The Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) is the web-based system that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) uses to maintain information on F-visa and M-visa students in the United States and the SEVP-certified schools that enroll them. (SEVP stands for Student and Exchange Visitor Program.)

SEVIS also maintains information on U.S. Department of State-designated exchange visitor program sponsors and J-1 visa exchange visitor program participants.

SEVIS is a critical tool in our mission to protect national security while supporting the legal entry of the more than 1 million F, M, and J nonimmigrants to the United States for education and cultural exchange.

Learn more about SEVIS.

How SEVIS Is Used

For F and M Nonimmigrants

SEVIS is used to:

  • petition the Student and Exchange Visitor Program for certification that allows the school to offer programs of study to nonimmigrant students
  • update school information and apply for recertification of the school for continued ability to issue Certificates of Eligibility (Forms I–20) to nonimmigrant students and their dependents
  • issue Forms I–20 to specific individuals used by nonimmigrants to obtain F or M status while enrolled at the school
  • fulfill the school’s legal reporting responsibility regarding the student’s address, course of study, enrollment, employment, and compliance with the terms of the student status
  • transfer the student SEVIS record to another institution

For J Nonimmigrants

SEVIS is used to:

  • petition the Department of State for designation that allows the sponsor to offer educational and cultural exchange programs to exchange visitors
  • update sponsor information and apply for re-designation every two years
  • issue Forms DS–2019 to specific individuals to obtain J status
  • fulfill the sponsor’s legal reporting responsibility regarding the exchange visitors address, site of activity, program participation, employment, and compliance with the terms of the J status
  • transfer the exchange visitor’s SEVIS record to another institution