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Current Courses

Current English courses are described below and future course descriptions are available as schedules are finalized. For descriptions of all English courses,refer to the Undergraduate Catalog.

Spring 2014 Course Descriptions

ENG 204: Literature for Children
ENG 213: Introduction to Digital Literacies
ENG 220: Language and Society
ENG 230: Reading and Writing About Literature
ENG 231: Professional Writing
ENG 240: American Literature 1: The Beginnings to 1860 
ENG 260: British Literature 1: The Beginnings to 1780
ENG 306: Creative Nonfiction Writing – Introduction to Creative Nonfiction
ENG 307: Fiction Writing
ENG 310: Screenwriting
ENG 320: Introduction to Linguistic Science
ENG 321: English Linguistics 
ENG 346: Studies in Nineteenth-Century American Literature - Romance and Reform
ENG 350: Teaching Writing in Secondary Schools
ENG 363: Renaissance & Seventeenth-Century British Literature
ENG 402: Cultural Studies
ENG 405:  Special Topics in Creative Writing - The New York School Forward
ENG 405: Special Topics in Creative Writing - Literary Citizenship
ENG 406: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing
ENG 407: Advanced Fiction Writing 
ENG 408: Advanced Poetry Writing
ENG 409: Creative Writing in the Community 
ENG 410: Advanced Screenwriting
ENG 414: Young Adult Literature
ENG 421: Studies in Literary History
ENG 425: Film Studies
ENG 431: Rhetoric, Writing, and Emerging Media
ENG 435: Issues in Rhetoric and Writing - Visual Communication and Document Design
ENG 444: Senior Seminar – Americans Abroad
ENG 444: Senior Seminar – Hideous Progeny: The Children of the Gothic
ENG 444: Senior Seminar – Magazines: Crucibles of Literature
ENG 457:  Practicum in Teaching TESOL - Curriculum Development and Assessment
ENG 489: Practicum in Literary Editing and Publishing
ENG 490: Women in Literature
ENG 492: Native American Literatures


Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday  9:00-9:50 am 
Section 2: Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:00-10:50 am 

Professor: Lyn Jones 

An overview of children's literature and an intensive study of the various genres for grades K to 6. Designed for elementary education programs. Cannot be counted as an elective in English. Prerequisite: EDEL 100 or equivalent. 

ENG 213: Introduction to Digital Literacies 

Section 3: Monday, Wednesday, Friday  1:00-1:50 pm 

Professor: Elmar Hashimov 

Introduction to Digital Literacies is about people acting with technology; “technologies are both designed and used in the context of people and desires” (Kaptelinin and Nardi, 2006, p. 10). This course is focused entirely on digital literacies, on people acting with technology via their discursive activities, now and in the near future. At the end of this course you will be able to identify and explain some of the key rhetorical, social,cultural, ethical, and economic issues related to people acting with technology. 

ENG 213 will introduce you to 4 crucial digital literacies: interacting + analyzing + researching + producing.

Our exploration of these literacies will be grounded in theories of rhetoric, writing, and technical and professional communication. We will examine the role that language plays in our lives, organizations, and digital spaces—from our ways of acquiring and expressing knowledge to the ways that we perceive the world, ourselves, and others. The culmination of the course will be reflected in four distinct yet integrated deliverables: public writing + code folder + web-based research project + assessment memo. 

Section 2: Monday, Wednesday, Friday  12:00-12:50 pm 

Professor: Mai Kuha 

You speak the way you do because of who you are and where you are from. You also adjust the way you speak according to the situation. In this course, we will discuss the nature of this language variation and how its interaction with social attitudes affects our lives. Our look at the nature of language variation will include the main features of dialects of English in the U.S. (regional dialects and African American English) a brief look at how language and gender connect how language change results in language variation the main facts about the presence of minority languages in the U.S. 

When looking at the impact of the interaction between language variation and social attitudes, we will consider
how people are judged because of the way they speak,
how this affects linguistic minorities in the educational system, and
how language attitudes find their way into legislation.   

Section 3:  Tuesday, Thursday  2:00-3:15 PM 

Professor: Miranda Nesler 

“Alienating the Commonplace”
By encouraging discourse with fellow scholars and introducing you to a range of genres and critical approaches, this course aims to help you develop the critical thinking and writing skills necessary for the study of literature.  Keeping this goal in mind, we will frame our discussion with a selection of literary texts that urge us to consider how writers deploy language, structure, and genre to align with and/or undermine readers’ expectations and bring new dimension to daily events.  These texts will serve as a locus for our discussion as we move toward an understanding of what it means for each of us to be both critical readers and writers. 

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Section 2: Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:00-10:50 am 
Section 3: Monday, Wednesday  5:00-6:15 pm 

Professor: Eva Snider 

In this course, we will explore professional writing: what it means to write for and with others, to design and create content for complex work environments, and to collaborate on primary research in a professional context. We will begin by discussing the professional in professional writing, including concepts of professionalism and professionalism in the production of documents. Along the way, you will also learn about common genres of professional writing, including proposals, memos, e-mail, bibliographies, and reports. 

The main line of the course, though, will be a primary professional research project on users of a discursive technology. Near the beginning of the semester, you and your research team (of approximately 3-5 members) will write a proposal for a research project that incorporates surveys, interviews, and artifact  analysis to begin to explore how everyday users of a particular discursive technology interact with that technology. From there, you will learn the theories and practices of conducting primary research in a professional context, including survey building, interviewing, and artifact analysis/coding. You will ultimately produce a white paper, which presents your research findings and suggests directions for future research, a fact sheet, which distills your findings into an easily accessed form, and a presentation to the rest of the class. 

This course will immerse you in various concepts central to the field of professional writing, including qualitative field research, project management, visual rhetoric and document design, and professionalism.You will be expected to produce high quality deliverables grounded in real-world situations 

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday  9:00-9:50 am 

Professor: Robert Habich   

The purpose of this course is to expose English majors and minors to the diversity of works, writers, and movements in American literature up to the Civil War.  Though I realize that you will be reading some of these authors for the first time, the class is not designed as an introduction to literary analysis.  I expect you to read all of the material carefully, thoughtfully, and with an open mind. By the end of the semester we will all know the works better--and, I hope, we will have had some fun understanding the best that early American writers produced.  There will be a midterm, a final exam, a critical research report, and frequent quizzes. 

Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday  9:30-10:45 am 

Professor: Miranda Nesler 

“Narrative and Power”
This course will introduce you to major British writers and texts before 1700.  In examining canonical works by authors such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Wroth, and Milton, we will narrow our focus by considering the role of narrative in early literature:
What constitutes narrative and its role in literature across time?
Who or what controls narratives—whether they are individual, familial, political, or gendered?
In what way does narrative bestow power or authority? How might it disempower?
To what degree did writers share anxieties or concerns about the creation and use of narratives?  How did such concerns shift over time?
How might we, as active writers and readers of social narrative, attempt to create our own narratives? 

Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday  11:00-12:15 pm 
Section 2: Tuesday, Thursday  9:30-10:45 am 

Professor: Todd McKinney 

What is Creative Nonfiction (CNF)? Are there different types of CNF? How is CNF different than journalism?What is a fact? Any different than truth? What is truth? A matter of perspective? And what is Perspective anyway? Is that the same as a narrator? How is a CNF narrator different than a fiction narrator? Or a poet?Who tells the truth? How does one put the truth into words that are both artful and honest? 

These are just a few of the questions we will take up this semester in this introduction to the literary genre of CNF, which will provide the student with the opportunity to practice writing CNF and to further explore its possibilities by reading and discussing a number of essays. In short, this class asks the student to write and read a lot. Furthermore, the class will introduce the student to the sub genres of CNF and to the key concepts and terms needed to be a part of the conversation that is CNF. The assignments and exercises will challenge students to think critically and creatively to better understand how we make meaning out of language and experience so we can present it to a reader to continue the discussion of what it means to be alive on earth.

Course assignments will include drafts, workshop responses, quizzes and reading responses, and a portfolio.

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Section 1: Monday, Wednesday,  Friday  10:00-10:50 am 
Section 2: Monday, Wednesday,  Friday  2:00-2:50 pm   

Professor: Craig O’Hara 

This course centers on the fundamentals of writing the literary short story—vivid concrete language, three-dimensional characters, complex plot—with an emphasis on the student’s ability to write clearly and dramatically. The focus of this course will be the writing workshop and the extensive revision that all writers employ to develop their work into polished pieces. The course also includes discussion of, and hands-on practice with, elements of the craft and in-depth class discussions of the techniques employed by authors recognized in the field. 

In addition to the writing workshop, assignments include short developmental pieces and critical reading responses to contemporary works of fiction. At the end of the semester students will turn in a portfolio of revised stories and a submission of work to a literary magazine. 

Texts will include: Janet Burroway’s Writing Fiction, including contemporary works of short fiction by writerssuch as Junot Diaz, Maura Stanton, and Sherman Alexie. 

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday  5:00-6:15 pm 
Section 3: Monday, Wednesday, Friday  11:00-11:50 am 
Section 4: Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:00-10:50 am 

Professor: John King   

PREREQUISITE: ENG 285: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING. Students who have not taken thisprerequisite are ineligible to take English 310 and will be asked to drop the course.   

English 310 is an introductory course in the theory and practice of screenwriting. For this course, studentswill write four short, complete screenplays of roughly 5 pages each. In addition, they will completeprewriting exercises, view films, and read material related to the craft of screenwriting.  Much of this coursewill focus on workshops and critiques of student screenplays, as well as the reading and analysis ofscreenplays and screenplay excerpts.  This includes matters of format, content, structure, style, drafting, andrevision, among other things.  English 310 is designed to give students an understanding of what goodscreenwriting technique and cinematic storytelling are all about while also giving students the opportunity toapply their understanding to writing original, short screenplays. Student work will involve the following:  Understanding and manipulating essential techniques of cinematic storytelling. Understanding and utilizingmajor structural elements of screenwriting form. Developing original story ideas into coherent scenes andcomplete screenplays. Receiving and incorporating feedback about structure, content, format, and style fromtheir professor and peers. Reading, evaluating, and offering constructive criticism on classmates’ writing.Reading material related to the craft of screenplay writing and screenplays written by establishedscreenwriters. Analyzing (i.e., “reading”) films to better understand the craft of screenplay writing. 

ENG 310: Screenwriting 

Section 2: Tuesday, Thursday  12:30-1:45 pm 

Professor: Matt Mullins   

PREREQUISITE: ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing   

English 310 is an introductory course in the theory and practice of screenwriting. For this course students will write one short, complete screenplay of roughly 10 to 20 pages. In addition, they will complete a number of screenplay writing exercises, view films, and read material related to the craft of screenplay writing.  Much of this course will focus on the work shopping and collective critique of student screenplays and the reading and analysis of screenplays and screenplay excerpts considered from the perspective of craft.  Our focus will be on the discussion, analysis, and practice of the techniques and processes of screenwriting.  This includes matters of format, content, structure, style, drafting, and revision, among other things.  In sum, this course is intended to introduce students to the concepts of good screenwriting technique and cinematic storytelling while also giving them the opportunity to apply that understanding to their own short screenplays.  To this end, student work will involve the following:   

Understanding and applying the essential techniques of screenplay format.
Understanding and manipulating the essential techniques of cinematic storytelling.      
Understanding and utilizing the major structural elements of the screenwriting form.
Developing original story ideas into coherent scenes and/or complete screenplays.
Receiving and incorporating into their work feedback about structure, content, format and style from their professor and peers.
Reading, evaluating, and offering constructive criticism on the work of their classmates.
Reading material related to the craft of screenplay writing and screenplays written by established screenwriters.
Analyzing (i.e., “reading”) films to better understand the craft of screenplay writing. 

Section 1:  Tuesday, Thursday  9:30-10:45 am 

Professor: Lynne Stallings 

The aim of this linguistics course is to raise your awareness of the complex organization and systematic nature of language, the primary means of human communication.  In a sense, you will be studying your self since you are a prime example of a language user.  Most of your knowledge of language, however, is unconscious, and the part of language that you can describe is largely the result of your earlier education,which may have provided you with confusing or misleading notions about language.  This course is intended to clarify your ideas about language and bring you to a better understanding of its nature by introducing you to the basic principles of linguistic science and the major areas of the field, including, but not limited to,phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, sociolinguistics and psycholinguistics. This is not a course about just one particular language, but about human language in all its aspects.  Some of the data to be analyzed will come from languages with which students are familiar, but students will also work with data from languages with which they have no prior familiarity. 

Section 1:  Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10-10:50 am  
Section 2: Tuesday, Thursday 2:00-3:15 pm 

Professor: Mai Kuha 

The goal of this course is to give students an informed perspective on sentence structure in English, leadingto an understanding of basic sentence structure and terminology. 

We will start with lexical categories and then move on to phrase types, clause types, and ways of rearranging and embedding these structures. In each topic, basic practice will be followed by discussion of questions that connect the analysis of sentence structure to larger issues, which might include language acquisition,language variation, and misunderstanding in various kinds of communication. Pedagogical implications are addressed primarily through alternate versions of assignments designed for teaching majors. Although some learning objectives will be specific to particular students’ interests and future career paths, the general goals are to enable all students to… 

read a writer’s handbook or other reference materials with ease, having become familiar with grammatical terminology and concepts
evaluate the quality of advice that these authorities provide about sentence structure
confidently figure out unfamiliar structures by looking for patterns and forming hypotheses
decide which analysis fits a sentence best, and articulate why
use a variety of structures in their writing even more effectively and deliberately
take ownership of their language!     

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ENG 346: Studies in Nineteenth-Century American Literature - Romance and Reform 

Section 1:  Monday, Wednesday, Friday  12:00-12:50 pm 

Professor: Robert Habich 

Romantic writers of the mid-nineteenth century are too easily seen as aloof artists disengaged from the great social issues of their day. But not in this class. Together we will read a selection of fiction and creative non-fiction that explores the connections between Romanticism and social issues, focusing on some key questions in the American reformist agenda:  industrialization and technology, the “woman question,” slavery and race,and war and peace. 

Part biography, part literary history, part archival detective work, and part interpretation, this course will include some texts  you have likely heard of (selections from Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl [1861], Henry David Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience” [1848] and Walden [1854], Margaret Fuller’s “The Great Lawsuit” [1843], and others) and some that may be unfamiliar to you, such as Maria Susanna Cummins’ The Lamplighter (1854), Frank Webb’s The Garies and Their Friends (1857), Elizabeth Stuart Phelps’s The Silent Partner (1871), and John William De Forest’s Miss Ravenel's Conversion from Secession to Loyalty (1867).  

In addition to four full-length narratives, the syllabus includes a generous selection of essays, chapters, and short stories, all on-line. Grades will be based upon class participation and quizzes, an oral report on nineteenth-century topics and artifacts, a midterm exam, a final exam, and a short analytical essay.     

Section 1:  Tuesday, Thursday  2:00-3:15 pm 

Professor: Susanna Benko 

This course explores various strategies and issues concerned in teaching of writing in secondary schools.  We focus on important aspects of writing instruction including (but not limited to) task/assessment design, lesson planning, grammar instruction, and formative/summative feedback on student work.  We also addres show technology and 21st century literacies can be leveraged both in instruction and in student writing more broadly. 

Prerequisite:  Open only to English/Language Arts Teaching Majors.  Must have passed DP2. 

Section 1:  Tuesday, Thursday 3:30-4:45 pm 

Professor: Miranda Nesler 

“Hybrids, Humans, and Others in the Renaissance”
What is invested in the distinction between “human” and “animal”?  How do the definitions of these terms affect individual and social identities or legal and social behaviors?  This course will take up such questions,encouraging students to consider how early modern literary texts represent and engage in the debates and definitions regarding human and animal nature.  By bringing a range of philosophical, social, and legal documents into conversation with contemporary drama and poetry, this course will further urge students to explore how early modern vocabularies about humanity shape similar concerns in our own lives. 

ENG 402: Cultural Studies 

Section 2: Tuesday, Thursday 12:30-1:45 pm 

Professor: Frank Felsenstein 

"REMEMBERING THE HOLOCAUST" 

‘Not the power to remember, but its very opposite, the power to forget, is a necessary condition for ourexistence’ (Sholem Asch, The Nazarene, 1939) 

‘If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning’ (Psalms, 137.5) 

Almost three quarters of a century after the start of World War 2, should the Holocaust still hold muchmeaning for those living at the advent of a new Millennium? When those that witnessed it are no more, willthere still be an obligation to preserve and make iconic the memory of such a flagrant “crime againsthumanity”? What, if anything, should we remember? What should be learned? Is it not best to forget -- andforgive? If so, why has the State of Indiana (along with some other states) now mandated the teaching of theHolocaust in its public schools? Can we make any sense of our fascinated fear of the unspeakable?The seminar will interrogate the impulse to promote the Holocaust as for many the single most definingcatastrophe of the twentieth century. It will investigate the disparity between the comparative silence in theyears immediately after World War 2 and the cultural spotlighting in recent times of the atrocities andsufferings of the Nazi era (called by some the "Americanization of the Holocaust"). It will also explore thequestion of "authenticating" the trauma of the Holocaust, and why there are many individuals who describethemselves as second or third generation survivors. We shall consider the continuing influence of theHolocaust and of acts of genocide on religious belief (where was God?), on education (have we learned anylessons? how do we explain to the next generation?), on Jewish and Christian relations, and more broadly,on the cultural imagination. Particular aspects that will be given prominence are the documentation of theHolocaust by witnesses through letters, diaries, and memoirs, and its literary and cinematic representations.We are planning to have at least one immediate witness meet with the class. Although this does not purportto be a sequential study of the history of the Nazi era, students will be encouraged to keep a course journalin which they should chart the progression of their thinking about the Holocaust and its significance.  Pleasefeel free to contact me at felsenstein@bsu.edu with any questions. 

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ENG 405:  Special Topics in Creative Writing - The New York School Forward 

Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 11:00-12:15 pm 

Professor: Peter Davis 

English 405 is an advanced poetry writing class that is grounded on a firm understanding of the New York School of poetry. After becoming familiar with the founders, students will read much contemporary poetry that has followed as a result of these influential writers. We will be discussing all of this poetry in great detail,as well as writing poems inspired by our readings and sharing them in a workshop setting.  Students will do lots of reading and lots of writing in an effort to become better readers, writers and thinkers. 

ENG 405: Special Topics in Creative Writing - Literary Citizenship 

Section 2: Thursdays 6:30-9:10 pm 

Professor: Cathy Day 

A literary citizen is an aspiring writer who understands that you have to contribute to, not just expect things from, the publishing world. This course will teach you how to take advantage of the opportunities offered by your campus, local, regional and national literary communities and how you can best contribute to those communities given your talents and interests. It will also help you begin to professionalize yourself as a writer. You will learn how to 1.) create your own professional blog or website, 2.) use social media to build your writing community, 3.) interview writers and publish those interviews, 4.) review books and publish those reviews, 5.) navigate the editorial process of literary magazines and book publishers 6.) deliver an effective public presentation or reading of your work. Students will make use of the Ball State Career Center and create a professional resume and cover letter for job applications. Students who complete the course in an exemplary fashion will be eligible to apply for unpaid internship positions as Social Media Tutors at the Midwest Writers Workshop in Muncie July 24-26, 2014. If you’d like to learn more about what literary citizenship is, go to: www.literarycitizenship.com. 

Section 1:  Monday, Wednesday, Friday  1:00-1:50 pm 

Professor: Todd McKinney   

This is a creative nonfiction workshop that will focus on the creation of nonfiction that tells stories of the self, of others, of places, of things, all the while incorporating research and documentation in very compelling ways. Of course, in order to write well, we must read, and so we will split our time between workshops of student work and in-depth discussion of published texts. The readings will offer a wide range of approaches with which to write about lived experience as well as people, places, things. As for our own writing, we will draft essays that mix storytelling and research. Other requirements will include: critical reading responses, quizzes, and workshop critiques. Class time will be divided between discussions of published works, student writing experiments and exercises, and workshops of your own writing. 

Section 1:  Wednesday, Friday  3:00-4:15 pm 

Professor: Cathy Day 

The focus of this course is novel writing, specifically: 1.) intense focus on the writing process and on developing a writing regimen; 2.) writing assignments which will help you gather material, develop your plot, and get to know your characters; 3.) ten weekly word count check ins; 4.) practice creating an outline or storyboard of your book; 5.) small peer groups for feedback (there will be no all-group workshop), and 6.) analysis of a few novels that will serve as models. Understand though: you will not “write a novel” this semester, you will start one—from scratch or by expanding a short story or an idea you are less than 50 pages into. If you have already written an entire draft of a novel and merely want to tweak it, this class is not for you. By the end of the semester, all students will be required to produce at least 20,000 original words (approx. 80 pgs) of new work, which means you’ll produce 2,000 words (about 7-8 pages) a week. At this stage in the writing process we will not be overly concerned with the quality of your writing, but rather with the quantity. Of the 20,000 words you produce, 20-30 pages will be revised and discussed by your small group. At the end of the semester, we’ll learn how one submits a novel to editors and agents, and you’ll submit a query letter and 10-page partial of your novel. 

Possible Texts:
Salvatore Pane, Last Call in the City of Bridges
Tom Perrotta, Election
Evan S. Connell, Mrs. Bridge 

ENG 407: Advanced Fiction Writing 

Section 2: Tuesday, Thursday  12:30-1:45 pm 

Professor: Sean Lovelace 

In this class we will continue many of the concepts of English 307, with an expectation of advanced complexity. The class will focus on student and professional manuscripts in the genre of FLASH FICTION (complete stories—with interest in structure, language, and theme—with a word count under 750 words). We will discuss the spectrum of lyricism versus narrative, and all points in-between. We will read a wide variety of flash fiction texts and critical essays on the genre by professional authors. We will create many of our own flash fiction drafts, in a wide variety of schools, from realism to surrealism. And we will workshop those drafts, focusing on constructive feedback and considered revision. 

Texts:
Oh Baby by Kim Chinquee
Trout Fishing in America by Richard Brautigan
Monogamy Songs by Gregory Sherl
Paris Spleen by Charles Baudelaire
T Fleischmann’s Syzygy, Beauty
Flash Fiction 72 Very Short Stories by Thomas, Thomas, Hazuka
We will also have handouts and online texts. 

Contact Professor Lovelace (salovelace@bsu.edu) with any questions. 

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ENG 408: Advanced Poetry Writing  

Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday  2:00-3:15 pm 

Professor: Mark Neely

This is an upper-level course in poetry writing. About half the class will be devoted to discussion of readings, including several collections by contemporary poets. We will talk about how the authors attempt to unify these collections, and look closely at the dazzling number of formal choices poets make in their work. The readings will help inspire the poems written for the class, inform the way we discuss your poems, and offer strategies for revision. Written assignments include poems, book reviews, and a portfolio of poems at the end of the semester.

Readings will include essays on poetics and the following books:

The Best American Poetry 2013, Denise Duhamel and David Lehman, eds.; No Object by Natalie Shapero; King Me by Roger Reeves; When My Brother Was an Aztec by Natalie Diaz; The Light the Dead See by Frank Stanford

ENG 409: Creative Writing in the Community 

Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 5:00-6:15 pm 

Professor: Sean Lovelace 

“An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow confines of his individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity.” Martin Luther King 

“Two groups of warm, living, breathing human beings…KIDS and TEACHERS. These are the real ROOTS of writing.” Marjorie Frank. 

Creative Writing in the Community is an immersive, service-learning project. Students will work with participating social services agencies (Storer Elementary and Motivate Our Minds, for example) to create original imaginative texts. Our objectives include the enrichment of the creative writing experience, through study of the art form and through engagement in the local community; through the scholarly study of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction; through relevant essays about creative writing pedagogy and community engagement; and through the use of critical and creative examinations of the student’s own and collaborative work created for the class. The end product will be a public community reading and published anthology. This immersive experience offers the opportunity for the students to learn about themselves through others and to become more productive citizens of the local and academic communities. 

ENG 410: Advanced Screenwriting 

Section 2: Tuesday, Thursday  5:00-6:15 pm 
Section 3: Monday  6:30-9:10 pm 

Professor: Matt Mullins 

English 410 is an advanced workshop in the theory and practice of screenwriting.  As such, students in this course will write and workshop (i.e., have collectively critiqued) two complete, short screenplays of approximately 10-15 pages each. In addition, they will be asked to complete various screenwriting and script development exercises, view films, and read material related to the craft of screenplay writing.  The bulk of this course will focus on the workshopping and collective critique of student screenplays and the reading and analysis of screenplays and screenplay excerpts considered from the perspective of craft.  Our focus will be on a higher level of discussion related to the practice and analysis of the techniques and processes of screenwriting.  This includes matters of genre, content, structure, style, drafting, and revision, among other things.  One of the major goals of this course (especially Fall Semester sections) is to provide short scripts for production in Ball State’s Cinema Entertainment Immersion program (the CEI).  Therefore, much emphasis will be given to the development of short screenplays suitable for production here at BSU.  This course is intended to build upon the understanding of concepts developed in English 310 while also giving students the opportunity to further apply that understanding to their own screenplays.  To this end, student work will involve the following: 

Utilizing the essential techniques of cinematic/visual storytelling
Utilizing the major structural elements of screenwriting form
Developing original story ideas into scenes and/or complete screenplays
Incorporating into their work feedback about format, structure, content, and style from their professor and peers, and revising accordingly
Reading, evaluating, and offering constructive criticism (both verbal and written) on the work of their classmates
Reading material related to the craft of screenplay writing and/or screenplays written by established screenwriters
“Reading” (i.e., analyzing) films to better understand the craft of screenplay writing
Developing scripts for potential production via Ball State’s CEI program 

ENG 414: Young Adult Literature 

Section 1: Tuesday  6:30-9:10 pm 

Professor: Susanna Benko 

This course will focus on recent young adult literature, representing multiple genres, suitable for young adults.  We will study young adult literature via reading and discussing multiple novels within the genre, as well as reading and discussing multiple supplemental texts (articles and chapters) highlighting historical aspects of the genre and topics within young adult literature related to the novels we read.  

The emphasis is primarily on the reading and analysis of literature, with some attention given to methodology. Questions that guide our work include:  What is the historical development of the genre of young adult literature, and why is it valuable today?  In what ways do various parties (e.g., scholars, authors, publishers) define “young adult”?  What is included in this genre? What are current debates about the genre and its inclusion in secondary language arts classrooms? 

How can young adult literature be leveraged towards engaging students (and adults) in critical discussions of issues that matter?  

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ENG 421: Studies in Literary History 

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday  2:00-2:50 pm 

Professor: Robert Habich 

English 421 will introduce you to four interrelated issues in the construction of literary history in English: the use and misuse of literary biography, periodization, textual editing, and the economics of book production. It may be useful to think of each issue in terms of a question to be addressed: literary biography: how are authors' lives written, and what if anything can they tell us about texts? periodization: how useful is it to talk in terms of literary "isms"--Romanticism, Realism, and so forth? textual editing: how do manuscripts, letters, diaries, and other unpublished texts become "literature"? and book history and book production: how do commercial considerations like marketing, readership, production, and distribution influence the formation of the canon? 

Students are expected to complete all assigned readings on time, participate in class discussion, and attend class regularly. In addition, for two of the four issues you will choose a specific topic to investigate and present the results of your investigation in class. Your final paper will be an expansion of one of these earlier assignments, more fully researched and with more complicated questions and answers. The final exam will be an optional essay for those who wish to replace a grade on one of the short assignments. 

ENG 425: Film Studies 

Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday  9:30-10:45 am 
Section 2: Tuesday, Thursday  2:00-3:15 pm 
Lab (for both sections): Tuesday  4:00-6:00 pm 

Professor: Amit Baishya 

This course is an introduction to film analysis. We will cover issues such as film form, techniques, styles and genre. The goal of this course is to equip you with the basic analytical tools that are required for a sustained critical engagement with cinema. 

ENG 431: Rhetoric, Writing, and Emerging Media 

Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday  9:30-10:45 am 

Professor: Eva Snider 

In this course, we will explore writing with regards to perhaps the most important “emerging media” out there: the web. We will discuss what web writing looks like, how it differs from other types of writing, and what that means for professional writers today. You will complete several web writing projects, culminating in a significant web writing project: a professional online portfolio that you can use in your future life as a professional writer. Concepts covered in this course include web writing, social media, content management and strategy, web usability, HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. 

ENG 435: Issues in Rhetoric and Writing - Visual Communication and Document Design 

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday  9:00-9:50 am 

Professor: Eva Snider 

In this course, we will explore visual communication, or how we as human beings use visual language to communicate, to persuade, to inform. We will begin by discussing theories of visual communication, including visual perception and thinking, visual culture, and visual rhetoric. We will then move into instruction in the production technologies necessary for document designers, as well as the process designers and professional writers often follow to design documents. From there, we will examine general principles of document design, including how to examine documents critically through the lens of those principles. Finally, we will focus on more specific principles of visual communication, including principles of color, space, and typography. 

This class is well suited for all students interested in becoming better visual communicators and document designers. It draws on principles common in art, graphic and information design, and professional writing.

While you will be completing readings and analysis assignments, this course is a production course, meaning the primary focus will be on the documents you design. You will be doing a significant amount of work sketching, wireframing, prototyping, providing feedback, and revising visual documents.

ENG 444: Senior Seminar – Americans Abroad 

Section 1:  Monday, Wednesday  5:00-6:15 pm 

Professor: Maria Windell 

Authors in the United States often send their characters abroad. Thinking of “Americans abroad” usually brings to mind literary voyages to Europe, often to England, Italy, and Spain… Yet U.S. writers also send characters gallivanting through the Americas and Asia. Looking at Americans—aka U.S. citizens—who have been written into Europe, Asia, and the Americas—this course will examine how national, racial, class, ethnic, cultural, political, and gendered identities have been shaped by individual U.S. citizens’ transnational encounters. We will consider such questions as, in what ways do characters process contact with unfamiliar cultures? What are characters’ reasons for traveling, and what are the differences between travelers in search of adventure, or education, or culture, or fortune, or escape, or power, or so on? 

ENG 444: Senior Seminar – Hideous Progeny: The Children of the Gothic

Section 2: Tuesday, Thursday  12:30-1:45 pm 

Professor: Joyce Huff 

Subterranean dungeons, secret passageways, flickering lamps, screams, moans, bloody hands, ghosts, and graveyards: these, according to the editors of The Norton Anthology of English Literature, are some of the standard motifs of the Gothic. Although the Gothic form arose in eighteenth-century Britain, its influence was felt long after the first wave of Gothic fiction ended in the 1830’s. Echoes of the Gothic have continually resurfaced in British and American fiction and can still be seen in the horror movies and Stephen King novels that we enjoy today. In this course, we will explore the uses to which Gothic motifs and themes were put in the nineteenth century, and we will chill our blood by reading a selection of Gothic-inspired novels of the period. 

Although we may begin with a classic 18th-century example and end by looking at a current manifestation of the genre, we will focus primarily on nineteenth-century novels and short stories. Possible works for study include: Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Wilkie Collins’s The Woman in White, and short stories by Poe, Lovecraft, Hawthorne, Kipling, Stevenson, Hardy, Gaskell, Braddon, Nesbit, Freeman and others. There will also be critical readings on the Gothic, focusing on theorists who tackle the question of why we find certain motifs frightening. Course requirements will include a short paper, a substantial research project, reading quizzes, presentations and participation in discussion, both in class and on-line. 

ENG 444: Senior Seminar – Magazines: Crucibles of Literature 

Section 3:  Tuesday, Thursday  9:30-10:45 am 

Professor: Pat Collier 

Much of the most-studied and best-loved literature in college curricula first saw the light of day in magazines and other periodicals.  Periodicals provided essential income and exposure for writers from Jonathan Swift to Henry James to Alice Munro.  They have also for three centuries provided the primary venue for book reviews and debates about literary quality, and about what is and is not "literature."  Today's fiction writers and poets still publish primarily in magazines, from artsy "little magazines" to upstart on-line "zines" to prestigious commercial outlets like The New Yorker.  Yet we rarely talk about magazines themselves, though they are complex and fascinating cultural artifacts in their own right.  Once a writer's work lasts for more than a generation and makes it into anthologies, the role of magazines in his or her career, as supporters, purveyors, and contexts of the work, tend to fade almost entirely from view. 

ENG 457:  Practicum in Teaching TESOL - Curriculum Development and Assessment 

Section 1: Wednesday  3:00-5:40  pm 

Professor: Lynne Stallings 

The aim of this course is two-fold:  1) to provide students with at least 45 hours of direct teaching experience with English language learners and 2) to provide students an opportunity to reflect on and demonstrate the ways that they are meeting and/or exceeding each of the 11 TESOL standards for PK-12 teacher candidates.  To achieve these goals, students build on their experiences in ENG 436 and ENG 437 and work directly with English language learners in both pull-out and push-in classroom situations at the elementary and/or secondary levels. 

ENG 489: Practicum in Literary Editing and Publishing 

Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday  3:30-4:45 pm 

Professor: Mark Neely 

The Practicum in Literary Editing and Publishing is restricted to students who are currently enrolled in the Fall 2012 section of 489. 

Students who are interested in taking this year-long, immersive learning course in 2014-2015 should contact Mark Neely (maneely@bsu.edu). 

ENG 490: Women in Literature 

Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 9:30-10:45 am 

Professor: Deborah Mix   

American Women’s Autobiography and Memoir
The traditional notion of autobiography emphasizes the “auto”—the individual who writes the story of his or her extraordinary life—and the form was historically meant to educate, to uplift, and to offer a model of how one should live one’s life.  More recent understandings, especially those informed by feminist, queer, and multicultural theories, have complicated this definition.  Now we think of autobiographies as tied to “relational” identities rather than to individuality, as produced from within a community rather than from outside it.  Furthermore, we now consider a wider variety of materials, from diaries to quilts, from traditional autobiography to experimental memoir, from short vignettes to comic books, worthy of our attention.  Autobiography and memoir raise all kinds of questions about memory and forgetting, truth and invention, self and other.  We’ll work to investigate those questions in a range of writing by American women.  This class will consider work by women writing across the centuries, beginning with Mary Rowlandson’s True History of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1662), and we’ll read work by Harriet Jacobs, Zitkala Sa, Gloria Anzaldúa, and others.  Are these the works of exceptional American women?  Perhaps.  But we’ll also listen to the voices of “ordinary” women, and we’ll consider how we might reconnect with voices that have been drowned out.  Students will read feminist theories of autobiography and memoir and will be invited to produce autobiographical writing as well as literary analysis.  Research skills, close reading, and critical writing will be emphasized.  Direct any questions to dmmix@bsu.edu. 

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ENG 492: Native American Literatures 

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday 3:00-4:15 pm 

Professor: Maria Windell 

Throughout the semester we will reflect upon and seek to describe the ways in which American Indian literature has developed from preliterate to contemporary times. In order to accomplish these goals, our readings open with essays by important American Indian scholars who seek to explain key aspects of their culture. We will then look briefly at writings that helped establish the stereotypical depictions of American Indians that have long predominated within U.S. culture, before exploring how early American Indian writers represented themselves. Exploring writings around Cherokee Removal will allow us concentrate on the intricacies of one tribe’s culture, and in the twentieth century we will examine writings from a variety of tribes. The final weeks of the class will turn to questions of “authenticity” and “Indian-ness” in contemporary American Indian fiction and poetry

Department of English
Robert Bell Building (RB), Room 297
Ball State University
Muncie, IN 47306

Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Phone: 765-285-8580
Fax: 765-285-3765
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