours

TCST



104
180
320
355
400

Introduction to Construction 
Construction Documents  
Estimating 
Planning and Scheduling  
Const Proj Mngmnt

3
3
3
3
3

     

15 hrs 
3 hours from

TCST








106
200
250
252
300    
302
310
350
365
420

CAD for Const Management (3)
Site Preparation (3)
Construction Methods Matls 1 (3)
Building Diagnostics (3)
Structural Mechanics (3)
Highway Construction 1 (3)
Ethics in Construction (3)
Mechanical/Electrical Systems (3)
Construction Safety (3)
Construction Finance and Law (3)

 
Approved technical elective 

     

18 hrs 

MINOR IN DESIGN TECHNOLOGY, 18 hours

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CR HRS

TGRA

184
286
385
387

Comp Applications-Graphic Arts 
Digital Photography 1
Commercial Printing
Digital Photography 2 

3
3
3
3

6 hours from     

Approved electives

6

     

18 hrs

MINOR IN DIGITAL PUBLISHING, 18 hours

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NO

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CR HRS

TGRA  




180
184    
282
286
382
387

Introduction to Graphic Arts 
Comp Applications-Graphic Arts  
Digital Imaging 1 
Digital Photography 1 
Digital Imaging 2  
Digital Photography 2

3
3
3
3
3
3

     

18 hrs

MINOR IN FOUNDATIONS OF COMPUTER SYSTEMS, 19-21 hours
(See Interdepartmental Programs.) 

MINOR IN GRAPHIC ARTS TECHNOLOGY, 18 hours

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TGRA  






180
181
182
183
184
282   
or
381

Introduction to Graphic Arts
Flexography 
Offset Lithography 1 
Screen Printing 
Comp Applications-Graphic Arts    
Digital Imaging 1 (3) 
  
Quality Control (3)

3
3
3
3
3


3

     

18 hrs

MINOR IN INDUSTRIAL LEADERSHIP, 18 hours

PREFIX

NO

SHORT TITLE

CR HRS

MGT  

TDPT

TMFG

261
300
360
390
161

Personnel and Supervision
Managing Behavior in Org  
Industrial Safety and Health 
Training and Devel in Industry  
Intro Manufacturing Industries 

3
3
3
3
3

Approved technical elective 

3

     

18 hrs

MINOR IN INDUSTRY AND TECHNOLOGY, 24 hours

Courses in industry and technology are elected with the advice of the department chairperson. 

See the Miller College of Business, Departments of Information Systems and Operations Management, and Marketing and Management, for the minors in industrial technology for students with majors in logistics and supply chain management, management, or marketing. 

MINOR IN OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH
COMPLIANCE, 18 hours

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Required courses, 15 hours from

EMHS
TDPT


TCST

TDPT

350
101
201
301
365
or
360

Haz Mat Health and Safety (3)
Fund S & H Technology (3)
S &H Reg Compliance (3)
Develop/Manage S & H Programs (3)
Construction Safety (3)

Industrial Safety and Health (3)

15

Electives, 3 hours from

AQUA

HSC
NREM

PEP
TDPT
WWIN

260
301
250
346
347
250
380
201

Emergency Responder (3)
Instructor of CPR & First Aid (2)
Emergency Health Care (3)
Indoor Environmental Quality (3)
Occupational/Indust Hygiene (3)
First Aid (2)
Internship in Technology (3)
Improving Worker Wellbeing (3)

3


18 hrs

MINOR IN PLASTICS TECHNOLOGY, 16 hours

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CR HRS

CHEM 
TDPT
TMFG

111
125
105
225
325

General Chemistry 1  
Survey of Plastics  
Technical Design Graphics 
Industrial Plastics 
Plastics Product Design

4
3
3
3
3

     

16 hrs

TEACHER EDUCATION

Teaching programs require additional courses in educational methods. The professional education courses are included in this listing. See the Department of Educational Studies and Teachers College for the descriptions of these courses and other professional requirements of the teacher education program. 

TEACHING MAJOR IN TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING 
EDUCATION, 39 hours

The Teaching Major in Technology and Engineering Education curriculum prepares students to teach engineering and technology education at the secondary level (grades 6-12). 

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MATH
TCST
TDPT  




TEDU 

111
250
100
204
210
303
406
108
305
403

Pre-calculus Algebra
Construction Methods Matls 1
Technology and Society 
Energy Processing
Engineering Principles 
Manufacturing Systems
Technical Decision Making 
Production Techniques  
Technological Systems
Technological Enterprise   

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

3 hours from design competency

TCST TEDU
TMFG

106
102
105

CAD for Const Management (3)
Design Techniques (3)
Technical Design Graphics (3)

3

3 hours from information processing

CS
TCMP
TGRA 

110
111  
180

Intro Comp Sci & Web Prog (3)
Computer Assembly Trblshooting (3) 
Introduction to Graphic Arts (3)

3

3 hours from engineered resources

TDPT
TMFG

203
262

Material Processing (3)
Manufacturing Materials (3)

3

     

39 hrs
CHEM 111 is prerequisite to TMFG 262. Students should take PHYC 100 for the University Core Curriculum and to satisfy the prerequisite for TDPT 210. Either CHEM 111 or PHYC 100 may satisfy the University Core Curriculum Tier 1 Domain-Natural Sciences. 

SENIOR HIGH, JUNIOR HIGH/MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATION PROGRAM

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Professional education sequence, 42 hours

EDFO
EDJH
EDMU
EDPS

EDRD
EDSE


TEDU

420
385
205
251
390
320
380
460
465
195
395    
396

Soc, Hist, Phil Found of Ed  
Prin of Tchng in Mid Schl 
Intro to Multicul Ed
Development Secondary 
Educational Psychology 
Content Area Reading
Princ of Tchng in Sec School 
Student Tchng: Sec Schl (6-7) 
Elective Student Teaching (3 or 5)
Exploring Technology Education 
Teaching Technology 
Prgrm Plnnng Implemt

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
7
5
3
3
3

     

42 hrs
See Professional Education Assessment/Decision Points, for additional information. Students must complete TEDU 195, 395, and 396 prior to student teaching. 

PURDUE UNIVERSITY—MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (PUME)

102 Production Drawing (3)
Application of principles of engineering drawing to detail, assembly, design layout, equipment installations, and related drawings.
    Prerequisite: TMFG 105.

104 Industrial Organization (3)
Organizational structures, operational, financial, marketing, and accounting activities; duties of management, planning, control, personnel, safety, wages, policy, and human conditions necessary for effective management.

111 Applied Statics (3)
A study of force systems, resultants and equilibrium, trusses, frames, beams, shear, and moments in beams. 
    Prerequisite: MATH 112; PUME 160.

141 Materials and Processes 1 (3)
Structures, properties, and applications of metals, ceramics, and polymers commonly used in industry. Includes primary production processes, as well as heat treatments and hot or cold working to meet varied commercial needs. Introduces metallurgy and environmental considerations.

142 Materials and Processes 2 (3)
Basic casting, welding, and joining processes. Foundry areas include patterns, cores, molding, melting, and cleaning. Presents basic arc, gas, TIG, and MIG welding methods as well as the metallurgy of welding processes.

160 Applied Engineering Computational Analysis (2)
Computations with the electronic calculator. The factor label method of unit conversion of commonly used engineering (including metric) units. Construction, drawing, and use of engineering graphs for both descriptive and computational purposes. Introduces computer programming using the BASIC language with emphasis on development of skills.

211 Applied Strength of Materials (4)
Principles of applied strength of materials primarily with reference to application. 
    Prerequisite: PUME 111.

213 Dynamics (2)
Applied fundamentals of dynamic forces, including displacement, velocities, accelerations, work energy, power, impulse, momentum, and impact. 
    Prerequisite: MATH 161; PUME 111.

214 Machine Elements (3)
Applies theories and methods developed in statics, dynamics, and strength of materials to the selection of basic machine components. Develops the fundamental principles required for the selection of the elements of which a machine is composed. 
    Prerequisite: PUME 211, 213.

220 Heat and Power 1 (3)
Principles of thermodynamics and fluid dynamics as applied to the conservation laws of mass and energy, prime movers, and power cycles. 
    Prerequisite: MATH 161; PUME 160.

230 Fluid Power (3)
A study of compressible and incompressible fluid statics and dynamics as applied to industrial hydraulic and pneumatic circuits and controls. 
    Prerequisite: MATH 161.

242 Manufacturing Processes (3)
Manufacturing processes and tools used by industry to convert bars, forgings, castings, plate, and sheet materials into finished products. Includes basic mechanics of materials removal and forming, measuring, quality control, and safety of operations. 
    Prerequisite: PUME 141.

299 Mechanical Engineering Technology (1-3)
Hours and subject matter to be arranged by instructor and approved by MET curriculum committee. Primarily for third- and fourth-semester students with special aptitudes. 
    Prerequisite: mechanical engineering technology major.
    A total of 3 hours of credit may be earned.

TECHNOLOGY: COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY (TCMP)

111 Microcomputer Assembly and Troubleshooting (3)
Covers various aspects of PC technology and troubleshooting. Through lecture and lab, students will gain an understanding of the design, installation, and maintenance of PC hardware, software, operating systems, and network connectivity.

210 Fundamentals of Network Design (3)
Data networks are a fundamental aspect of most organizations. In this course, the core concepts, theories, and practices of network design and implementation will be addressed. These will be reinforced through hands-on projects and case study.

211 System Administration Fundamentals (3)
Introduction to the fundamentals of system administration in a client-server environment. Focus on the management of resources on prevailing network operating systems. 
    Prerequisite: TCMP 111.

221 Alternative PC Operating Systems (3)
Comparative analysis of current and emerging PC operating systems. In addition to exploring the relative strengths and weaknesses of alternative PC operating systems such as Linux and Macintosh, the installation, maintenance, and troubleshooting of these operating systems will be explored through hands-on labs. 
    Prerequisite: TCMP 111.

270 (TMFG 270) Industrial and Computer Electronics (3)
Theory and application of electronics in computer technology industry. Includes fundamentals of electricity, DC Circuits, introduction to semiconductor devices, microcontrollers, and integrated circuits. Work includes the use of test meters, power supplies, breadboards, and circuit simulation software.

310 Internetwork Design and Administration (3)
Intermediate course in network design and administration. Topics may include layer-2 switching concepts, intermediate IP addressing strategies, and wide area network (WAN) protocols. The application of concept and theory is achieved through labs and case projects. 
    Prerequisite: TCMP 210.

311 Infrastructure Services (3)
A study of the infrastructure services in a network operating system that are required for basic functionality of a networked environment. Topics may include the design, implementation, security, and troubleshooting of infrastructure services such as DNS, DHCP, NAT, and others. 
    Prerequisite: TCMP 211.

321 Alternative Server Operating Systems (3)
Comparative analysis of current and emerging server operating systems. In addition to exploring the relative strengths and weaknesses of alternative server operating systems, the installation, maintenance, and troubleshooting of these operating systems will be explored through hands-on labs. 
    Prerequisite: TCMP 221, 311

330 Internetwork Switching (3)
A detailed study of switching technology in a networked environment. Topics may include multilayered switching, multicast, Spanning Tree, trunking, and VLAN. 
    Prerequisite: TCMP 111, 210, 310.

340 Wireless Network Communications (3)
A study of current and emerging wireless technologies and their integration into the design and implementation of networks. Topics include fundamental wireless communication concepts, wireless local areas networks (WLAN), and their impact on organization communications.         
    Prerequisite: TCMP 210.  

371 (TMFG 371) Microprocessor and Microcomputer to Machine Interfacing (3)
Digital microprocessor and microcomputer technology and its applications in machine interfacing and controls. Activities include the study of sensor technology, analog and digital instrumentation, machine to computer interfacing, motion controls, basic robotics, and system interconnections.                 
    Prerequisite: TCMP 270 with a minimum grade of C or better. 

380 Electronic Communications Administration (3)
A study of electronic communications methodologies in an enterprise network. Topics may include e-mail and groupware systems administration. Design, selection, installation, and management of these systems will be emphasized. 
    Prerequisite: TCMP 111, 211, 311.

400 Sustainability in Information Technology (3)
A study of sustainability issues related to the field of information technology. Explores the environmental, economic, and human impact of information technology. 
    Prerequisite: junior standing.

410 Scalable Internetworking (3)
A study of advanced network design issues for the large to enterprise level network. Topics may include advanced routing (OSPF, IS-IS, BGP) and advanced IP addressing (IPv6). 
    Prerequisite: TCMP 310.

421 Data Storage/Disaster Recovery (3)
A study of the strategies for data storage and recovery. Topics may include SAN, NAS, and disaster recovery methodologies. 
    Prerequisite: TCMP 111, 211, 311.

430 Convergent Network Systems (3)
A study of the convergence of services on enterprise networks. With the convergence of voice, video, and data networks, current and emerging concepts, technologies, and practices that facilitate a unified communication network will be emphasized. 
    Prerequisite: TCMP 310, 311.

440 Directory Services (3)
A study of directory services and their impact on organizations. Topics will include how directory services can be designed, implemented, secured, and maintained in an enterprise network to achieve a centralized authentication and resource management strategy. 
    Prerequisite: TCMP 311.

450 Enterprise Infrastructure Design (3)
Students will explore the requirements for establishing an enterprise level information technology infrastructure. Included will be an in-depth study of datacenter design. 
    Prerequisite: TCMP 111, 210, 211, 310, 311; junior standing.

465 Information Security (3)
Covers three tenets of data communications: confidentiality, integrity, and availability. Students will be familiarized with a variety of tools used to identify security weaknesses on hosts, servers, and networks. Students will learn to think critically and comprehensively about data security. 
    Prerequisite: TCMP 310, 311. 
    Open only to juniors and seniors.

466 Capstone in Computer Technology (3)
Students will be engaged in immersive learning experiences integrating and applying the knowledge, skills, and abilities developed throughout the computer technology curriculum. 
    Prerequisite: senior standing. 

TECHNOLOGY: CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY (TCST)

104 Introduction to Construction (3)
Overview of the aspects of construction management including designer-builder relationships, construction documents, estimating, scheduling, project management, safety, materials, and other relevant subjects.

106 CAD for Construction Management (3)
Focuses on the application of computer-aided design processes in construction management.

180 Construction Documents (3)
Overview in the reading and utilization of construction documents, including print reading. Use and analysis of the project manual and specification section, bidding documents, and other relative subjects.

200 Site Preparation (3)
The study of the processes related to the preparation of a construction site. Specific topics include the fundamentals of surveying, soil types, and foundation systems.

206 Building Information Modeling (BIM) for Construction Management (3)
Application of Building Information Modeling (BIM) in construction management, including creating three-dimensional models of projects, extracting quantities of materials, creating animations, time-phased simulations, and clash detection/correction.         
    Prerequisite: TCST 104 and 180.  

222 Technical Presentation for Construction Managers (3)
Examines presentation of technical information for construction managers, including oral and written communication in technical and professional settings.                 
    Prerequisite: ENG 103 or 104 or 114 and COMM 210.

250 Construction Methods and Materials 1 (3)
Introduction to the application of sequential construction methods combined with the study of materials as they are utilized in structures. Special emphasis on the role of a construction manager in the proper handling and utilization of construction materials.

251 Construction Methods and Materials 2 (3)
Team-based integration and management of construction, documentation, testing, and application of construction materials for a specified structure. Special emphasis on the use of concrete, steel, and minor supporting materials to fabricate and combine free-spanning structural components for a specified structural project.

252 Building Diagnostics (3)
Overview of building construction and energy systems, energy audit techniques, principles of heat transfer and air movement. Field and laboratory work to include pressurization and remote heat sensing devices to measure energy loss in building.

261 Mechanical Construction Management (3)
The study of managing the construction of mechanical systems, including codes, design, methods, and materials related to plumbing, heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and fire sprinkler systems.                 
    Prerequisite: TCST 104 and 106 and 180.

262 Electrical Construction Management (3)
The study of managing the construction of electrical systems, including codes, design, methods, and materials.         
    Prerequisite: TCST 104 and 106 and 180.  

280 Construction Specifications for Construction Management (3)
Examines what construction specifications are, how they are developed, and how they are applied in construction management. Focuses on understanding and interpreting written construction documents and improving communication among all members of the construction team.         
    Prerequisite: TCST 104 and 180.  

299X Special Topics in Construction Management (0-3)
Special topics relevant to the construction management profession. Course titles will be announced before each semester.                 
    A total of 9 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term.

300 Structural Mechanics (3)
The study of static equilibrium, free-body, shear and bending-moment diagram. The computation of loads, moment, and shear for beams and trusses. 
    Prerequisite: MATH 112; PHYC 110.

302 Highway Construction 1 (3)
Basic knowledge of sources, properties, design methods, standards, tests, and uses of materials in various types of highway construction. 
    Prerequisite: TCST 250.

303 Highway Construction 2 (3)
Highway construction methods and economic applications. Team development of construction scheduling and cost estimates for highway construction projects under closely simulated conditions. 
    Prerequisite: TCST 302, 355. 

310 Ethics in Construction (3)
Examines professionalism within the modern construction industry. Traces the development of building professions with regard to the foundations of current practice. Focuses on career options and planning, leadership, ethics, and ethical practice using case studies and selected readings. 
    Prerequisite: TCST 104.

315 Sustainable Construction (3)
Provides detailed knowledge related to sustainable construction. Emphasis will be on green building rating systems, and course work includes case studies, guest speakers, field trips, investigation of green materials, and a term project.                 
    Open only to juniors and seniors.

320 Estimating (3)
An introduction to estimating in construction. Reviews and incorporates knowledge of construction planning and processes, developing estimates using labor costs, and standards used by the industry. 
    Prerequisite: TCST 104, 180, or permission of the department chairperson.

350 Mechanical and Electrical Systems (3)
The study of codes, design, methods, and materials related to electrical, plumbing, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems.

355 Planning and Scheduling (3)
Planning and scheduling practices for managing construction projects. Topics include parameters affecting planning, presentation of scheduling information, impact of changes, and resource allocation and management. Specific emphasis on critical path method, network diagramming, calculations, and computer applications. 
    Prerequisite: TCST 104, 180, or permission of the department chairperson.

365 Construction Safety (3)
Study of the practices used to establish a safe and healthful environment for construction site personnel/occupants. Includes the codes and requirements of safety and health regulating agencies.

400 Construction Project Management (3)
The study of project management concepts, procedures, and practices common in the construction industry. Includes construction project management concepts, roles, and responsibilities; labor relations; administrative systems and procedures; cost control data and procedures; documentation at job site and office; change orders; submittal processes; quality control philosophies and techniques; and computer applications. 
    Prerequisite: TCST 104, 180, 320, 355, or permission of the department chairperson. 

420 Construction Finance and Law (3)
The principles of business law applicable to the construction process including employer, employee, and client rights and obligations, and partnerships. The principles of finance related to construction are also covered. 
    Prerequisite: ACC 201.

460 Capstone in Construction (3)
A construction product, process, or system is studied. Conduct in-depth research on an approved topic related to construction. Results of the research are formally presented to peers and faculty. 
    Prerequisite: TCST 104, 180, 320, 355, or permission of the department chairperson. 
    Prerequisite or parallel: TCST 400; TDPT 390. 
    Open only to majors in construction management with senior status.

490 Independent Study in Construction Management (0-3)
Academic project directed by a construction management faculty member. Written proposal must be approved by program director prior to term of study.         
    Prerequisite: sponsorship by a CM faculty member and written proposal must be approved by CM program director prior to term of study.                 
    A total of 9 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term.

TECHNOLOGY: DEPARTMENT (TDPT)

100 Technology and Society (3)
The history, development, production, use, and assessment of technology and an examination of its effects upon resources, individuals, society, and the environment.

101 Fundamentals of Safety and Health Technology (3)
Study of accident-prevention and loss-control methods, procedures, and programs and their impact on people and workplaces; and the ethical application of codes and standards, applicable safety and health-related practices, and safety engineering and management principles.

102 Introduction to Computer-Aided Design (3)
Designed to provide students with an introduction to the use of computer-aided software utilizing the use of 2-D applications.

110 Instructional Technology in the Elementary School (2)
Develops basic skills in the use of instructional technology to support teaching and learning in the elementary school. Includes lab activities outside of class.

125 Survey of Plastics (3)
Surveys the plastics industry and introduces the uniqueness of plastics relative to traditional materials. Topics include plastics organizations, environmental issues, career and job opportunities, identification of plastics, manufacture of plastics, application of plastics, etc.

154 Graphic Communication for Interior Design (3)
Introduction to the fundamentals of graphic communication techniques used in design fields. Explores sketching, mechanical, and computer techniques to produce graphics for a variety of presentation methods.

160 Technical Analysis (3)
The computational and presentation skills needed to solve technical problems.

201 Safety and Health Regulations and Compliance (3)
Mandatory safety and health regulations and compliance standards and procedures are investigated based upon Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), insurance institute, and workplace standards/practices.

203 Material Processing (3)
Industrial materials and processes are studied, including material identification, classification, properties, procurement, processing, use, and disposal. Includes laboratory activities.

204 Energy Processing (3)
Examines sources and types of energy and common energy processing techniques. Emphasizes controlling and transmitting energy and the operation of energy conversion systems. Includes laboratory activities.

210 Engineering Principles (3)
Examines core concepts and principles of engineering, including constraints, optimization, and predictive analysis. Laboratory experiences emphasize the development of skills required to apply engineering processes. 
    Prerequisite: MATH 111; PHYC 100.

213 Interior Construction Materials, Processes, and Products (3)
Designed specifically for non-majors. Content is organized around specific construction units related to materials, processes, and products of residential and commercial construction. 

280 3-D Prototyping (3)
Introduction for students from many disciplines to use the 3-D graphics software, reverse engineering, rapid prototyping, laser machining, and CNC machining to iteratively manipulate original 3-D product designs and make prototypes.

299X Experimental/Developmental Topics (3-6)
Topics relevant to the discipline. Course titles will be announced before each semester. 
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.

301 Developing and Managing Safety and Health Programs (3)
An analysis of the concepts, relationships, and principles of managing an organization's occupational safety and health technology duties and functions; and the development of safety objectives and policies, training procedures and practices for integration into an organization, and evaluation and management of risk and program implementation and evaluation. 
    Prerequisite: TDPT 101 or permission of the instructor.

303 Manufacturing Systems (3)
Manufacturing systems, tools, and processes are studied as they are applied to producing products. Laboratory experiences cover manufacturing systems emphasizing tooling design, automated manufacturing, and control systems. Includes laboratory activities. 
    Prerequisite: TMFG 105 or TCST 106, TEDU 108 or permission of the department chairperson.

360 Industrial Safety and Health (3)
Study of the practices used to establish a safe and healthful environment for industrial personnel. Includes the requirements of safety- and health-regulating agencies, and hazard recognition and correction.

364 Technology Education for the Elementary Grades (2)
A laboratory in technology education emphasizing the use of tools, materials, and processes that provide enrichment of the elementary program. Methods of planning and developing individual and group activity units are examined and evaluated.

369 Cooperative Education in Technology (1-3)
A planned continuous placement in a technology-related position that integrates and applies course content to the workplace. A paid work and learning experience for manufacturing engineering technology, industrial technology, and graphic arts management majors. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the work experience coordinator. 
    A total of 12 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term.

380 Internship in Technology (3)
Emphasizes internal or external placement in a technology workplace. Provides opportunities to integrate and apply course content to the workplace. A paid or unpaid work experience for majors in the Department of Technology. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the work experience coordinator. 
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term.

390 Training and Development in Industry (3)
Training and development in industry and their relationship to the job and organization. Emphasizes skills needed to systematically plan, implement, evaluate, and revise training and development programs. Provides opportunities for practical application and practice.

400 Capstone in Technology for the Elementary Grades (3)
Use of hands-on laboratory experiences to apply, integrate, and assess technological concepts, systems, processes, and products. Includes laboratory activities. 
    Prerequisite: EDTE 120; TDPT 100; or permission of the department chairperson.

406 Technological Decision Making (3)
Focuses on technology assessment techniques used to differentiate the potential impacts of alternative technological decisions. Policy development in the public and private sectors, and at the personal level, is examined. 
    Prerequisite: junior status.

450 Industrial Research and Development (3)
Focuses on the methodology and practices of technical research and development as conducted in an industrial setting. In laboratory activities students perform basic tasks associated with product and process research and development. 
    Prerequisite: TEDU 403 or TMFG 161.

TECHNOLOGY: EDUCATION (TEDU)

102 Design Techniques (3)
Introduces tools and techniques for developing and communicating technological designs. Experiences include sketching, rendering, mechanical and computer-aided drawing, modeling, and presentation skills. Includes laboratory activities.

108 Production Techniques (3)
Studies the tools, machines, and processes used in the technology education classroom and laboratory. Laboratory experiences help develop techniques related to material and information processing. Includes laboratory activities.

195 Exploring Technology Education (3)
The profession of teaching technology in the public schools is introduced and discussed. Study of the role of education, good teacher qualities, and the development of technology education programs. State and national curriculum trends are analyzed.

202 Product Design (3)
A variety of design models and techniques are explored. Focuses on elements and principles of design, design processes and characteristics, developing and evaluating potential solutions, modeling, and presenting solutions. Includes laboratory activities. 
    Prerequisite: TEDU 102, 108.

290 Career and Technical Student Organizations (3)
Emphasizes the implementation, maintenance, and evaluation of career and technical student organizations.

292 Principles and Philosophy of Career and Technical Education (3)
Introduction to the foundation and operation of various career and technical educational programs. Analyzes legislation in the light of past and present issues of career and technical education and its function as a vital component of the educational system.

304 Transportation Systems (3)
Studies transportation technology as it is applied to vehicular and support systems for moving people and cargo in various environments. The effects of transportation technology on individuals, society, and the environment are introduced and explored. Includes laboratory activities. 
    Prerequisite: TEDU 102, 108 or permission of the department chairperson.

305 Technological Systems (3)
The study of technological systems involving communication, production, transportation, and bio-technologies. Classroom and laboratory experiences examine the nature of modern systems. 

390 Trade and Occupational Analysis (3)
A study of the fundamentals of analyzing trades and occupations. Techniques of identifying occupations by breakdown into jobs, tasks, and processes.

392 Career and Technical Related Class Content (3)
A study of the sources of related materials and techniques of developing and using these materials.

393 Career and Technical Guidance (3)
Principles, purposes, and practices of guidance by the teacher. Examines and evaluates educational and occupational information, testing programs, school records, occupational trends, and job-training programs.

395 Teaching Technology (3)
Studies the development and implementation of strategies for teaching technology education. Emphasizes planning daily instruction, preparing support materials, classroom management, assessing and evaluating learning, and a variety of teaching strategies and skills in technology education. Includes a public school teaching experience. 
    Prerequisite: TEDU 195.

396 Program Planning and Implementation (3)
Design and evaluate technology-based instruction and curriculum for meeting student needs. Facility planning, program planning, and trends in technology education are explored. Includes a public school teaching experience. 
    Prerequisite: TEDU 395.

403 Technological Enterprise (3)
Presents the relationship between technology and the corporate sector. Emphasizes organization, management, operation, and impact of technological enterprises. Laboratory experiences include organizing, staffing, and operating a student-managed enterprise. Includes laboratory activities.                 
    Prerequisite: TEDU 102 or TMFG 105 or TCST 106, TEDU 108. 

410 Capstone Experience in Technology (3)
A technological product, process, or system is studied. Conduct in-depth research on an approved topic related to technology. Results of the research are formally presented to peers and faculty. 
    Prerequisite: junior standing.

490 Study in Technology (1-3)
Personal or group study of a technology that is not emphasized in other courses. 
    A total of 3 hours of credit may be earned.

492 Organization and Coordination of Career and Technical Education (3)
The organizational structure, responsibilities, and roles recognized in the operation of career and technical education programs. Major emphasis on state functions.

TECHNOLOGY: GRAPHIC ARTS/PRINTING (TGRA)

180 Introduction to Graphic Arts (3)
The history of printing, computer and traditional prepress processes, conventional and digital reproduction processes, post press operations, and career exploration in graphic communication are examined.

181 Flexography (3)
A fundamental course based on the principles and practices utilized in the flexographic printing industry. Instructional emphasis focuses on artwork preparation, image generation/conversion, plates and platemaking, inks, substrates, tooling, presswork, and finishing operations unique to flexography.

182 Offset Lithography 1 (3)
The study of offset lithography that includes planning and layout, platemaking, presswork, and multi-color printing.

183 Screen Printing (3)
Covers the screen printing process as it relates to graphic communications, and as an auxiliary manufacturing process in other fields. Instructional areas include products, materials, equipment, production techniques and processes, and ink substrate relationships.

184 Computer Applications in Graphic Arts (3)
Computer applications for design and graphic communication are examined and applied. Applications include: Windows and Macintosh operating systems, image illustration and manipulation, page layout, Web site, and other graphic design applications.

281 Ink and Substrate (3)
Students examine inks, substrates, and ink-substrate interactions. Students also develop skills in ink and paper testing. 
    Prerequisite: TGRA 180, 181, 182, 183.

282 Digital Imaging 1 (3)
Emphasizes the theoretical and practical applications of digital imaging. Includes the study of vector and raster graphic file types as well as software applications, image creation, manipulation, and output. 
    Prerequisite: TGRA 180, 184

286 Digital Photography 1 (3)
This digital photography course emphasizes design, exposure techniques, composition, basic digital image capture, and electronic image manipulation.

381 Quality Control (3)
Explores the quality control process in the printing industry. Focuses on the concepts of total quality management, including statistical process control, printing industry standards ISO 9000, and Six Sigma. 
    Prerequisite: TGRA 180, 181, 182, 183.

382 Digital Imaging 2 (3)
Advanced study of digital imaging systems. Topics include the control and calibration of image creation as well as image output and proofing. Importance of current imaging standards will also be stressed. 
    Prerequisite: TGRA 282.

383 Offset Lithographic Presswork (3)
Advanced study of lithographic printing designed to provide an understanding of the control, operation, and advancements of the lithographic printing press. Information for both Web and sheet fed operations will be included with emphasis on monitoring and controlling printing press characteristics. 
    Prerequisite: TGRA 180, 182, 282.

385 Commercial Printing (3)
Studies practical applications of running a graphic imaging company. Modeled after an actual graphic communication company. Students work together in groups that follow actual print projects from design through creation and output. Students gain an understanding of working with others while building practical skills in areas of production. 
    Prerequisite: TGRA 180, 181, 182, 183.

387 Digital Photography 2 (3)
Emphasizes color theory, digital editing software, and composition principles as they relate to the photographic process. Applications to commercial photography, lighting, and the photographic studio will also be covered. 
    Prerequisite: TGRA 286 or ART 231 or the equivalent.

480 Capstone in Graphic Arts (3)
A capstone course that focuses on emerging trends, processes, and technologies in the contemporary graphic arts/printing industry. Students are required to complete a senior project related to the graphic arts/printing industry. 
    Prerequisite: TGRA 385.

484 Printing Management (3)
Studies planning, organization, control, and motivation as they relate to managing a business. Emphasis is on human relations, decision making, problem solving, and coordination of management, sales, and production for successful management. 
    Prerequisite: TGRA 381, 385.

488 Printing Estimating and Cost Analysis (3)
An introduction to estimating practices prevalent to the graphic communications industry. Emphasis will be placed on cost estimating a job by hand and by computer from start to finish based on a selected printing process. Covers break-even analysis and development of budgeted hourly rates. 
    Prerequisite: TGRA 385.

489 Production Control in the Printing Industry (3)
Covers production control systems used in the printing and publishing industries. Topics include plant and facility layout, production scheduling, process mapping, decision making, quality control, inventory control, and cost analysis. 
    Prerequisite: TGRA 385.

TECHNOLOGY: MANUFACTURING (TMFG)

104 Introduction to Six Sigma (3)
Introduces the tenets of Six Sigma and Lean Performance. Uses descriptive statistics (graphical techniques) to develop analytical and problem-solving skills.

105 Technical Design Graphics (3)
Introduction to mechanical design and production drawing. Topics include: sketching, lettering, solid modeling, multiview drawings, isometric drawings, auxiliary and section views, dimensioning and tolerancing, and the creation of working drawings. Unigraphics solid modeling software is the primary design tool used in the laboratory. A weekly laboratory is scheduled.

161 Introduction to Manufacturing Industries (3)
Introduction to manufacturing and its managed activities: research and development, production, marketing, industrial relations, and finance. Laboratory experiences involve organizing, staffing, and operating a model manufacturing enterprise.

205 Computer-Aided Design (3)
Emphasizes modeling and dimensioning. Additional topics include: feature identification and parametric design, dimensioning and modeling with consideration to part relationships, fundamentals of geometric, dimensioning and tolerancing, advanced work with assembly drawings, design of functional gages, and rapid prototyping. A weekly laboratory is scheduled. 
    Prerequisite: TMFG 105 or equivalent. 
    Parallel: appropriate 100-level mathematics course.

225 Industrial Plastics (3)
Study of industrial plastics processes, materials, and product design. Includes polymer chemistry, processing nomenclature, injection molding, extrusion, extrusion blow molding, compression and transfer molding, thermoforming, and other topics. Weekly laboratory scheduled. 
    Prerequisite: CHEM 111. 

233 Machine Tools (3)
Theory and application of production and automated machine tools. Laboratory includes tool design, cutting theory, basic machines, feeds, speeds, precision measurement, NC programming, and safety. Weekly laboratory scheduled. 
    Prerequisite: MATH 112 or equivalent.

262 Manufacturing Materials (3)
Fundamentals of material science with an emphasis on how material properties influence their application in products and processing. Metallic, polymeric, and ceramic materials will be discussed. Laboratory activities using standardized testing procedures will provide a practical understanding of material characteristics. Weekly laboratory scheduled. 
    Prerequisite: CHEM 111 or permission of the department chairperson.

265 Applied Quality Control (3)
Emphasis on application of statistics to quality control. Includes hypothesis testing, statistical process control, measurement system analysis, and review of current quality standards. 
    Prerequisite: MATH 181 or ECON 221, or by permission of the instructor.

301 Automation and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Systems (3)
Comprehensive technical introduction to automation in manufacturing. Includes flow line production, material handling, group technology, and flexible and computer-integrated manufacturing. Weekly laboratory scheduled. 
    Prerequisite: TMFG 161, MATH 112 or 132 or permission of the department chairperson.

305 Manufacturing Design with CAD (3)
Design of tools and fixtures for manufacturing. Includes general purpose workholders, modular and dedicated fixtures, jigs, fixturing principles, degrees of freedom, locating and clamping components, wireframe and solid modeling, and 3-D to 2-D conversion. Students design solid models of fixtures. Weekly laboratory scheduled. 
    Prerequisite: TMFG 205, 233, 335.

307 Applied Statics (3)
Force systems, resultants and equilibrium, trusses, frames, beams, and shear and moments of beams are studied. 
    Prerequisite: MATH 161.

325 Plastics Product Design (3)
Includes plastic materials testing, ASTM standards, mold design and process considerations, material rheology, failure analysis, mold bases, molding problems and solutions, snap fit design, competitive processes, and other selected topics. Weekly laboratory scheduled. 
    Prerequisite: TMFG 225.

326 Plastic Production Systems (3)
Plastics processing with automated production equipment. Emphasizes injection molding, extrusion, and thermoforming. Appropriate applications of process capability, Ishikawa diagrams, control charts, and other process variation identification tools for both process and product analysis. Weekly laboratory scheduled. 
    Prerequisite: TMFG 325.

327 Advanced Plastics Product Design (3)
Emphasizes rheology, additives and their impact on processing and final part characteristics, part design, mold flow, cavity fabrication, cavity material selection, part failure, cooling calculations, and rapid prototyping. Weekly laboratory scheduled. 
    Prerequisite: TMFG 265, 325.

331 Automated Machines (3)
Theory and application of automated machines in the manufacturing environment. Laboratory focuses on the programming and operation of NC machine tools. Weekly laboratory scheduled. 
    Prerequisite: MATH 112; TMFG 205, 233.

333 Manufacturing Machine Tool Processing (3)
Focuses on conditions that influence the control of metal manufacturing processes. Laboratory activities emphasize the significance of locators, power requirements, feeds, speeds, micro-structure, coolants, and other variables. Complex operations are covered on grinding, milling, EDM, and other multifunctional machine tools. 
    Prerequisite: TMFG 233.

334 Welding and Foundry (3)
Flat-position welding with electric and oxyacetylene equipment. Limited work with gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) equipment. Emphasizes various casting methods, pattern design, sands, gating, cores, furnaces, pouring techniques, and automated foundry practices. Weekly laboratory scheduled. 
    Prerequisite: TMFG 262.

335 Applied Mechanics (3)
Combined statics and strength of materials with applications in manufacturing. Includes design of bolted connections, simple structures, centroids, moments of inertia, and beam design. Weekly laboratory scheduled. 
    Prerequisite: MATH 161; PHYC 110; TMFG 262.

340 Fluid Power: Hydraulic Systems (3)
Fundamentals of hydraulic systems emphasizing applications of Bernoulli’s equation. Includes component types and designs, hydraulic circuit analysis, and design of hydraulic systems. Weekly laboratory scheduled. 
    Prerequisite: TMFG 307 or permission of the department chairperson.

363 Manufacturing Operations (3)
Focuses on analyzing product designs and the design, engineering, and operation of industrial production systems through classroom and laboratory activities. 
    Prerequisite: TEDU 403 or TMFG 105 and 161.

365 Six Sigma Foundations (3)
Development of Lean Six Sigma foundational skills and analytical and statistical analysis skills. Lean Six Sigma tools are introduced. Topics include: Lean and Six Sigma concepts and practices, quality tools, basic statistics, continuous and discrete process capability, and control methods. Students are required to pass ten Lean Six Sigma Commercial Exams.                 
    Prerequisite: ECON 221. 

370 AC Circuit Analysis (3)
Studies the usage and interaction of discrete electronic components, integrated circuits, and microcontrollers. Weekly laboratory scheduled work includes use of capacitors, diodes, transistors, analog/digital converters, and operational amplifiers. 
    Prerequisite: TCMP 371.

375 Project Planning and Control (3)
Focuses on project planning and control. Students will participate in a simulated lean Six Sigma project. Students will take comprehensive lean Six Sigma black belt certification exams. Students who pass all the exams will receive lean Six Sigma black belt certificate of proficiency. 
    Prerequisite: TMFG 365, 425.

407 Applied Strength of Materials (3)
The principles of strength, stiffness, and stability are introduced and applied primarily to mechanical components. 
    Prerequisite: MATH 162; TMFG 307 or 335.

425 Design of Experiments (3)
Includes, but is not limited to, single-factorial, multi-factorial, and fractional ANOVA and Design for Six Sigma. 
    Prerequisite: TMFG 265.

426 Research and Development in Plastics (3)
Development of research started in TMFG 425. Includes aspects of materials, processing, quality, DOE, materials testing, literature searches/review, and others. Capstone course. Extensive laboratory work required. 
    Prerequisite: TMFG 340, 425.

460 Projects in Computer-Aided Manufacturing 1 (3)
This is the first course of a two-semester sequence of senior capstone. Encompasses the design of product, the selection of raw materials, and the sequence of manufacturing processing techniques. The course emphasizes teamwork, project management, testing through simulation or prototype, and oral and written communications. 
    Prerequisite: senior standing.

463 Manufacturing Planning and Controls (3)
Emphasizes quantitative techniques for manufacturing planning and control. Topics include forecasting techniques, capital equipment justification, production and inventory planning and scheduling (MRP/JIT), and project planning and control (CPM/PERT). Weekly laboratory scheduled. 
    Prerequisite: MATH 162; TMFG 301.

465 Advanced Six Sigma (3)
Introduction to advanced Lean Six Sigma tools and development of analytical analysis and decision-making skills through participation in a simulated project. Extensive use of statistics and Minitab. Students required to pass seven Lean Six Sigma Certified Exams.         
    Prerequisite: ISOM 355 and TMFG 365.                 
    Parallel: ISOM 361. 

469 Six Sigma Project 2 (3)
A paid or unpaid work and learning experience where students will be required to complete the Six Sigma project started in TMFG 465. Student will be required to prepare a full project report. Student will spend a significant amount of time working with a community partner. 
    Prerequisite: TMFG 465; permission of the department chairperson.

473 Projects in Computer-Aided Manufacturing 2 (3)
This is a continuation of ITMFG 460. It includes CNC, CAD, CAM, robotics, and other computer-based technology in manufacturing systems. Extensive laboratory work required. 
    Prerequisite: TMFG 460.

499 Problems in Industrial Technology (1–3)
Individual advanced study and experimentation in technology. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson. 
    A total of 3 hours of credit may be earned.

Academic Systems
North Quadrangle, Room 360
Ball State University
Muncie, IN 47306

Hours: Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.