Most vaccines commercially available in the United States are available at the Health Center. A partial list of available vaccines follows. For more information about specific vaccines or diseases, please visit  www.cdc.gov/DiseasesConditions.

During the 2008-2009 academic year, students at Ball State University expressed concern about the potential side effects of thimerosal when used in vaccines in general and in influenza (flu) vaccines in particular. In response, the Health Center was able to find a source for flu vaccine free of thimerosal.

Gardasil:

Gardasil is a vaccination against Human Papillomavirus, the virus responsible for most abnormal Pap smears and most cases of cervical cancer.  It is a three-shot series given over a period of 6 months.  Click here for the Vaccine Information Sheet.

Hepatitis A:

Hepatitis A is a viral infection of the liver, usually contracted by eating fresh fruits or vegetables which have been contaminated. It is mainly a concern for travelers outside of the United States, but can certainly occur here as well.  It is a two-shot series given over a period of 6 months. Click here for the Vaccine Information Sheet.

Hepatitis B:

Hepatitis B is a viral infection that affects the liver. It can lead to serious illness, liver damage and even death. Most individuals infected with Hepatitis B are adolescents and young adults.

Hepatitis B is transmitted when infected semen, blood or body fluid enters the body of an uninfected person.  This usually occurs when a person has sex, shares a needle or syringe while using recreational drugs, or shares a razor or toothbrush with an infected person.

A vaccination is available and consists of a series of three shots given over a 6 month period. Many people born in the United States since the early 90s have already received the vaccine.

Click here for the Vaccine Information Sheet.

Influenza:

Influenza is a common illness.  Most college-age people who become ill with influenza recover uneventfully, but while they are ill they are often completely unable to attend classes, work, or study.  If a student becomes ill at a critical time during the semester such as just before final exams, it can be very disruptive.  Students with underlying problems such as asthma or heart disease are at greater risk of becoming seriously ill with influenza.  Influenza vaccine (flu) is offered to students each year in the fall.

Each year in the fall the Health Center makes flu vaccine available to students, through routine clinic visits as well as special scheduled clinics designed to make it as easy as possible for students to get the vaccine. Click here for the Vaccine Information Sheet.

Meningitis:

Meningococcal meningitis is a rare but potentially dangerous illness which can be caused by either viruses or bacteria.  It can lead to dangerous swelling of the fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord.

Viral meningitis is usually not as serious as the bacterial form, and viral meningitis is the more common of the two.  Persons typically recover with minimal treatment. Bacterial meningitis can cause serious illness with possible long-lasting effects on the nervous system, or even death within 48 hours.  If caught early, bacterial meningitis is often curable.

Exposure occurs through droplet contamination from the nose or throat of a person with meningococcal disease.  This is especially important information to students living in residence halls since exposure can occur more easily.  Exposure can also occur through intimate contact such as kissing, sharing beverage containers, cigarettes or eating utensils.

At first, symptoms may be typical of a cold or "flu", but there might then be a rapid progression to the following early warning symptoms:

  1. Severe Headache
  2. Fever
  3. Stiff Neck
  4. Extreme fatigue/lethargy
  5. Nausea and Vomiting
  6. Rash
  7. Sensitivity to light

Prevention of some types of bacterial meningitis is possible through vaccination. The protection is limited to specific strains of the bacteria. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has recommended that students receive information regarding meningococcal disease and the benefits of vaccination. Talk to your health practitioner regarding the pros and cons of this vaccination.

The Menactra vaccine provides protection for N. meningitidis serogroups A, C, Y and W-135.  This vaccine is available at the Health Center.  It is a one time vaccine if you are over 16 yrs of age.  If you received your meningitis vaccine before age 16, then you will need 1 booster shot after age 16.  Click here for the Vaccine Information Sheet.

The Trumenba vaccine provides protection for N. meningitidis serogroup B.  This strain of meningitis has caused outbreaks at universities in the United States since 2013.  It is a three-shot series and is available at the Health Center.  Click here for the Vaccine Information Sheet.

MMR:

MMR is a combination vaccine containing Measles, Mumps, and Rubella, or German Measles. It is a routine childhood vaccine in the United States and it is required for matriculation to Ball State.  Click here for the Vaccine Information Sheet in English.  Click here for the Vaccine Information Sheet in Arabic.  Click here for the Vaccine Information Sheet in Chinese.  If you need the Vaccine Information Sheet in a language not listed, please contact the Health Center.

Polio:

Polio vaccine is not routinely administered to adults in the US. It is advisable prior to travel to certain areas outside of the US.  This vaccine is no longer available through the Health Center.

Rabies:

Rabies vaccine is currently in short supply. It is currently recommended only in special circumstances following potential exposure to rabies, and for certain individuals at high risk of exposure.

This vaccine has to be ordered and paid for in advance.  Click here for the Vaccine Information Sheet.

Tetanus:

Currently the preferred vaccination is the Tdap which is a combination of tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis.  If you have an allergy to pertussis, you can receive the Td vaccine which is a combination containing tetanus and diphtheria only . It is a routine childhood vaccine that requires a booster shot every 10-years.  This vaccine is required for matriculation to Ball State. 

Click here for the Tdap Vaccine Information Sheet in English.  Click here for the Tdap Vaccine Information Sheet in Arabic.  Click here for the Tdap Vaccine Information Sheet in Chinese.  If you need the Vaccine Information Sheet in a language not listed, please contact the Health Center.

Typhoid fever:

Injectable and oral typhoid vaccines are available at the Health Center. The typhoid vaccine is advisable for travelers to certain locations outside of the United States. Oral vaccination is preferable for most travelers, but must be started at least 7 days before travel.  The oral vaccine needs to be repeated every 5 years and the injectable vaccine needs to be repeated every 2 years.

Click here for the Vaccine Information Sheet.