Undergraduate Course Catalog

School of Physical Education, Sport, and Exercise Science

T. WeidnerChairperson  

The School of Physical Education, Sport, and Exercise Science offers academic programs in aquatics, athletic training, exercise science, sport administration, and physical education (all-grade teaching). In addition, minors are available in aquatics, gerontology, sports medicine, and workplace wellness. An exit assessment must be completed by students in all academic programs in the School.

The University Core Curriculum requirement in physical fitness and wellness consists of one PFW course (2 credits). Students are not permitted to substitute athletics, band, or similar activities for the physical fitness and wellness University Core Curriculum requirement. 


BACHELOR OF ATHLETIC TRAINING, 75-77 hours

The mission of the Ball State University Athletic Training Program is to provide quality education which will create life-long learners that are committed to delivering high quality patient-centered care within an interdisciplinary health care team. We aspire to develop students who are dedicated to maintaining involvement within the profession through clinical practice and service. Course work and clinical experiences are blended to develop knowledge and skills in evidence-based practice, prevention and health promotion, clinical examination and diagnosis, acute care of injury and illness, therapeutic interventions, psychosocial strategies and referral, health care administration, and professional development and responsibility. Athletic training employment settings include sports medicine clinics, high schools (including teaching), colleges/universities, industrial settings, and professional sports. 

Admission Requirements (Professional Program)

  • Formal letter of application.
  • Completion of the Ball State Athletic Training Program Application and responses to the essay questions.
  • Completion of AT 196, 240, and AQUA 260 (with a B- or better grade in each). Completion of ANAT 201 (with a C or better grade). These courses must be completed or in progress at the time of application.
  • Students must complete 30 credit hours at Ball State (15 credit hours for transfer students) with a minimum overall grade-point average of 2.75 at the time of application. Athletic training course credit for transfer students may only be awarded for AT 196 and 240. 
  • Minimum of 25 hours of athletic training observation at the time of application, with a minimum of 50 hours at the time of interview.
  • Copy of all official transcripts.
  • Two letters of recommendation (from references other than Ball State athletic training staff/faculty). 
  • Completion of the Pre-Athletic Training Student Observation Evaluation form.
  • Interview with Athletic Training Program Selection Committee. 
  • Completion of Health History and Physical Examination, including immunization records.
  • Completion of Technical Standards Waiver.
  • Students must have valid CPR/AED certification for the professional rescuer (or equivalent) at the time of the start of the professional phase of the program.

Athletic training students will be responsible for the costs associated with the program. These costs include the following: apparel, local transportation to clinical sites, first aid/CPR/AED training, lab fees, and yearly student membership to the National Athletic Trainers’ Association. 

The pre-professional program should begin in the fall or spring of the freshman year with formal application to the professional program due during the spring semester application cycle. Transfer students and those freshmen not admitted in the spring semester may apply during the fall semester application cycle. Decisions will be made by the Athletic Training Program Selection Committee before the end of registration for the following semester.

Retention Standards (once admitted to professional program) 
The following guidelines will be used to evaluate each athletic training student in order to remain in good standing in the professional program.

Each student

  • must maintain a minimum overall grade-point average of 2.75 with no semester lower than a 2.5. A student who drops below this mark will be placed on probation for one semester. Failure to meet this standard after one semester on probation may result in dismissal from the professional program; 
  • must maintain a minimum grade-point average of 2.75 in the athletic training curriculum. An athletic training student who receives a grade lower than C in any athletic training course will be required to retake the course; 
  • will be evaluated at the end of each semester in the program by the athletic training clinical instructors and program director. These evaluations will be based on clinical performance and timely completion of all clinical documentation. If any report is unsatisfactory, the student will be placed on probation for one semester. A student who does not attain the appropriate skill level after one semester may be dismissed from the professional program; 
  • must satisfy (with or without accommodation) the mental, cognitive, emotional, and physical technical standards involved in completing the competencies and clinical integration proficiencies in the professional program; 
  • must successfully complete annual OSHA Blood Borne Pathogen and HIPAA Training; must maintain current certification in CPR/AED (professional rescuer or equivalent).
  • may be placed on probation or withdrawn from the program in the case of academic dishonesty or professional misconduct.

PREFIX     

NO   

SHORT TITLE

CR HRS

ANAT
AQUA 
AT

















CHEM




EXSC



FCFN

PHYS

201
260 
196
240
250
260
261
360
370
371
372
373
374
392
460
477
492
494
495
497
100
or
101
or
111
201
293
294
301
340
444
205

Fundamentals of Human Anatomy
Emergency Responder 
Intro to Athletic Training
Prevention and Care of Injury
App of Taping in AT
Clinical Education in AT 1
Clinical Education in AT 2
Clinical Education in AT 3
Lower Ext Ortho Eval in AT
Upper Ext Ortho Eval in AT
Therapeutic Modalities in AT
Therapeutic Exercise in AT
Org and Admin of AT
Practicum 1 in Athletic Train (1-3)
Clinical Education in AT 4
Psych Aspects Spts Medicine
Practicum 2 in Athletic Train (1-3)
Clinical Integration in AT
Med and Pharm Aspects of AT
Clinical Decision Making in AT
People and Chemistry (3)

Gen, Org, Biochem/Hlth Sci (5)

General Chemistry 1 (4)
Physical Fitness Assessment
Found Physiology and Exercise
Anatomical Kinesiology
Fund of Exercise Prescription
Prin of Human Nutrition
Sports Nutrition & Weight Ctrl
Fund of Hum Phys

3
3
2
3
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
1
4
2




3-5
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

     

75-77 hrs 
Recommended electives: AT 496; BIO 111; EXSC 320, 329, 493; HSC 398, 465, 467; NUR 101; PHYC 110; PSYS 241. 


EXERCISE SCIENCE MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 59-72 hours

Option 1: Exercise science, 71-72 hours

Admission and retention standards

  • No grade lower than C will be accepted for any required non-University Core Curriculum course.
  • Candidates for the advanced program must fill out an application with the program coordinator when they are enrolled in the last course(s) of the beginning program section (BIO 111, CHEM 101 or CHEM 111, PSYS 100, PEP 250, EXSC 147, 190, 201, 292, 293, 294.) See the program coordinator for more information. The criterion for acceptance into the advanced program is a grade-point average of 2.75 or higher in the beginning program section. Students should not take any advanced program section courses until they have received approval. 
  • To qualify for the internship (EXSC 479), students must have taken all the listed courses, maintained a grade-point average of 2.75 or higher in the advanced program section, and complete a 90-hour noncredit practicum requirement. An overall grade-point average of 2.5 or higher also is required before enrolling in the internship. If students do not meet the grade-point average requirements, they may appeal to the program coordinator for a waiver of this requirement. 

PREFIX

NO

SHORT TITLE

CR HRS

BIO
CHEM


EXSC











ANAT
FCFN
PEP
PSYS 

111
101
or
111
147
190
201
293
294
301
320
402
479
493
292
or
201
340
250
100

Principles of Biology 1  
Gen, Org, Biochem/Hlth Sci (5) 

General Chemistry 1 (4)  
Weight Training  
Foundation of Exercise Science 
Physical Fitness Assessment   
Found Physiology and Exercise 
Anatomical Kinesiology 
Fund of Exercise Prescription 
Resistance Training
Advanced Fitness Assessment  
Exercise Science Internship  
Advanced Exercise Physiology 
Anatomy (3)

Fundamentals of Human Anatomy (3)
Prin of Human Nutrition 
First Aid 
Intro to Psychological Science

4


4-5
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
12
3


3
3
2
3

15 hours from one of the following 2 tracks
Basic and Applied Science Track

BIO
CHEM



EXSC

FCFN
PHYC

PHYS


PSYS

112
112
231
232
360
401
414
444
110
112
411
413
414
241

Principles of Biology 2 (4)
General Chemistry 2 (4)
Organic Chemistry 1 (4)
Organic Chemistry 2 (4)
Essentials of Biochemistry (4) 
Prin of Electrocardiogram (3)
Biomechanics of Human Movement (3) 
Sports Nutrition & Weight Ctrl (3)
General Physics 1 (4)
General Physics 2 (4)
Endocrinology (3)
Renal Physiology (3)
Cardiovascular Physiology (3)
Statistics (3)

15

Health and Fitness Track

EXSC

148

Group Fitness Instructor

1

14 hours from

AT
BUSA
EXSC

FCFN
HSC
ISOM

MGT


PEP

240
302
360
401
444
462
135
251
300
341
361
227 

Prevention and Care of Injury (3) 
Career Management (3) 
Exercise Psychology (3)
Prin of Electrocardiogram (3) 
Sports Nutrition & Weight Ctrl (3) 
Hlth Prmtn in the Worksite (3)
Business Information Systems (3)
Introductory Operations Mgt (3) 
Managing Behavior in Org (3)
Opportunity Identification (3)
Managing Human Resources (3)
Intro Adapted Physical Ed/Act (3) 

14

     

71-72 hrs
Option 2: Aquatics, 59 hours
Core requirements, 15 hours

AQUA  

190 
479

Introduction to Aquatics
Aquatics Internship

3
12

 

 

 


15 hrs

AQUA









EXSC

216
260
313
315
316
404
454
455
457
458
292
294

Lifeguard Training
Emergency Responder 
Biomechanics of Aquatics  
Water Safety Instructor (WSI)  
Aquatic Fitness Instructor 
Lifeguard Instructor (LGI)
Pool Operations and Maint 
Aquatic Faciities Management
Aquatic Facility Design 
Aquatic Leadership Development
Anatomy  
Anatomical Kinesiology

3
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3


34 hrs
10 hours from (minimum of 7 hours of classes with AQUA prefix)

AQUA













AT
PEP

120
213
217
219
220
221
224
225
255
301
314
317
355
456
240
231
326
331
409

Aquatics Special Topics (1-3)
Introduction to Sailing (1)
Canoe and Kayak (1)
Aquatic Sports Officiating (1)
Open Water Scuba (2)
Advanced SCUBA Diver (2)
Divemaster (2)
Assistant Scuba Instructor (2)
Practicum in Aquatics (2)
Instructor of CPR & First Aid (2)
Teaching and Coaching Swimming (2)
Diving Waterpolo Synchro Swim (3)
Internship in Aquatics (1-3)
Camp Waterfront Administration (2) 
Prevention and Care of Injury (3)
Philosophy of Coaching (3)
Adapted Water Exercise (1)
Administration of Coaching (3)
Psychological Social Issues (3)

10

     

59 hrs

MAJOR IN SPORT ADMINISTRATION, 71-74 hours

Admission requirements

  • Completion of ENG 104 with a C or better.
  • Completion of ACC 201; ECON 201; and SPTA 190 (each with C- or better grade). 
  • Completion of at least 8 hours of field experience in the sport industry. 
  • Completion of Ball State University Sport Administration Program application.  
  • Attain a minimum overall grade-point average of 2.5 at the time of application. 

Once admitted into the sport administration major the following guidelines will be used to evaluate each student in order to remain in this program of study. Only students admitted into the program will have access to advanced course work (200-400 level) in the area of sport administration (SPTA prefix). 

  • Maintenance of an overall grade-point average of 2.5 or higher. 
  • No grade lower than a C- will be accepted in any course within the sport administration and business core courses. 
  • Maintenance of an overall grade-point average of 2.0 or higher within the business minor requirement. 
  • Internship (SPTA 479) enrollment requires senior standing and approval of the coordinator. 

PREFIX 

NO   

SHORT TITLE

CR HRS

ACC
BL
ECON
MGT
MKG
PEP
SPTA









201
260
201
300
300
409
190
195
290
300
303
305
345
402
448
479
485

Principles of Accounting 1  
Principles of Business Law
Elementary Microeconomics 
Managing Behavior in Org  
Principles of Marketing
Psychological Social Issues 
Introduction to Sport Admin 
Computer App for Sport Admin  
Revenue Generation in Sport 
Sport Law 
Sport Marketing 
Sport Finance
Sport Communication 
Sport Event and Facility Mgt 
Sport Governance  
Sport Admin Internship 
Sport Management

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
12
3

     

59 hrs
 

Students must also complete the additional hours from one of the following minors:
Foundations of Business (12 hours)
Foundations of Management (12 hours)
Marketing (15 hours)
Professional Selling (15 hours)

12-15

 

71-74 hrs

MINOR IN AQUATICS, 24 hours

PREFIX 

NO 

SHORT TITLE

CR HRS

Common core, 12 hours

AQUA


190
216
315
454

Introduction to Aquatics 
Lifeguard Training 
Water Safety Instructor (WSI) 
Pool Operations and Maint 

3
3
3
3

     

12 hrs
Complete one option
Option 1: Teaching aquatics, 12 hours

AQUA

EXSC

313
404
292
294

Biomechanics of Aquatics  
Lifeguard Instructor (LGI) 
Anatomy  
Anatomical Kinesiology  

2
3
3
3

1 hour from

AQUA





PEP

213
219
314
316
317
458
326

Introduction to Sailing (1) 
Aquatic Sports Officiating (1) 
Teaching and Coaching Swimming (2) 
Aquatic Fitness Instructor (3) 
Diving Waterpolo Synchro Swim (3) 
Aquatic Leadership Development (3) 
Adapted Water Exercise (1)

1

     
12 hrs

Option 2: Administration of aquatics, 12 hours

AQUA


      

404   
455
457
458

Lifeguard Instructor (LGI)  
Aquatic Faciities Management 
Aquatic Facility Design  
Aquatic Leadership Development

3
3
2
3

1 hour from

AQUA





PEP

219
255
260
316
317
456
326

Aquatic Sports Officiating (1)
Practicum in Aquatics (2) 
Emergency Responder (3)
Aquatic Fitness Instructor (3)
Diving Waterpolo Synchro Swim (3)
Camp Waterfront Administration (2)
Adapted Water Exercise (1)

1

     
12 hrs

Option 3: Scuba, 12 hours

AQUA



EXSC

220
221
224
355
292

Open Water Scuba 
Advanced SCUBA Diver 
Divemaster 
Internship in Aquatics (1-3)  
Anatomy

2
2
2
3
3

     

12 hrs
     

24 hrs

MINOR IN GERONTOLOGY, 21 hours

PREFIX 

NO 

SHORT TITLE 

CR HRS 

12 hours from core courses   

GERO


430
435
445 
499

Adaptations in Later Life
Aging in Communities
Health Wellness and Aging
Internship in Gerontology (1-6)

3
3
3
3

9 hours of electives from approved courses   

EDPS
EXSC 
FCFC

FCFN

FCPM
GERO

HSC

MKG

POLS
SOC

430 
493
202
250
210
340
315
415
440
468
471
300
310
350
341
431

Mental Health (3) 
Advanced Exercise Physiology (3)
Family Wellness (3)
Family Relations (3)
Customer Service (3)
Prin of Human Nutrition (3)
Sr Housing: Design, Mkg, & Mgt (3)
Technology in Aging (3)
Women and Aging (3)
Consumer Health Issues (3)
Death and Dying (3)
Principles of Marketing (3)
Consumer Behavior (3)
Public Administration (3)
Sociology of Health & Illness (3)
Aging and the Life Course (3)

9

     

21 hrs
       

MINOR IN SPORTS MEDICINE, 23 hours

PREFIX 

NO   

SHORT TITLE

CR HRS

AT



EXSC

PEP

240
370
371
373
292
294
250

Prevention and Care of Injury 
Lower Ext Ortho Eval in AT 
Upper Ext Ortho Eval in AT 
Therapeutic Exercise in AT
Anatomy 
Anatomical Kinesiology  
First Aid 

3
3
3
3
3
3
2

3 hours from

EXSC

FCFN

329
360
340

Assessment for Ind with Dis (3)
Exercise Psychology (3) 
Prin of Human Nutrition (3)

3

     

23 hrs
Not open to athletic training majors.   

MINOR IN WORKPLACE WELLNESS, 20-22 hours

PREFIX 

NO 

SHORT TITLE 

CR HRS

WWIN




201 
305
310
396
397
498

Improving Worker Wellbeing
Intro to WW Planning
Workplace Wellness Admin
Civ Engag: Workplc Wellns Prg
Civ Engag: Workplc Wellns Prj
Sr Seminar Workplace Wellness

3
3
3
3
3
1

4-6 hours from directed electives   

COMM 

CPSY
EDTE
EXSC
FCFN

HSC







NUR


PEP
PSYS

SOC
TDPT
WWIN

251
351
230
204
201
275
340
160
180
250
465
467
472
481
482
103
201
299X
250
213
373
329
360
405
496

Bus and Prof Comm (3) 
Organizational Communication (3)
Human Relation Development (3)
Sel & Mgt of Tech Resources (3)
Physical Fitness Assessment (3)
Personal Nutrition (3)
Prin of Human Nutrition (3)
Fundamentals of Human Health (3)
Principles of Community Health (3)
Emergency Health Care (3)
Alcohol Problems (3)
Drug Dependency and Abuse (3)
Women and Health (3)
Stress Management (3)
Environmental Health (3)
Health Behav: Cult Variations (3)
Compl/Altern Hlth Mdlities (2)
Exp/Dev Topics (1-6)
First Aid (2)
Psych of Human Adjustment (3)
Industrial Psychology (3)
Work and Society (3)
Industrial Safety and Health (3)
Workplace Wellness Coaching (3)
Seminar in Workplace Wellness (1-6)

4-6

     

20-22 hrs

TEACHER EDUCATION

Teaching programs require additional courses in educational methods. See the Department of Educational Studies and Teachers College for the descriptions of these courses and other professional requirements. In addition, teaching majors must complete all Decision Point requirements. Technology expenses are required.

Physical Education Teacher Education-Decision Point Requirements

Decision Point 1:

  • Completion of PEP 161 with a C or better.
  • Satisfactorily complete first level of portfolio review.
  • Disposition Evaluation.

Decision Point 2:

  • CASA passed.  
  • Overall GPA of 3.0 in at least 45 hours.
  • GPA of 2.5 in major.
  • Satisfactorily complete second level of portfolio review (Physical Education Content Standards).
  • Meet fitness testing requirement in PEP 101.
  • C or better in 100/200-level professional education courses (EDMU 205, EDPS 250, PEP 209, 227, 291).
  • C or better in COMM 210.
  • Approval of application for admission to teaching curriculum.
  • Declaration of teaching major via Degree Works.
  • Disposition Evaluations will occur in PEP 158, 209, 227, and 291. Must be at basic level.

Decision Point 3

  • Overall GPA of 3.0 in at least 93 hours.
  • GPA of 2.5 in professional education courses.
  • GPA of 2.5 in major.
  • Completion of Writing Proficiency Program.
  • Within 9 hours of completion of content courses.
  • Satisfactorily complete third level of portfolio review (Physical Education Content Standards).
  • Disposition Evaluations will occur in PEP 327, 394, 395, and 399. No unsatisfactory ratings and some proficiencies expected. 
  • Meet fitness testing requirement in PEP 102 and 103.
  • Current CPR/First Aid Certification.

Decision Point 4 (after student teaching):

  • Satisfactorily complete fourth level of portfolio review.
  • Overall GPA of 3.0.
  • GPA of 2.5 in major. 
  • Current state licensure exams.
  • Complete all degree requirements.

Approval from student teaching supervisor and University supervisor for graduation.

TEACHING MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (ALL-GRADE), 60 hours

PREFIX 

NO   

SHORT TITLE

CR HRS

EXSC

PEP













292
293
158
161
194
209
227
244
250
291
310
327
391
394
395
399
400

Anatomy 
Found Physiology and Exercise  
Teaching Dance and Gymnastics 
Found/Prin of Physical Educ
Obs Analysis of Motor Skills 
Intro to Teaching Physical Ed 
Intro Adapted Physical Ed/Act  
Current Issues in Physical Ed 
First Aid 
Motor Development 
Evaluation in Physical Educ 
Assess in Adapted Phys Ed/Act 
Motor Learning 
Teaching Phys Educ in Elem Sch 
Teaching Phys Ed Middle Sch 
Teaching Phys Ed High Sch 
Curr Design in Physical Educ 

3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
2
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
2

     

47 hrs
 
Activity core, 10 hours

AQUA 

214
or
215 

Beginning Swimming (1)

Intermediate Swimming (1) 

1

PEP
   
 
 

222
232
242
252

Field and Court Invasion Games 
Net and Wall Games  
Teaching Outdoor Ed/Activities 
Teaching Fitness Activities

2
2
2
3

     

10 hrs
 
3 hours from

AQUA
HSC 
PEP

315
160
494

Water Safety Instructor (WSI) (3)  
Fundamentals of Human Health (3)
Programming in Adapted PE (3)

3

     

60 hrs

ALL-GRADE EDUCATION PROGRAM

PREFIX 

NO   

SHORT TITLE

CR HRS

Education core, 24 hours

EDAL
EDFO
EDMU
EDPS

EDSE

470
420
205
250
390
465

Student Teaching: All-Grade (6-7)  
Soc, Hist, Phil Found of Ed  
Intro to Multicul Ed  
Human Growth Development 
Educational Psychology 
Elective Student Teaching (3 or 5)

7
3
3
3
3
5

     

24 hrs
See Professional Education Assessment/Decision Points, for additional information. 

SECONDARY PHYSICAL EDUCATION LICENSE, 28 hours

Must have or be working on a secondary health license.

PREFIX 

NO   

SHORT TITLE

CR HRS

PEP



 

222
or
232
242
252

Field and Court Invasion Games (2) 
   
Net and Wall Games (2)  
Teaching Outdoor Ed/Activities 
Teaching Fitness Activities

2
2
3

PEP






194
227
244
310
391
395
399
400

Obs Analysis of Motor Skills 
Intro Adapted Physical Ed/Act  
Current Issues in Physical Ed 
Evaluation in Physical Educ 
Motor Learning 
Teaching Phys Ed Middle Sch 
Teaching Phys Ed High Sch 
Curr Design in Physical Educ

2
3
3
2
3
3
3
2

     

28 hrs
Must meet content area requirements. Student teach in both physical education and health. 

AQUATICS (AQUA)

120 Aquatics Special Topics/Workshop (1-3)
Designed to consider a variety of different issues, problems, and skills in aquatics. Offerings have included but are not limited to: special water rescue, SCUBA archeology, underwater navigation, search and recovery, introduction to cave diving, technical SCUBA diving, and first responder instructor. 
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term.

190 Introduction to Aquatics (3)
An introduction to such topics as career opportunities, industry trends, and industry practice. Aquatics concepts, theory, and publications will be discussed. Aquatic related terminology, research, and fundamentals to aquatic oversight are studied. Lab fee required. 

213 Introduction to Sailing (1)
Provides entry-level knowledge and skills about sailing small sailboats. Students learn how to assemble (rig), care for, and sail a small sailboat.

214 Beginning Swimming (1)
Introduces nonswimmers or novices to basic skills and strokes of swimming and diving. 
    Not open to deep water swimmers.

215 Intermediate Swimming (1)
Designed for all physical education majors and aquatic students looking to improve their stroke techniques. Emphasizes basic performance techniques in swimming, diving, and aquatic skills. Prepares students for success in the AQUA 315 (WSI) course.                 
    Prerequisite: successful completion of entry-level skills tests. 

216 Lifeguard Training (3)
Teaches the skills and knowledge necessary to become a certified lifeguard. Includes CPR, FA, AED, 02, and PDT Training. Advanced topics include techniques for open water and surf rescue. Lab fee required. 
    Prerequisite: successful completion of intermediate swimming skills test.

217 Canoe and Kayak (1)
Introduction to movement control of canoes/kayaks, including skill techniques, environmental and safety factors of small water craft. Self-rescue techniques for small water craft emergencies. Lab fee required. 
    Prerequisite: successful completion of entry-level swimming test.

219 Aquatic Sports Officiating (1)
An introduction to the theory and practice of officiating swimming and springboard diving. 

220 Open Water Scuba (2)
Beginning scuba composed of lecture sessions, confined water (pool), and open water sessions. Provides a level of understanding to participate in skin and scuba diving activities safely. Special fee required. 
    Prerequisite: successful completion of entry-level skills test.

221 Advanced SCUBA Diver (2)
Series of open water dives and lectures on advanced diving and lifesaving subjects. Lab fee required. 
    Prerequisite: AQUA 220 or basic level certification with permission of the instructor.

224 Divemaster (2)
Provides knowledge and practical experience needed to lead scuba activities. Includes experience in classroom, pool, and open water activities. 
    Prerequisite: AQUA 221 or permission of the program coordinator.

225 Assistant Scuba Instructor (2)
Provides experience and knowledge necessary to teach scuba diving. The student works with and under the guidance of a SCUBA instructor Trainer. Includes experience in classroom, pool, and open water activities. 
    Prerequisite: AQUA 224; permission of the program coordinator.

255 Practicum in Aquatics (2)
Administrative and teaching experience at Ball State University or another approved aquatic program as deemed appropriate by the aquatic coordinator.         
    Prerequisite: AQUA 315 and permission of the coordinator of the aquatics program.                 
    Open only to aquatic degree students. 

260 Emergency Responder (3)
Provides knowledge and experiences in Emergency Medical Responder skills. Instruction includes training in assessment, CPR, First Aid, Automated External Defibrillation, Oxygen administration, and other advanced care. This is not a state-sanctioned Emergency Medical Responder course.  

301 Instructor of CPR and First Aid (2)
Emphasizes teaching methodologies and delivery of nationally recognized programs in first aid, CPR, and bloodborne pathogens. Instructor certification available.         
    Prerequisite: current basic level first aid and CPR certification.  

313 Biomechanics of Aquatics (2)
Provides an opportunity to observe, participate, experiment with, and apply biomechanical principles in swimming. Students will be able to observe and evaluate competitive swimming, competitive diving, recreational swimming, and therapeutic exercise.

314 Teaching and Coaching Swimming (2)
Focuses on the application of skills, tactics, and strategies of competitive swimming.

315 Water Safety Instructor (WSI) (3)
Swimming and rescue skills necessary to complete certification for a Water Safety Instructor program. Emphasizes a broad range of other aquatic experiences and teaching methodologies. Lab fee required.                 
    Prerequisite: successful completion of swimming test. 

316 Aquatic Fitness Instructor (3)
Introduction to the objectives, format, and water exercise classes, emphasizing participation and application of fitness and related concepts to selected water aerobic activities. Lab fee required for certification.                 
    Prerequisite: successful completion of swimming test the first week of class. 

317 Teaching Diving, Water Polo, and Synchro Swim (3)
Provides technical instruction for springboard diving, water polo and synchronized swimming. Provides students with the understanding and safety involved with instruction in these areas.

355 Internship in Aquatics (1-3)
Permits credit for aquatic experiences in categories of leadership, administration, or operation of aquatic programs or facilities.         
    Prerequisite: AQUA 221; permission of the program coordinator.         
    A total of 3 hours of credit may be earned.         
    Open only to scuba minor students.  

404 Lifeguard Instructor (LGI) (3)
Trains students to be Lifeguard Instructors. Training includes LG, CPR, FA, AED, 02, and PDT skills. Advanced topics include open water and surf techniques. Certification available upon successful completion. Lab fee required.

454 Swimming Pool Operation and Maintenance (3)
Provides information on pool circulation, filtration, sanitation, and administrative procedures for the pool operator or aquatics specialist. Opportunity to earn operation credentials with successful completion.

455 Aquatic Facilities Management and Programming (3)
Study of organization and administration to prepare the aquatic professional for management of indoor and outdoor facilities. Includes facility inspection, safety and sanitation procedures, and activity, sport, and recreational aspects of pools, lakes, camps, and beach fronts.

456 Camp Waterfront Administration (2)
A study in camp specific programming, waterfront safety, design, and administration.

457 Aquatic Facility Design (2)
A study in swimming pools, their design, and utilization. Includes lighting, basin design, and deck construction for commercial pools. No previous architecture experience required.

458 Aquatic Leadership and Staff Development (3)
Provides information to become an effective leader. Aquatic facility financial management is discussed in depth, as accounting principles apply to aquatic facilities. Certification for aquatic leadership is available if the student meets the required qualifications. Lab fee required.

479 Aquatics Internship (12)
Full-time work and learning practical experience on- or off-campus in an aquatic-related setting. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the program coordinator. 
    Open only to aquatic degree students.

ATHLETIC TRAINING (AT)

196 Introduction to Athletic Training (2)
Introduction to the profession of athletic training. Daily responsibilities and occupational opportunities for the athletic trainer are discussed. Laboratory experiences include basic skills needed for a beginning athletic training student. A requirement for application to the Athletic Training program.

240 (340) Prevention and Care of Musculoskeletal Injuries (3)
Introduction to the prevention, recognition, evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation of common musculoskeletal injuries and conditions. Laboratory experiences emphasize the following: basic injury evaluation and management, preventative stretching techniques, bracing methods, spinal stabilization, splinting, and equipment fitting techniques.  

250 Application of Taping, Wrapping, and Protective Devices in Athletic Training (1)
A laboratory course designed to facilitate learning of the knowledge and skills required to effectively tape, wrap, or apply any protective devices to a patient in an athletic training setting. Focuses on theory and skill acquisition in order to become competent in this area.         
    Prerequisite: AT 196 and 240; admission to the athletic training program.  

260 Clinical Education in Athletic Training 1 (2)
Guided experiences in athletic training, which includes the application of knowledge and skills in the following domains: prevention; clinical evaluation and diagnosis; immediate care, treatment, rehabilitation, and reconditioning; organization and administration; and professional responsibilities.         
    Prerequisite: AQUA 260 and AT 196 and 240 and ANAT 201; admission into the athletic training program.  

261 Clinical Education in Athletic Training 2 (2)
Guided experiences in athletic training, which includes the application of knowledge and skills in the following domains; prevention, clinical evaluation and diagnosis, immediate care, treatment, rehabilitation, and reconditioning, organization and administration, and professional responsibilities.         
    Prerequisite: AT 260 and 370.                 
    Open only to athletic training majors. 

360 Clinical Education in Athletic Training 3 (2)
Guided experiences in athletic training, which includes the application of knowledge and skills in the following domains: prevention, clinical evaluation and diagnosis, immediate care, treatment, rehabilitation, and reconditioning, organization and administration, and professional responsibilities.         
    Prerequisite: AT 260 and 261 and 370 and 371.                 
    Open only to athletic training majors.

370 Lower Extremity Orthopedic Evaluation in Athletic Training (3)
Procedures and techniques for recognition and evaluation of orthopedic injuries and conditions to the lower extremities. Laboratory experiences emphasize the methods and techniques in evaluating lower extremity injuries/conditions. A clinical experience component is required for students in the professional phase of the Athletic Training program. 
    Prerequisite: AT 240; ANAT 201 or EXSC 292; permission of the instructor.

371 Upper Extremity Orthopedic Evaluation in Athletic Training (3)
Procedures and techniques for recognition and evaluation of orthopedic injuries and conditions to the upper extremities. Laboratory experiences emphasize the methods and techniques in evaluating upper extremity injuries/conditions. A clinical experience component is required for students in the professional phase of the Athletic Training program. 
    Prerequisite: AT 240; ANAT 201 or EXSC 292; permission of the instructor.

372 Therapeutic Modalities in Athletic Training (3)
Examination of the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries and conditions through the use of cryotherapy, hydrotherapy, and electrotherapy. Laboratory experiences emphasize the application of therapeutic physical agents and modalities. A clinical experience component is required for students in the professional phase of the Athletic Training program. 
    Prerequisite: AT 370, 371; permission of the instructor. 
    Open only to athletic training majors admitted into the professional preparation program.

373 Therapeutic Exercise and Techniques in Athletic Training (3)
Examination of the comprehensive rehabilitation of orthopedic injuries and conditions using therapeutic exercise and manual therapy techniques. Laboratory experiences emphasize the application of rehabilitation principles for treatment of common orthopedic injuries/conditions. A clinical experience component is required for students in the professional phase of the Athletic Training program. 
    Prerequisite: AT 370, 371; permission of the instructor.

374 (498) Organization and Administration of Athletic Training (3)
Understanding of risk management, healthcare delivery mechanisms, insurance, reimbursement, documentation, patient privacy, and facility management as it relates to athletic trainers functioning within the context of a complex healthcare system.         
    Prerequisite: AT 370 and 371 and 372.         
    Open only to athletic training majors.  

392 Practicum 1 in Athletic Training (1-3)
Under the supervision of a preceptor, the student develops knowledge and clinical skills relevant to athletic training practice in 1-2 healthcare settings.         
    Prerequisite: AT 260 and 261 and 370 and 371.         
    A total of 3 hours of credit may be earned.         
    Open only to athletic training majors.  

460 Clinical Education in Athletic Training 4 (2)
Guided experiences in athletic training, which includes the application of knowledge and skills in the following domains: prevention, clinical evaluation and diagnosis, immediate care, treatment, rehabilitation, and reconditioning, organization and administration, and professional responsibilities.         
    Prerequisite: AT 260 and 261 and 360 and 370 and 371 and 372 and 373.         
    Open only to athletic training majors.

477 Psychosocial Aspects of Sports Medicine (3)
Presents a variety of psychological and sociological factors related to working with patients and athletes in exercise and sports settings, including recognition of abnormal social, emotional, and mental behaviors as well as the ability to intervene and refer these individuals as necessary.         
    Parallel: AT 373.         
    Open only to athletic training majors.  

492 Practicum 2 in Athletic Training (1-3)
Under the supervision of a preceptor, the student develops knowledge and clinical skills relevant to athletic training practice in 1-2 health care settings.         
    Prerequisite: AT 260 and 261 and 360 and 370 and 371 and 372 and 373.         
    A total of 3 hours of credit may be earned.         
    Open only to athletic training majors.  

494 (398) Clinical Integration in Athletic Training (1)
A laboratory course designed to facilitate the integration of knowledge, skill, and clinical decision making into simulated patient care experiences using the principles associated with evidence-based practice.         
    Prerequisite: AT 370 and 371 and 372 and 373 and 374.         
    Open only to athletic training majors.  

495 Medical and Pharmacological Aspects of Athletic Training (4)
Develops the medical and pharmacological knowledge and clinical skills that athletic trainers must possess to diagnose, treat, and refer patients with general medical illness/injuries. Laboratory experiences focus on the application of medical and pharmacological knowledge and the clinical skills used to diagnose, treat, and refer patients with medical illness/injuries.         
    Prerequisite: AT 370 and 371 and 372 and 373 and 392.                 
    Open only to athletic training majors. 

496 Clinical Experience in Athletic Training (1-6)
Advanced athletic training clinical experiences in a variety of athletic training clinical settings. 
    Prerequisite: AT 240, 370, 371, 372, 373; permission of the instructor. 
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned. 
    Open only to athletic training majors.

497 Clinical Decision Making in Athletic Training (2)
Capstone course for the advanced athletic training student. Current topics in sports medicine, athletic training research, and professional responsibilities are investigated to develop clinical decision-making skills based on sound evidence.         
    Prerequisite: AT 370 and 371 and 372 and 373.                 
    Open only to athletic training majors.

EXERCISE SCIENCE (EXSC)

119 Hatha Yoga (1)
Introduction to yoga postures, breathing, and relaxation techniques, including the therapeutic use of hatha yoga, its importance to the fitness/wellness profession, and the correct technique of teaching basic poses.

147 Weight Training (1)
Designed to gain understanding of strength training through method and application.

148 Group Fitness Instructor (1)
Develops practical knowledge and skills necessary to instruct group fitness programs through active participation.

190 Foundations of Exercise Science (3)
An introduction to such topics as career opportunities, exercise, nutrition, life-style changes, related professional organization and publications, physiological and psychological research, and other current information for wellness and fitness professionals. Topics vary for each exercise science option. 

201 Physical Fitness Concepts and Assessment (3) 
An introduction to the knowledge and skills necessary to administer physical fitness assessments.                 
    Prerequisite: EXSC 292 or ANAT 201.

212 Games and Activities for the Older Adult (1)
Designed to acquaint students with a variety of recreational activities suitable for the older adult. 
    Prerequisite: any PFW course.

292 Anatomy (3)
Introduction to human anatomy. Provides basic knowledge upon which physiological biomechanical concepts can be built.

293 Foundations of Physiology and Exercise (3)
Presents an introduction to exercise physiology by providing a basic overview of systems physiology at rest, along with the acute responses and chronic adaptations in these systems that are brought about by exercise.         
    Prerequisite: EXSC 292 or ANAT 201.  

294 Anatomical Kinesiology (3)
Focuses on understanding how structure of the human body determines its function, how movement is produced, the relationship to injury, and how exercise can maintain, rehabilitate, and improve body structure.         
    Prerequisite: EXSC 292 or ANAT 201.  

301 Fundamentals of Exercise Prescription (3) 
Emphasizes the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively develop and implement an appropriate exercise prescription for adults.                 
    Prerequisite: advanced program status, permission of the program coordinator. 

312 Teaching Physical Activity to the Older Adult (2)
Designed to teach students to recognize the characteristics of the older adult and to successfully plan, implement, and evaluate a program of physical activity based upon the special needs of the older adult. 
    Prerequisite: EXSC 212.

320 Fundamentals of Resistance Training (3)
Advanced knowledge in resistance training program design and implementation emphasizing the physiological and biomechanical aspects of resistance training.         
    Prerequisite: EXSC 147 and 292 or ANAT 201 and EXSC 293.                 
    Open only to exercise science majors. 

329 Program Development/Fitness Assessment for Individuals with Disabilities (3)
Designed to provide learning experiences associated with fitness assessment, program development in implementation for individuals with disabilities in a clinical setting. Recommended for exercise science, athletic training, and pre-physical therapy majors. 
    Prerequisite: EXSC 201 or permission of the instructor.

360 Exercise Psychology (3)
Introduction to the psychosocial issues related to exercise behaviors emphasizing intervention strategies. Covers information relevant to competencies related to effective exercise leadership as well as adherence methods and techniques for exercise participants. 
    Open only to exercise science majors.

401 Principles of the Electrocardiogram (3)
Introduction to the basic principles and interpretation of the electrocardiogram (ECG) as it relates to clinical and fitness programs.         
    Prerequisite: EXSC 293.                 
    Open only to exercise science majors. 

402 Advanced Fitness Assessments in Exercise Science (3)
An advanced laboratory-based course designed to introduce rationale, procedures, and interpretation of health fitness assessments. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the program coordinator. 
    Open only to exercise science majors.

414 Biomechanics of Human Movement (3)
Application of fundamental biomechanical principles to the human musculoskeletal system. Topics include musculoskeletal mechanics and quantitative analysis of human movement.                 
    Prerequisite: EXSC 292 or ANAT 201 and EXSC 293 and 294 and PHYC 110. 

479 Exercise Science Internship (12)
Full-time work and learning on- or off-campus practical experience in an exercise science setting. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the program coordinator. 
    Open only to exercise science majors.

493 Advanced Concepts in Exercise Physiology (3)
The effect of exercise on the anatomical structures and the physiological functions in humans during acute and chronic activity.                 
    Prerequisite: EXSC 292 or ANAT 201 and EXSC 293.

GERONTOLOGY (GERO)  

392 Workshop in Applied Gerontology (1-6) 
Preservice or inservice education in selected areas of applied gerontology using a workshop or independent study format of concentrated study, presentation, demonstration, and practice. Specific content depends upon the problems or interest area the format addresses. Learners are encouraged to work out programs of personal study with help from other resource persons.         
    Prerequisite: permission of the program director.         
    Credit may be applied to the minor in gerontology only with permission of the program director for gerontology at the Fisher Institute for Wellness and Gerontology.         
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.  

398 Topical Seminar in Applied Gerontology (1-6)
Investigation of topics, problems, or issues in applied gerontology with discussion by all seminar participants under the guidance of the instructor.         
    Credit may be applied to the minor in gerontology only with permission of the program director for gerontology at the Fisher Institute for Wellness and Gerontology.         
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.  

415 Technology in Aging (3)
Explores the impact of assistive and other technologies on the lives of aging adults. Identification of technologies, utilization by and for aging adults, and implications for service delivery will be explored.  

430 Aging Well: Adaptations in Later Life (3)
Examination of adaptations of last half of the life span. Includes various theories of aging, multidimensional perspectives on changes in well-being and health, and strategies for coping with the change. Emphases are placed on developmental process, adaptations, and mental/emotional changes as people age.  

435 Aging in Communities (3)
Focus on community aging as it applies to all dimensions of life: biological, physiological, sociological, psychological, political, occupational, economical, educational, familial, and societal.

440 Women and Aging (3)
Typical lifespan occurrences that largely impact women such as elder caregiving, familial systems maintenance, widowhood, health changes, and economic issues will be explored. Historical and theoretical perspectives; introduction to health, psychological, and living issues; introduction to racial and ethnic diversity; and social relationships will also be covered.  

445 Health, Wellness, and Aging (3)
Will increase knowledge of health, wellness, and aging covering topics such as health status, health behavior, health risk factors, clinical preventive services, public health, and job opportunities in health and aging.  

499 Internship in Gerontology (1-6)
Experience in one or more of the agencies, institutions, or programs now providing gerontological services or otherwise related to the field of gerontology. The internship is carried out under the joint supervision of the program director for gerontology and a practitioner representing the agency, institution, or program. Each student chooses the internship setting with guidance from a faculty sponsor and approval of the practitioner.         
    Prerequisite: permission of the program director for gerontology at the Fisher Institute for Wellness and Gerontology.                
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION: PROFESSIONAL (PEP)

101 Fitness Test 1 (0)
Health related fitness test. Offered credit/no credit only. 
    Open only to physical education teaching majors or by permission of the coordinator.

102 Fitness Test 2 (0)
Health related fitness test. Offered credit/no credit only. 
    Parallel: PEP 310.
    Open only to physical education teaching majors or by permission of the coordinator. 

103 Fitness Test 3 (0)
Health related fitness test. Offered credit/no credit only. 
    Parallel: PEP 399.
    Open only to physical education teaching majors or by permission of the coordinator.

120 Physical Education Workshop (1-3)
A course designed to consider a variety of different issues and problems in physical education sport; and workshop offerings such as officiating and judging, athletic administration, recreational leadership, contemporary sports activities, and specialized coaching, etc. 
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term.

157 Tumbling and Apparatus (1)
Introduction to basic techniques and progressions in tumbling and apparatus.

158 Teaching Dance and Gymnastics (3)
Introduction to teaching dance and gymnastics for the physical educator. Provides physical education teaching majors a developmentally appropriate scope and sequence for teaching dance (K-12) in today's schools. Also provides comprehensive skill instruction for teaching gymnastics in a safe environment.         
    Prerequisite: permission of the coordinator.                 
    Open only to physical education teaching majors. 

161 Foundations and Principles of Physical Education (3)
Introduction to the field of physical education and the physical education teaching major to include development of portfolios. Field experience required. 
    Open only to physical education teaching majors or permission of the coordinator. 

164 Life Skills for Student Athletes (3)
Introduces personal values and health concepts affecting both academic and athletic performance. Life skills such as values and value clarification, diversity, communication skills, decision making, time and stress management, alcohol and other drug/addiction education, sexuality issues, sport nutrition, and career development issues are addressed.

194 Observational Analysis of Motor Skills (2)
Introduction to biomechanical principles used to accurately observe skill performance in physical education and coaching settings. Includes laboratory experience. 
    Open only to physical education teaching majors.

205 Introduction to Sport in American Life (3)
A thorough examination of the various historical, sociological, and psychological aspects of sports in our society. Not sport-appreciation oriented, but rather an examination of what occurs to both competitors and spectators as they become involved with a sport activity. 
    Open to all undergraduate students. 
    Not open to students who have credit in HIST 205.

209 Introduction to Teaching Physical Education (3)
Introduction to content development, teaching styles, and assessment within the areas of games and rhythms primarily in the elementary school curriculum. Field experience required. 
    Prerequisite: PEP 161; permission of the coordinator. 
    Open only to physical education teaching majors and elementary education wellness concentration program students.

218 Developmental Aquatics for Preschoolers (1)
Through lecture and pool laboratory experience, provides a model for aquatic instruction with a motor development basis for preschool children.

222 Teaching Field and Court Invasion Games (2)
Focuses on skill development and teaching methodology for selected field and court invasion games (e.g., soccer, basketball, team handball, flag football, floor hockey). Includes laboratory experience. 
    Prerequisite: PEP 161; permission of the coordinator. 
    Open only to physical education teaching majors.

226 Disability Sport (1)
Provides a working knowledge of the official sports organizations recognized by the United States Olympic Committee. Emphasizes classifications, organizational structure, sporting events, and coaching athletes with disabilities.

227 Introduction to Adapted Physical Education/Activity (3)
Introductory knowledge of disabilities with emphasis on referral, placement, and programming in physical education and physical activity; relevant federal and state laws that pertain to the education and physical education of students with disabilities; and activity programming across the lifespan. Students are required to participate in field experiences. 
    Open only to physical education, exercise science, and special education majors or by permission of the instructor.

231 Principles and Philosophies of Coaching Sports (3)
Based on two domains of the National Coaching Standards; covers principles and philosophies underlying coaching at the interscholastic level.

232 Teaching Net and Wall Games (2)
Focuses on skill development and teaching methodology for selected net and wall games (e.g., tennis, badminton, pickleball, volleyball). Includes laboratory experience. 
    Open only to physical education teaching majors and elementary education wellness concentration students.

242 Teaching Outdoor Education and Lifelong Activities (2)
Introduction to skill development, teaching methodology, and curricular models for outdoor education (e.g., challenges and initiatives, hiking, orienteering, etc.) and lifelong activities (e.g., golf, disc golf, softball, bowling, bocce ball, buka ball, etc.) through participation and guided reflection.         
    Prerequisite: permission of the coordinator.         
    Open only to physical education teaching majors.  

244 Current Issues in Physical Education (3)
Introduction to the diversity, psychological, and sociological issues related to physical education. Topics will examine a variety of factors that influence teacher effectiveness, student learning, and classroom management. Provides opportunities to plan and implement pedagogical and curricular strategies for a variety of diverse populations.         
    Prerequisite: permission of the coordinator.                 
    Open only to physical education teaching majors. 

250 First Aid (2)
First aid, CPR, and Bloodborne Pathogens Training and certification as outlined by nationally recognized agencies. Designed for majors or minors in the School of Physical Education, Sport, and Exercise Science. Core Transfer Library: Health and Physical Education (IHP 1401) 
    Not open to students who have credit in HSC 250. 

252 Teaching Physical Fitness and Fitness Activities (3)
Introduction to major fitness technology, training principles, youth fitness and appropriate fitness instruction/assessment in a physical education (K-12) setting for the physical educator.         
    Prerequisite: permission of the coordinator.                 
    Open only to physical education teaching majors. 

288 Practicum in Adaptive Physical Education 1: Survey/Introduction (1)
Provides an overview of practicum opportunities both on and off campus related to working with students with disabilities in a physical education/exercise setting. Will rotate approximately every five weeks across three practicum settings.

291 Motor Development (3)
Introduction to human motor development across the lifespan emphasizing major theoretical viewpoints; factors affecting motor development including physiological change, perceptual change, cognitive change, sociocultural practices, and intervention; and instruction and assessment of fundamental motor patterns in a laboratory setting. Includes laboratory experience. 
    Prerequisite: PEP 209; permission of the coordinator. 
    Open only to physical education teaching majors and elementary education wellness concentration program students.

299X Experimental/Developmental Topics (3-6)
Topics relevant to the discipline. Course titles will be announced before each semester. 
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.

310 Evaluation in Physical Education (2)
Measurement and evaluation in physical education with emphasis on underlying philosophy, tests, construction, and use of test results. 
    Prerequisite: meet decision point 2 requirements; permission of the coordinator.
    Parallel: PEP 102. 
    Open only to physical education teaching majors.

326 Adapted Water Exercise (1)
Concerned with methodologies used in water exercise for persons with disabilities. Important for aquatics instructors, rehabilitation personnel, pre-physical therapy, adapted physical education, exercise science, and athletic training. Concentrates on practical application. 
    Prerequisite: AQUA 315 or permission of the instructor.

327 Assessment for Adapted Physical Education/Activity (3)
Focus will be on establishing appropriate service for students with disabilities in physical education or physical activity through the assessment process. Experience in administration of motor and/or fitness assessments will occur. Students will be required to develop a detailed IEP, or long range fitness plan, assessment report, and programming recommendations. Students are required to participate in field experiences. 
    Prerequisite: PEP 227; physical education teacher education majors must meet decision point 2 requirements; permission of the coordinator. 
    Open only to physical education and special education majors.

328 Practicum in Adaptive Physical Education 2: Educational (1)
Focuses on an educational setting (community-based schools). Requires fulfilling a sixteen-week practicum assignment under the supervision of an adapted physical educator. Involvement with lesson plans, program development, and evaluation. 
    Prerequisite: PEP 288.

331 Organization and Planning for Coaching Sports (3)
Based on three domains of the National Coaching Standards; covers procedures involved in the organization, training, and planning of team and individual sports at the scholastic level. 
    Prerequisite: PEP 194, 231.

361 Dance for Children (2)
Basic rhythms, exploration of movement, and creative dance for the early grades of the elementary school.

366 Teaching and Coaching an Individual Sport (2)
Focuses on application of skills, tactics, and strategies of a specific individual sport (i.e., golf, track, swimming, diving). 

368 Teaching and Coaching a Team Sport (2)
Focuses on application of skills, tactics, and strategies of a specific team sport (i.e., basketball, volleyball, baseball, softball, football). 

385 Advanced Computer and Technology Applications in Physical Education (3)
Learning and application of advanced computer and technology skills such as advanced word processing, using the computer for presentations, worldwide communications, and designing interactive programs.

391 Motor Learning (3)
Introduction to principles related to the teaching, learning, and performance of motor skills. Emphasizes the application of this knowledge to teaching and learning strategies for motor-skill acquisition. 
    Prerequisite: physical education teaching majors must meet decision point 2 requirements; permission of the coordinator. 
    Open only to physical education teaching majors.

394 Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School (3)
Focuses on planning, teaching, and evaluating a developmental physical education program for elementary school students. Field experience required. 
    Prerequisite: PEP 291; physical education teaching majors must meet decision point 2 requirements; permission of the coordinator. 
    Open only to physical education teaching majors and elementary education and wellness concentration students. 

395 Teaching Physical Education in the Middle School (3)
Designed to analyze and develop teaching methods that enable the planning, implementation, and evaluation of an array of teaching strategies that would be used to create a safe environment for a middle school physical education program. Includes a 20-hour practicum in a middle school. 
    Prerequisite: PEP 394; meet decision point 2 requirements; permission of the coordinator. 
    Open only to physical education teaching majors.

399 Teaching Physical Education in the High School (3)
Designed to develop understanding in the ability to plan, implement, and evaluate a variety of teaching strategies to be used in establishing a positive learning environment for high school students. Includes a 20-hour practicum in a high school. 
    Prerequisite: PEP 394; meet decision point 2 requirements; permission of the coordinator. 
    Parallel: PEP 103. 
    Open only to physical education teaching majors.

400 Introduction to Curriculum Design in Physical Education (2)
Introduction to curriculum and curriculum design covering all facets of physical education in the K-12 setting. 
    Prerequisite: PEP 394; meet decision point 2 requirements; permission of the coordinator. 
    Open only to physical education teaching majors.

403 Seminar in Adapted Physical Education (2)
Designed to permit APE licensure students to consider current issues and topics in adapted physical education and activity. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson. 

409 Psychological/Social Issues in Sport (3)
Covers practical applications of the social and psychological issues which influence individual and/or team performance; content based on two domains of the National Coaching Standards and the NASPE/NASSM Standards for Sport Management Programs. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the program coordinator. 
    Open only to sport administration and aquatic majors.

433 Coaching Internship (3)
Assist in coaching competitive sports in schools. Includes supervised field-based experiences and in-depth classroom discussions centering on self-awareness and the teaching-coaching process. May not be taken at the same time as student teaching. 
    Prerequisite: current CPR/first aid certified or eligible for recertification; permission of the instructor.

471 Mainstreaming and Inclusion in Physical Education (3)
Designing physical education programs to meet the requirements of Public Law 101-476, IDEA, which requires that each child with disabilities have an individualized physical education program. 
    Prerequisite: PEP 227 or SPCE 201.

484 Practicum in Adaptive Physical Education 3: Clinical (1)
Focuses on a clinical emphasis in exercise and fitness for persons with disabilities. Requires a sixteen-week practicum assignment under the supervision of an adapted physical educator. Involves weight training, water exercise, and general fitness activity sessions for persons with disabilities. 
    Prerequisite: PEP 227 or permission of the instructor.

494 Programming in Adapted Physical Education and Activity (3)
Develop appropriate activities for students with disabilities in K-12 physical education and into adulthood through practical experience in educational and exercise environments. Students develop activities based on functional profile assessments, and provide appropriate modification and program delivery. Decision point 2 requirements apply to physical education students. Field experience participation required. 
    Prerequisite: PEP 227 and 327 or permission of the instructor. 
    Open only to physical education majors, special education majors or by permission of the instructor.

499 Independent Study in Physical Education (1-3)
An opportunity to investigate an area of particular interest to the student, under supervision of a faculty member. Extensive reading, research, analysis, and writing. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson. 
    A total of 3 hours of credit may be earned.

PHYSICAL FITNESS/WELLNESS (PFW)

100 Physical Conditioning (2)
Designed to develop physical fitness through twice weekly activity sessions. Focuses on a combination of muscular endurance/strength and cardiorespiratory endurance through the use of a variety of equipment commonly found in a commercial fitness facility. Includes one hour of lecture weekly containing a common core of knowledge concerning fitness and wellness. 
    Not open to students who have credit in PFW 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 117, 148, 160, 217.

101 Physical Fitness and Wellness Activity (1)
Designed to develop physical fitness through twice weekly aerobic activity sessions. May select physical conditioning, walking, jogging, aerobics, water aerobics, or swimming. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the PFW coordinator. 
    Not open to students who have credit in PFW 100, 103, 104, 105, 117, 148, 160, 217. 
    Open only to associate degree students.

102 Physical Fitness and Wellness Lecture (1)
Includes one hour of lecture weekly containing a common core of knowledge concerning fitness and wellness. Completes the PFW two-hour requirement for associate degree students pursuing a baccalaureate degree. 
    Prerequisite: PFW 101; permission of the PFW coordinator. 
    Not open to students who have credit in PFW 100, 103, 104, 105, 117, 148, 160, 217. 
    Open only to associate degree students.

103 Walking (2)
Designed to develop physical fitness through twice weekly aerobic walking sessions. Includes one hour of lecture weekly containing a common core of knowledge concerning fitness and wellness. 
    Not open to students who have credit in PFW 100, 101, 102, 104, 105, 117, 148, 160, 217.

104 Jogging (2)
Designed to develop physical fitness through twice weekly jogging sessions. Includes one hour of lecture weekly containing a common core of knowledge concerning fitness and wellness. 
    Not open to students who have credit in PFW 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 117, 148, 160, 217.

105 Adapted Physical Fitness and Wellness (2)
Designed to enable those with an impairment or disability to complete the PFW requirement. Includes one hour of lecture weekly containing a core of knowledge concerning fitness and wellness. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the adaptive coordinator. 
    Not open to students who have credit in PFW 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 117, 148, 160, 217. 
    Open only to students with disabilities.

117 Water Aerobics (2)
Designed to develop physical fitness through twice weekly water aerobics sessions. Ability to swim is not required. Includes one hour of lecture weekly containing a common core of knowledge concerning fitness and wellness. 
    Not open to students who have credit in PFW 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 148, 160, 217.

148 Aerobics (2)
Designed to develop physical fitness through twice weekly aerobic activity sessions. Includes one hour of lecture weekly containing a common core of knowledge concerning fitness and wellness. 
    Not open to students who have credit in PFW 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 117, 160, 217.

160 Individualized Physical Fitness and Wellness (1-2)
Limited to nontraditional students with special problems that may keep them from enrolling in a conventional physical fitness and wellness course. The activity component promotes the importance of being physically active for the development and maintenance of physical fitness. Contains a common core of knowledge concerning physical fitness and wellness. 
    Prerequisite: permission of PFW coordinator. 
    Not open to students who have credit in PFW 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 117, 148, 217.                
    A total of 2 hours of credit may be earned. 

217 Swimming (2)
Designed to develop physical fitness through twice weekly endurance (lap) swimming sessions. Includes one hour of lecture weekly containing a common core of knowledge concerning fitness and wellness. 
    Prerequisite: ability to swim at the intermediate level is required and successful completion of an entry-level skill test. 
    Not open to students who have credit in PFW 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 117, 148, 160.

SPORT ADMINISTRATION (SPTA)

190 Introduction to Sport Administration (3)
An introductory course that examines the organization and management of sport including the following areas: finance, law, ethics, facility management, event management, media relations, high school sports, collegiate sports, and recreational sports. Students will become familiar with career opportunities within the sport management field. 
    Open only to freshmen, sophomores, and junoirs, or by permission of the program coordinator.

195 Computer Applications for Sport Administration (2)
An introductory course in computer technology focused upon application software use in word processing, desktop publishing, presentation graphics, spreadsheets, and basic database management. Also includes an emphasis on the basics of operating systems and special applications of scheduling, statistical, and ticketing software unique to sport administration. 
    Prerequisite or parallel: SPTA 190. 
    Not open to students who have credit in ISOM 125 or CS 104. 

290 Revenue Generation in Sport (3)
An exploration and application of sport industry sales processes focused upon ticket sales, sponsorship sales, premium seating, and fundraising. Introduces the sales process including prospecting, calling, presenting, handling objections, negotiating, and closing. Making sales calls for a sport organization is an integral component of the class.         
    Open only to sport administration majors with full acceptance status.  

300 Sport Law (3)
Explores how the legal system applies to the sport industry and impacts managerial decisions. Topics covered include tort law, risk management, agency law, contract law, employment law, constitutional law, gender equity, intellectual property law, and antitrust law. Students will examine how prior cases impact future decisions.         
    Open only to sport administration majors with full acceptance status.  

303 Sport Marketing (3)
The application of basic principles of marketing to the managed sport industry with emphasis on intercollegiate athletics, professional sport and multisport club operations. Designed to provide students with a contemporary understanding of marketing principles as they are currently being applied in various sport management contexts.         
    Open only to sport administration majors with full acceptance status.  

305 Sport Finance (3)
A basic knowledge of the principles, processes, and strategies related to the economic and financial aspects of sport organizations. Introduces various financial aspects used in the current sport institutions and organizations including public subsidization of sports facilities, economic impact analysis, public-private partnerships, sources revenue for team operation, and related issues.         
    Open only to sport administration majors with full acceptance status.  

345 Sport Communication (3)
An overview of effective communication practices in the sport industry with an emphasis on the role of media and public relations within sport. Topics covered include developing public relations campaigns, creating media guides and press releases, managing relationships with the media, staging interviews and press conferences, and crisis communication.         
    Open only to sport administration majors with full acceptance status.  

402 Event and Facility Management in Sport (3)
Develops a student's understanding and knowledge of the competencies necessary to execute sporting events and manage sports facilities through theory and application. Topics covered include conceptualizing, planning, managing, and evaluating events. Students will plan and implement an event for students and the community.         
    Open only to sport administration majors with full acceptance status.  

448 Sport Governance (3)
Develops a contemporary understanding of governing bodies, leadership, ethical decision making, and policy at all levels of sport. Emphasis is placed on governance issues specific to youth/community, amateur, intercollegiate, Olympic/international, and professional sport organizations.         
    Open only to sport administration majors with full acceptance status.  

479 Sport Administration Internship (12)
A supervised work and learning experience in the application of sport management knowledge and skills. Internships are to be completed with organizations within the sport industry approved by the program coordinator including professional, collegiate, interscholastic, and amateur organizations.         
    Prerequisite: students must possess senior status (90 credit hours). Requires approval of program coordinator.         
    Open only to sport administration majors with full acceptance status.  

485 Sport Management (3)
Explores organizational management issues related to sport. Organizational theory topics include organizing, planning, decision making, human resources, leadership, program evaluation, and organizational effectiveness. Students will apply these topics to sport organizations and to their own career path through professional development exercises.                 
    Open only to sport administration majors with full acceptance status.

499 Independent Study in Sport Administration (1-3)
An opportunity to investigate an area of particular interest to the student, under supervision of a faculty member in sport administration. Extensive reading, research, analysis, and writing. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson. 
    A total of 3 hours of credit may be earned. 
    Open only to sport administration students.

WELLNESS (WELN)

325 Community Collaboration and Service Learning in Wellness Management (3)
During this course, students assist in a community-based, professionally led wellness management project.

WORKPLACE WELLNESS INTERDISCIPLINARY (WWIN)

201 Improving Worker Wellbeing: A Multidisciplinary Approach (3)
Many workplace issues influence worker wellbeing. Designed to introduce how workplace culture, safety, and occupational health policies, personal health-related decisions, and other related practices have the potential of influencing worker wellbeing.

305 Introduction to Workplace Wellness Planning (3)
Using a systematic planning model when developing programs is important for program success. This course introduces students to a logic-model driven planning approach and to the concept of health and productivity management.     
    Prerequisite: WWIN 201.

310 Workplace Wellness Administration (3)
Improving the efficiency of administrative tasks and communication practices can greatly impact Wellness Management practice. Focuses on enhancing skills and technologies important for program administration.     
    Prerequisite: WWIN 201.

396 Civic Engagement: Workplace Wellness Program (3)
Students assist in an ongoing, community-based, professionally led workplace wellness program setting. A combination of class meetings and practical experience provides valuable insight into workplace wellness practices.     
    Prerequisite: WWIN 305, 310.

397 Civic Engagement: Workplace Wellness Project (3)
Participants will assist with delivering a short-term wellness campaign to help improve awareness. Students will learn how these short-term campaigns are vital in bringing new people into wellness programs and have different goals than seen in the day-to-day operations of a wellness program.     
    Prerequisite: WWIN 305, 310.

405 Workplace Wellness Coaching (3)
Introduces theory, skills, and techniques related to guiding groups and individuals through meaningful lifestyle changes by emphasizing motivational strategies and behavioral and holistic practices. Participants will be introduced to lifestyle assessments, wellness and lifestyle change models, and basic interviewing and referral skills.

496 Seminar in Workplace Wellness (1-6)
Seminar topics will be identified, focusing on current issues in workplace wellness. Using the seminar format, will include research, discussion, and dissemination of information gathered in a given topic.    
    A total of 12 hours of credit may be earned. 

498 Senior Seminar in Workplace Wellness (1)
Participants discuss issues, content, and practices encountered during their involvement in the workplace wellness minor. 
    Open only to individuals who have completed all other requirements of the workplace wellness minor.     
    Prerequisite: WWIN 396, 397.

Academic Systems
North Quadrangle, Room 360
Ball State University
Muncie, IN 47306

Hours: Monday-Friday 7:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.