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Future Courses

1st Summer 2016 English courses are described below. For descriptions of all English courses, refer to the Graduate Catalog

  

1st Summer session 2016

 

ENG 614: Practicum in Literary Editing

Section 1: MWF 12:00-2:40 PM

Professor: Silas Hansen

This class is an introduction to the publishing industry with a focus on practical skills, including copyediting, content editing, design, marketing.  We will begin the class by discussing the history and the current state of the publishing industry (including mainstream book publishing, independent presses, and literary magazines).  We will attempt to answer questions like: What does “good writing” look like?  Who gets to decide what is (and isn’t) good writing?  How does an editor help a writer improve their work without taking away the ownership of it?   You will then spend the remainder of the class putting together a project of your choice—e.g., an anthology, a literary magazine, or even a chapbook of your own work—that will showcase the skills you’ve learned and will respond to your answers to those questions.

ENG 652: Studies in Poetry

Section 1: MWF 3:00-5:40 PM

Professor: Emily Rutter

This course will begin by examining the forms and tropes that distinguish poetry as a genre, and American poetry as a field of study. Moving across the twentieth century and into our own era, we will read poems as social texts that engage cultural phenomena, especially music, as well as political and theoretical discourses. For example, we will consider the ways in which Langston Hughes, Helene Johnson, Jean Toomer, and other Harlem Renaissance poets blurred the line between “high” and “low” art, as well as written and oral traditions with their adoption of blues and jazz tropes to the printed page. Moving into the post-WWII period, we will examine reciprocal exchanges between music and poetry in the work of Beat poets, such as Allen Ginsberg, and Black Arts Movement writers, such as Amiri Baraka and Sonia Sanchez. Entering into the post-Civil Rights era, we will explore the work of Marilyn Chin, Joy Harjo, Harryette Mullen, Tracy K. Smith, Terrance Hayes, and Sarah Blake, considering the ways in which these poets reflect shifting understandings of race and gender through their wide-ranging musical reference points, including hip hop, blues, and rock and roll. Throughout the course, our readings and discussions will be framed by critics specializing in cultural studies, race, gender, and sexuality. You will also play a crucial role in the ways that we examine and theorize poetry by actively engaging in class discussions, giving presentations, and producing a final conference-length essay. No prior knowledge of music and/or American poetry is required; all are welcome.

ENG 684: Topics in Second Language Acquisition 

Section 1: MTR 10:00AM-12:40PM

Professor: Megumi Hamada

This course covers the theoretical foundations of second language vocabulary, focusing on description (categorization of lexical items and definition of word knowledge), acquisition (factors and strategies/methods in learning new words), and use (collocation and context/topic specific use of words). Throughout the topics, the class will focus on the application of theories and research in pedagogy. In addition, students, as a team, will work on a research project that examines the influence of first language semantics and orthography on the acquisition of word-meaning on ESL learners. The overall objectives of the course are to gain a comprehensive knowledge of the current research and practices and to become able to carry out a research study in second language vocabulary.

ENG 690: Seminar in Composition

Section 1: MWF 9:00-11:40 AM

Professor: Mike Donnelly

This course will explore the tradition of critical rhetoric, a theoretical orientation with its roots in the Marxist and Critical Theory that emerged from the Frankfurt School in the mid-20th Century. A Critical Rhetoric seeks to unveil the ideological functions of discourse and manifestations of Power. We will attempt to critique 21st Century U.S. discourse as we engage some of the major texts from Adorno and Horkheimer, Althusser, Habermas, and Foucault, as well as the specifically rhetorical instantiation and the critique of critical theory represented by Raymie McKerrow, Barbara Biesecker, Judith Butler, and others.

Second Summer session 2016

Second Summer Session 

 

 

Fall 2016

ENG 520: Introduction to Linguistics
ENG 601: Research in English Studies
ENG 605: Teaching in English Studies
ENG 610: Reading and Writing Across the Genres
ENG 611: Workshop in Creative Nonfiction
ENG 612: Workshop in Fiction Writing
ENG 616: Introduction to Theories of Language Learning
ENG 617: Methods for Teaching English Language Learners
ENG 623: Phonetics and Phonology
ENG 629: Topics in Applied Linguistics
ENG 646: Studies in American Ethnic Literature
ENG 652: Studies in Poetry
ENG 661: Early British Studies
ENG 689: Writing Center Research and Administration
ENG 692: Writing Technologies


 

ENG 520: Introduction to Linguistics

Section 1: Monday and Wednesday 3:00-4:15 PM

 

Professor: Liz Riddle

This course will serve as a basis for further graduate work in linguistics and TESOL and will be more complex than an undergraduate introductory class.  It will introduce students to the nature of human language, its systematicity, its complexity, and its variety.  We will briefly survey major fields of linguistic study and consider some practical applications of linguistics to other fields and everyday life and social issues.  The course will challenge some popular conceptions about language and will foster the development of critical thinking, analytical, and research skills.



ENG 601: Research in English Studies

Section 1: Tuesdays 2:00-4:40 PM

 

Professor: Liz Riddle


Please contact the Professor for more information about the course.



ENG 605: Teaching in English Studies
Section 1: Wednesdays 6:30-9:10 PM

Professor: Pat Collier

This class will focus on the theory and practice of teaching literature to college students.  We will ask the basic historical and existential questions: Why teach literature? What benefits do college students gain from close and careful attention to literary works? Why does this seemingly non-instrumental practice exist in our seemingly instrumental society?  What are—or what might be—the politics of the literature classroom?  What exactly is this thing we all love called “Critical Thinking”?  Having come to your own conclusions on these questions, and articulated them in a Statement of Teaching Philosophy, you will work on establishing objectives and devising and executing methods for teaching literature. The semester will conclude with “micro-teaching” demonstrations in which you put into practice plans to teach several literary texts.



ENG 610: Reading and Writing Across the Genres
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 5:00-6:15 PM

Professor: Silas Hansen

 

This graduate creative writing class is designed specifically for MA students in English who are beginning the Creative Writing program at Ball State, but is open to all qualified graduate students interested in reading and writing in different genres. We will consider the possibilities inherent in the writing of fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, and screenplays and think both critically and creatively about the mechanical elements of craft and the possibilities for expression found in each genre.  We will read widely and write often (both in each genre and about each genre), share work in peer review and workshop, and hear from other writers’ about their writing processes through guest lectures.



ENG 611: Workshop in Creative Nonfiction

Section 1: Mondays 12:00-2:40 PM

 

Professor: Jill Christman (jcchristman@bsu.edu)


Inspired by the insightful, brick-by-brick essay about essays co-written by Ana Maria Spagna and Steve Harvey in the September 2015 issue of Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Studies, this graduate-level creative nonfiction workshop will focus on the art of transforming lived experience and the observable world into essays. Using our own lives and perceptive faculties as the lens through which we record the world, we’ll start by writing our memories—looking inward to reach outward—but we’ll also expand our scope to write about things beyond the self:  other people, other creatures, other places, and other ways of living in the world. We’ll work on the nuts and bolts of the writing (as well as the lumber and the sheets of tin and the panes of glass. . .), considering the essay in parts:  the beginning and the end, full-blown scenes and elliptical reflections, white space and titles, allusions and dialogue, and of course, the echoes, patterns, and the connections that lead us to new meaning. As we read the brand-new Best American Essays 2015, current issues of premier nonfiction journals (River Teeth: A Journal of Nonfiction Narrative and Brevity), and many, many individual essays, we’ll think about what it means to write something that matters, to write something that feels really true—and then we will practice.

Class time will be divided between discussions of published essays, regular writing exercises (generative techniques, constraints, revision, and maybe a field trip or two), and both small and large group workshops.  Course requirements will include regular writing exercises and critical responses, workshop critiques, a class presentation, one micro essay, two long essays, and a final portfolio.

“Writing an essay is like catching a wave,” writes Ariel Levy, the guest editor of Best American Essays 2015.  “To catch a wave, you need skill and nerve, not just moving water.”

 


ENG 612: Workshop in Fiction Writing

Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM

 

Professor: Sean Lovelace

Flash Fiction Throw-Down. The majority of this class will be READING quality works of flash fiction, DISCUSSION of craft, EXERCISES of flash fiction, and WORKSHOPPING FLASH FICTION, as in your own quality manuscripts (many). You will write a plethora of your own original flash fiction texts.  

 

The concept centrifuged here, a few quotes:

 

“Finding a good flash is like sighting a comet, all the more glorious for its being rare…” Shapard and Thomas.

 

“It is fiercely condensed, almost like a lyric poem.” Irving Howe.

 

“floating pictures…”  Kawabata

 

“How much can one remove and still have the composition be intelligible? This understanding, or its lack, divides those who can write from those who can really write. Chekhov removed the plot. Pinter, elaborating, removed the history, the narration; Beckett, the characterization. We hear it anyway. Omission is a form of creation.” David Mamet

 

“The line of beauty is the line of perfect economy.” Emerson.

 

WORKSHOP requirements: A section of the class will be dedicated to workshop, or peer review, of your own original flash fictions (knowing this, you shouldn’t submit any work that you aren’t comfortable sharing with the class). Every student is expected to thoroughly read their peers’ work, and to give thoughtful and respectful feedback. Although focusing on workshopping student stories at this time, we will continue with flash fiction concepts and our discussions of published fiction as well.

 

Texts: I cannot accurately suggest exactly what texts we will read this far in the future. I write, read, edit, review, judge, etc. flash fiction. We will have this class a comprehensive review of the very best flash fiction, from the genre’s long history to the most contemporary, the very best flash fiction, period.

 

Contact Professor Lovelace (salovelace@bsu.edu) with any questions. Please do contact me and ask. Flash Fiction is an exciting genre. I’d love to discuss.

 


ENG 616: Introduction to Theories of Language Learning

Section 1: Wednesdays 12:00-2:40 PM

 

Professor: Mary Lou Vercellotti

 

 



ENG 617: Methods for Teaching English Language Learners

Section 1: Mondays 12:00-2:40 PM

 

Professor: Megumi Hamada




ENG 623: Phonetics and Phonology

Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

 

Professor: Frank Trechsel

This course looks at the sounds of speech and the methods that linguists use to transcribe, classify, and analyze them.  The course looks at both the physical (articulatory and acoustic) and psychological (cognitive) properties of speech sounds.  The goal is to discover how speech sounds pattern within a language and how they are exploited by humans to convey meaning.

Textbook: Zsiga, Elizabeth. 2013. The Sounds of Language: An Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing. [ISBN: 978-1-4051-9103-6]



ENG 629: Topics in Applied Linguistics

Section 1: Mondays 6:30-9:10 PM

 

Professor: Liz Riddle

This course will take a linguistic approach to the analysis of digital forms of communication.  The focus will be on the the linguistic forms used in relation to the medium and purpose of communication, and on the pragmatics of interaction.  Among specific topics to be considered are the following:  comparison of linguistic structures and styles used in digital communication in relation to other forms of communication;  social attitudes to the forms of language used in digital communication;  electronic media as sources of linguistic data;  language choice in non-monolingual societies; issues of identity, anonymity, and (im)politeness.

Requirements will include readings, written homework assignments, some of which will involve data collection and/or analysis, a 12-15 page original research paper, and an oral presentation of the research paper.



ENG 646: Studies in American Ethnic Literature
Section 1: Mondays 6:30-9:10 PM

Professor: Emily Rutter

In this course, we will conceptualize Multi-Ethnic American literature in aesthetic, theoretical, and institutional terms. Using a comparative approach, we will examine the resonances and distinctions among various ethnic literary traditions, especially African American, Native American, Latino/a, and Asian American, from the 1960s through the contemporary era. The first half of the course will centralize the poetry and prose engendered by social consciousness and women’s movements, including the work of Amiri Baraka, Audre Lorde, Rodolfo Gonzales, Gloria Anzaldúa, Toni Morrison, Paula Gunn Allen, and Lawson Fusao Inada. In the second half of the course, we will consider how more contemporary writers, such as Junot Diaz, Monique Truong, Sherman Alexie, and Evie Shockley, to name a few, complicate notions of unified ethnic aesthetics or worldviews, reflecting the changing landscape of identity politics. Along the way, we will also examine the institutionalization of Multi-Ethnic American literature, including the establishment of ethnic studies programs and the so-called “canon wars” that erupted during the 1980s. Throughout the course, our readings and discussions will be framed by critics and theorists specializing in African American, Native American, Latino/a, and Asian American literature. You will also play a crucial role in the ways that we examine and theorize these fields, actively engaging in class discussions, giving presentations, and producing a final seminar paper. No prior knowledge about Multi-Ethnic American literature is required; all are welcome.



ENG 652: Studies in Poetry
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: Debbie Mix

Emily Dickinson and her Progeny - For decades, Emily Dickinson was presented as a poet isolated from her 19th-century culture and peers, and her work was read as somehow outside its time, in a kind of lyric bubble. Dickinson herself appears in these narratives as a kind of ghost, isolated and strange, and one might read Dickinson’s writing without thinking about her as a specific woman in a particular time and place.  In more recent decades, critics have sought to (re)historicize Dickinson, to understand her as a woman writer fully engaged in her world and her work as fully engaged with her culture.  While Dickinson and her work remain singular, we are also coming to understand her and her work as part of particular cultural, aesthetic, and historical contexts that inform both her work’s production and, over time, its reception. Our goal in this course will be to read Dickinson’s poetry and prose as a way to understand the construction and circulation of ideas about women, women writers (especially the “poetess”), and literary history. In particular, we’ll focus on four thematic areas in which gender plays a significant role both in how Americans in the second half of the 19th century were taught to understand themselves and in how Dickinson seems to have reacted to those mores: The Self and the Divine; The Body and the Erotic; The Self and the Other; and Publication and the Public.  In addition to reading deeply across Dickinson’s more than 1700 poems, we’ll also read from her letters, from the work of other scholars, and from the work of other poets and thinkers. In addition to a seminar paper, students will also write shorter essays and give presentations on criticism and cultural contexts.  



ENG 661: Early British Studies
Topic: Chaucer
Section 1: Tuesdays 6:30-9:10 PM

Professor: Vanessa Rapatz

In this graduate-level seminar we will examine the literature, culture, and language of the English Middle Ages through the works of the period’s most famous author Geoffrey Chaucer. Chaucer’s extensive writings comprise a variety of genres, styles, and traditions. Focusing on Chaucer’s literary canon will allow us to practice the linguistic skills required to read Middle English poetry and place it within the cultural context of late-medieval England. Additionally, we will survey medieval and modern traditions of Chaucerian criticism and scholarship. We will focus primarily on The Canterbury Tales and, after our initial introductions to Chaucer and his period, we will dedicate each week to one of Chaucer’s pilgrim storytellers, his/her tale, and the corresponding critics’ and readers’ responses.

Required Texts
Cannon, ed. The Riverside Chaucer
Horobin, Chaucer’s Language



ENG 689: Writing Center Research and Administration
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 3:30-4:45 PM

Professor: Jackie Grutsch McKinney

Though there’s some debate surrounding when the first writing center began, there’s abundant evidence that writing centers have become mainstream in colleges and universities in the US and increasingly prevalent in K-12 settings, communities, and in international universities. Writing centers take various forms and are known by various monikers, yet (mostly) have in common a type of education that comes without syllabi and teachers, without grades or assignments. Additionally, peer tutoring (student to student tutoring) is common and as such, a secondary benefit of writing centers is the education that tutors receive working in centers.

 

This course will explore the work of writing centers and focuses on these questions: What pedagogies are successful in writing center settings? What theories and theorists help us understand the teaching and learning that happens in writing centers? What do administrators of writing centers need to know about institutional politics, leadership, and management? How and why and where do writing center practitioners and scholars converge and diverge from writing studies in general?



ENG 692: Writing Technologies

Section 1: Wednesdays 12:00-2:40 PM

 

Professor: Rory Lee

 

Pencils, pens, paper, and computers:  all of them are technologies that are common to our culture and that we use frequently to write texts of various types.  However, when we cite these writing technologies, we simultaneously elide other historically important writing technologies, such as cuneiform, clay tablets, papyrus, parchment, typewriters, and word processors.  What these examples of writing technologies indicate is that the tools we use to write inevitably change:  some progress and persist, while others are replaced and effaced.  All of these writing technologies are nonetheless connected to and inform one another in multiple ways, and as such, it would behoove us to tease out the relationships between and among writing technologies historically.  Doing so allows us to understand better not only how and why writing technologies emerge and evolve but also what those evolutions mean for who is able to write, why, how, and to whom.

 

This course affords us the opportunity to explore the development and implications of writing technologies historically and contemporarily.  However, in focusing on the technologies that allow us to write, we must not forget what Walter Ong and others continue to remind us:  that is, that writing itself is a technology, one that restructures thought.  In that sense, writing and the technologies we use to write are not innately human; in fact, they call into question what it means to be (post)human.  Thus, throughout this course, we’ll take this question into serious consideration as we work to discuss, theorize, and utilize various writing technologies.  In addition, we’ll pay particular attention to the ramifications of the digital, including the way digital writing technologies both extend and complicate the writerly practices and traditions common to the West.  



 

 

Department of English
Robert Bell Building (RB), Room 297
Ball State University
Muncie, IN 47306

Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Phone: 765-285-8580
Fax: 765-285-3765
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