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Future Courses


Different semesters bring different class offerings.  Course titles link to expanded descriptions on this page that are written by faculty and more detailed than those in the Undergraduate Catalog.  General descriptions of all English courses are in the Undergraduate Catalog.

SUMMER 2015 COURSES

First Summer Session

ENG 206: Reading Literature
ENG 240: American Literature 1: The Beginnings to 1860
ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing
ENG 306: Creative Nonfiction Writing
ENG 310: Screenwriting
ENG 414: Young Adult Literature

Second Summer Session

ENG 213: Introduction to Digital Literacies
ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing
ENG 308: Poetry Writing
ENG 425: Film Studies 
ENG 490: Literature and Gender: Unreliable Women


Fall 2015

ENG 150: Introduction to Secondary English Education  
ENG 205: World Literature: Technologies of Remembrance 
ENG 206: Reading Literature
ENG 206: Reading Literature: Quests and Journeys: "Not all those who wander are lost."
ENG 210: Introduction to English Studies
ENG 213: Introduction to Digital Literacies 
ENG 215: Introduction to African American Literature
ENG 217: Introduction to Queer Literature and Queer Theory
ENG 220: Language and Society
ENG 230: Reading and Writing about Literature
ENG 231: Professional Writing
ENG 250: American Literature 2: 1860 to the Present
ENG 260: British Literature 1
ENG 280: British Literature 2
ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing
ENG 303: History of Rhetoric
ENG 306: Creative Nonfiction Writing
ENG 307: Fiction Writing
ENG 308: Poetry Writing
ENG 310: Screenwriting
ENG 320: Introduction to Linguistic Science
ENG 321: English Linguistics
ENG 328: Language and Gender
ENG 329: Editing and Style
ENG 346: Studies in Nineteenth-Century American Literature: “We the People”: Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in 19th Century American Literature 
ENG 350: Teaching Writing in Secondary Schools
ENG 364: Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature
ENG 366: British Literature 1890-1930 
ENG 395: Teaching Literature and Language in Secondary Schools
ENG 400: Special Topics in English Remembering the Holocaust 
ENG 400: Special Topics in English: Digital Literature ReviewFreak Shows and Human Zoos: The Politics of the Human Exhibit
ENG 405: Special Topics in Creative WritingFraudulent Artifacts and Appropriated Forms 
ENG 405: Special Topics in Creative WritingLiterary Apprenticeship: Writing in the 21st Century 
ENG 406: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing The Personal Essay
ENG 407: Advanced Fiction Writing
ENG 408: Advanced Poetry Writing
ENG 410: Advanced Screenwriting
ENG 412: Reading Printed Materials in the English Classroom
ENG 414: Young Adult Literature
ENG 425: Film Studies
ENG 430: Document Design and Visual Rhetoric
ENG 436: Theory and Research in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
ENG 444: Senior Seminar: Readings in American Multicultural Literature: What is an American?
ENG 444: Senior Seminar: Narrative, Games, and Literacy
ENG 444: Senior Seminar
ENG 464: Shakespeare“Something Wicked This Way Comes[?]”: Supernatural Shakespeare
ENG 489: Practicum in Literary Editing and Publishing
ENG 494: Queer Literature/ Queer Theory
ENG 498: Post-Colonial Studies

First Summer Session

ENG 206: Reading Literature
Section 1: Monday-Friday 2:30-4:05 PM  

Professor: Lupe Linares

This course is an introduction to the nature and interpretation of literary works and to reading and writing critically about literature. Throughout the course, we will study fiction, literary nonfiction, poetry, drama, and film. We will examine how authors use literary techniques to make meaning and consider the many ways that readers then interpret that meaning. In doing so, we will employ a variety of critical approaches that will transform and enrich our appreciation of all kinds of texts—both those that are traditionally appreciated in the academy and those that are not. 

ENG 240: American Literature 1: The Beginnings to 1860
Section 1: Monday-Friday 9:15-10:50 AM 

Professor: Robert Habich

The purpose of this course is to expose students to a diverse selection of works, writers, and movements in American literature up to the Civil War, with an emphasis on authors  from the period most likely to be taught in public schools.  Final grade will be based on a midterm exam, a final exam, and class participation, including frequent quizzes over the reading.

ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing
Section 1: Monday-Friday 9:15-10:45 AM 

Professor: Sean Lovelace

English 285 is an introduction to writing poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. The course will focus on development of writing craft, obtainment of a critical/literary vocabulary, and a reading, examination, and discussion of established authors and poets. This class will always be active in our learning! We will read a great amount of excellent material; we will write a great amount, and strive to make it excellent. We will attempt to spark and develop our creativity. We will complete a plethora of writing exercises and group activities. We will create our own original poems, stories, flash fictions, and essays. Overall, we will combine serious work and fun—as in intellectual stimulation, but always with a purpose. Our purpose in 285 is to improve as readers and writers of multiple genres. This we will do.

Texts:

·        Flash Fiction: 72 Very Short Stories by Denise Thomas, James Thomas, Tom Hazuka.
·        A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by Dave Eggers
·        The Road by Cormac McCarthy
·        A Gringo Like Me
·        Poetry 180.
·        We will also have handouts and online texts.

Contact Professor Lovelace (salovelace@bsu.edu) with any questions. 

ENG 306: Creative Nonfiction Writing
Section 1: Monday-Friday 12:45-2:20 PM 

Professor: Todd McKinney

What is Creative Nonfiction (CNF)? Are there different types of CNF? How is CNF different than journalism? What is a fact? Any different than truth? What is truth? A matter of perspective? And what is Perspective anyway? Is that the same as a narrator? How is a CNF narrator different than a fiction narrator? Or a poet? Who tells the truth? How does one put the truth into words that are both artful and honest?

These are just a few of the questions we will take up this semester in this introduction to the literary genre of CNF, which will provide the student with the opportunity to practice writing CNF and to further explore its possibilities by reading and discussing a number of essays. In short, this class asks the student to write and read a lot. Furthermore, the class will introduce the student to the subgenres of CNF and to the key concepts and terms needed to be a part of the conversation that is CNF. The assignments and exercises will challenge students to think critically and creatively to better understand how we make meaning out of language and experience so we can present it to a reader to continue the discussion of what it means to be alive on earth.

Course assignments will include drafts, workshop responses, quizzes and reading responses, and a portfolio.

ENG 310: Screenwriting
Section 1: Monday-Friday 2:30-4:05 PM 

Professor: Ashley Donnelly

English 310 introduces students to the craft and practice of screenwriting.  In this 5-week course students will complete at least 1 short film script and possibly other short projects.  We will study short films as a way of understanding the screenwriting process.  Students will gain an understanding of the creative process and work through the various steps required to produce a full-length script. In class we will discuss the theory and practice of the process, watch and analyze short films, and work as a group to develop your skills as a writer.  A large portion of class time will be devoted to work shopping scripts in progress.

ENG 310: Screenwriting
Section 10: Monday-Friday 11:00 AM-12:35 PM  

Professor: Ashley Donnelly

English 310 introduces students to the craft and practice of screenwriting.  In this 5-week course students will complete at least 1 short film script and possibly other short projects.  We will study short films as a way of understanding the screenwriting process.  Students will gain an understanding of the creative process and work through the various steps required to produce a full-length script. In class we will discuss the theory and practice of the process, watch and analyze short films, and work as a group to develop your skills as a writer.  A large portion of class time will be devoted to work shopping scripts in progress.

ENG 414: Young Adult Literature
Section 1: Monday-Friday 11:00 AM-12:35 PM 

Professor: Pamela Hartman

English 414 focuses on recent literature, representing multiple genres, that is suitable for young adult readers.  The emphasis is primarily on the reading and analysis of literature with some attention given to methodology.  The goals of the course including creating a community of readers and learners who will respond both aesthetically and analytically to literature and who will become familiar with the wide range of Young Adult Literature (YAL) as well as develop an appreciation of YAL as a genre of study.  In addition, we will explore the value of YAL as a means to stimulate young adults’ interest in reading, to bridge children’s and adult literature, and to encourage the habit of lifelong reading.

Second Summer Session


ENG 213: Introduction to Digital Literacies
Section 1: Monday-Friday 2:30-4:05 PM

Professor: Rory Lee

This course asks students to challenge the traditional understanding of literacy as the ability to read and write by asking them to engage with not only the idea of literacy as a situated act of knowing and doing inextricably linked to technology(ies) but also the idea of literacies—plural.  More specifically, students will explore what literacy means and looks like in the context of the digital.  Phrased as a question:  what sort of literacy practices do we enact in the digital realm and how, if at all, are they similar to, different from, and filtered through ones we enact in analog culture? 

To assist them in this exploration of digital ways of knowing and doing, students will be introduced to a brief history and some select theories of media, the genres common to them, and the connections between media, old and new.  In addition, students will analyze and produce with various media, technologies, and composing tools in an effort to understand the ways they inform literate practices.  In terms of production, students will employ various digital practices such as remediation and remix and researching in a publish-then-filter economy. 

Throughout the course, students will grapple with the social, political, economic, and ethical consequences of these (often emerging) digital literacy practices.  In particular, they’ll take up the following questions:  how is literacy both descriptive and evaluative, how are literacies situated hierarchically, how does access impact and affect literacy acquisition and instruction, how does our culture digitally make sense of and comment on culture writ large, how does the digital allow groups to form and act in ways they couldn’t previously, and what happens when the grassroots culture fostered through digital literacy practices intersects with corporate culture?

ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing
Section 2: Monday-Friday 9:15-10:50 AM  

Professor: Todd McKinney

As an introduction to Creative Writing, this class will provide the student with the opportunity to practice writing fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. To practice our own writing, we will explore the possibilities of the three genres by reading and discussing a number of stories, poems, and essays.  In short, this class asks the student to write a lot and read a lot—the best way to become a better writer.  The assignments and exercises will challenge students to think critically and creatively to better understand how we make/shape/bend/warp meaning out of language and experience as we use language to continue exploring what it means to be alive on earth.

Course assignments will include drafts, workshop responses, quizzes and reading responses, and a portfolio.

ENG 308: Poetry Writing
Section 800: Online Course  

Professor: Elizabeth Whiteacre

In English 308 online, you will explore contemporary poetry, focusing on the art of reading, writing, and responding to poems. Throughout this fast-paced class, we will discuss the craft of writing poems as we write our own. We’ll experience ways to avoid writer’s block, mature our voices, explore new subjects and forms, and more. Through workshop and other revision techniques, you’ll continue to develop your “editor’s eye.”

Assignments will include daily writing exercises and discussion, original poems, workshops, revision exercises, readings (including Kooser’s The Poetry Home Repair Manual), and the development of your own poetry anthology. At the end of the semester, you will produce an eChapbook of your poems and submit a poem for publication.

ENG 425: Film Studies 
Section 1: Monday-Friday 12:45-2:20 PM 
 (Lab) Tuesday, Thursday 12:45-3:00 PM 

Professor: Matt Hartman

This course teaches students to analyze films critically.  We’ll examine how formal elements such as mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, and sound work together to produce meaning. We’ll explore topics such as film narrative, genre, ideology, and stardom, as well as different kinds of films, including fiction, documentary, and experimental films.  We’ll consider how films affect us personally and how they function socially.  The course’s main goal is to make the invisible visible, to enable us to see and think about things we may not have noticed in movies before. In addition, the course will expose students to a variety of great films in different styles and genres, hopefully broadening your appreciation for film.

Each week we will watch and discuss two movies (to be determined).  Last summer’s films included Chinatown, The 400 Blows, Written on the Wind, Road to Perdition, His Girl Friday, Battleship Potemkin, Psycho, Chungking Express, and The Thin Blue Line.

Course assignments include response papers, short analytic papers, a sequence-analysis essay, quizzes, and an exam.  Our text will be Looking at Movies: An Introduction to Film (Norton).

ENG 490: Literature and Gender
Unreliable Women
Section 1: Monday-Friday 11:00 AM-12:35 PM 

Professor: Molly Ferguson

One stereotype of women is that they are emotional rather than rational, inconsistent rather than steady, and that they think in a circular rather than linear way. This notion paves the way for the idea that women are not to be trusted, or further still, that their word in a court of law is less reliable than a man’s. With that negative judgement in mind, we will read works of literature that feature women characters as unreliable narrators, who may or may not be telling us the whole story. Using our primary texts and some feminist readings, we will probe at the question of whether or not “unreliability” can be recuperated for women as a strategy of withholding that gives them agency. Expect a presentation, short responses, and an essay as well as frequent in-class projects and activities.

FALL 2015


ENG 150: Introduction to Secondary English Education  
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM 

Professor: Darolyn “Lyn” Jones

Content includes constructing an informed vision of English and English teaching, developing basic skills for teaching English, and beginning preparation for teacher licensure.


ENG 150: Introduction to Secondary English Education 
Section 2: Tuesday, Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM  

Professor: Darolyn “Lyn” Jones

Content includes constructing an informed vision of English and English teaching, developing basic skills for teaching English, and beginning preparation for teacher licensure.


ENG 205: World Literature
Technologies of Remembrance 
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 3:30-4:45 PM  

Professor: Kristine Kotecki

This course focuses on how personal and collective memories are imaginatively mediated in response to specific political contexts. Literature that responds to historical events might reinforce dominant versions of history or present counter-histories, for example, and it might highlight documentary traces or emphasize the emotions that surround historical events. Themed “Technologies of Remembrance”, this course will introduce methodological approaches and ethical questions to bring to the study of literature from contexts and in languages unfamiliar to many North American students. It thus serves as a foundation for students who want to pursue more in-depth literary study of the works of particular regions, nations, and cities in future courses and projects. 


ENG 206: Reading Literature
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:00-9:50 AM 

Professor: Robert Habich

This section of ENG 206 focuses on appreciating and enjoying literature in a variety of genres: long and short fiction, poetry, drama, and memoir. Assignments include two short response papers, two analytical essays, and a final exam. Designed for non-majors and creative writing minors. 


ENG 206: Reading Literature
Quests and Journeys: "Not all those who wander are lost."
Section 2: Tuesday, Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM  

Professor: JoAnne Ruvoli

English 206 is a course designed to introduce students to reading and writing critically about literature. We will investigate texts from a variety of genres to examine the meaning and context of writers concerned with “Quests and Journeys.” Besides poems and short stories, we will read the following major texts: Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, Jack Kerouac’s On the Road, Barbara Shoup’s Looking for Jack Kerouac, J.R.R. Tolkien's The Fellowship of the Ring, Luis Urrea’s The Devil’s Highway and Cheryl Strayed’s Wild. Assignments will include three short papers, one final paper, a midterm and a final exam. 


ENG 206: Reading Literature
Section 3: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12:00-12:50 PM

Professor: Lupe Linares

See Instructor for course description 


ENG 210: Introduction to English Studies
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:00-11:50 AM  

Professor: TBA


ENG 213: Introduction to Digital Literacies 
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: TBA


ENG 213: Introduction to Digital Literacies
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12:00-12:50 PM

Professor: TBA


ENG 213: Introduction to Digital Literacies 
Section 3: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 2:00-2:50 PM

Professor: Rory Lee

This course asks students to challenge the traditional understanding of literacy as the ability to read and write by asking them to engage with not only the idea of literacy as a situated act of knowing and doing inextricably linked to technology(ies) but also the idea of literacies—plural.  More specifically, students will explore what literacy means and looks like in the context of the digital.  Phrased as a question:  what sort of literacy practices do we enact in the digital realm and how, if at all, are they similar to, different from, and filtered through ones we enact in analog culture? 

To assist them in this exploration of digital ways of knowing and doing, students will be introduced to a brief history and some select theories of media, the genres common to them, and the connections between media, old and new.  In addition, students will analyze and produce with various media, technologies, and composing tools in an effort to understand the ways they inform literate practices.  In terms of production, students will employ various digital practices such as remediation and remix and researching in a publish-then-filter economy. 

Throughout the course, students will grapple with the social, political, economic, and ethical consequences of these (often emerging) digital literacy practices.  In particular, they’ll take up the following questions:  how is literacy both descriptive and evaluative, how are literacies situated hierarchically, how does access impact and affect literacy acquisition and instruction, how does our culture digitally make sense of and comment on culture writ large, how does the digital allow groups to form and act in ways they couldn’t previously, and what happens when the grassroots culture fostered through digital literacy practices intersects with corporate culture?




ENG 215: Introduction to African American Literature
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM 

Professor: Emily Rutter 

Call and Response will move chronologically from the nineteenth century into the contemporary era, exploring a wide range of African American texts. We will examine these texts with three central questions in mind: How do African American writers respond to the calls of slave spirituals and, later, blues, jazz, and hip hop artists? How do writers call and respond to each other, across decades and even centuries? Finally, what kinds of calls do African American writers issue to readers, and how do they ask us to respond? Assignments will include an oral presentation; short textual analyses that will build up to a research paper; and a written final exam. No prior knowledge of African American literature and/or musical traditions is required. All Ball State students are welcome.




ENG 217: Introduction to Queer Literature and Queer Theory
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM 

Professor:  Rai Peterson

Queer literature/queer theory explores how writers and characters who are "othered" or treated differently based upon their personal gender identity view and interact with the predominately straight world. We will read a variety of literary texts and watch some movies by and about LGBTQA people or that raise concerns that help us better understand members of those groups.  Assignments will include a class presentation, a researched paper, and a final examination that gives students the opportunity to reflect on what they have learned in the course.  The class is open to all Ball State students; straight allies will find it as useful as queer-identified students.


ENG 220: Language and Society
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:00-10:50 AM  

Professor:  TBA


ENG 220: Language and Society
Section 2: Tuesday, Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM 

Professor: Megumi Hamada

This course introduces the nature and role of language in our society, focusing on sociolinguistic variations and attitudes associated with the variations. Throughout the topics, the course aims to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to make informed decisions regarding language, in both professional settings and every-day activities.


ENG 220: Language and Society 
Section 3: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 1:00-1:50 PM 

Professor: Elizabeth Riddle

This course will introduce students to the nature of human language and its connections to culture.  We will look at issues in variation in English related to region, gender, age, and socioeconomic status as well, cross-cultural communication with native speakers of other languages, public and educational policy regarding language use in the U.S., personal attitudes towards language variation, and to the history of English and how it bears on current usage and social attitudes.  The course will challenge some popular conceptions about language.  By means of case studies and other activities, we will examine how language use is portrayed in the media, identify assumptions underlying attitudes towards language in the U.S., and research the issues to come to informed conclusions.


ENG 230: Reading and Writing about Literature
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 11:00 AM-12:15 PM 

Professor:  Matt Hartman

In this course we will practice different critical approaches to reading and writing about literature in order to expand your repertoire of strategies for making sense of stories, poems, plays, and other literary texts. You should learn how to find things to say about literature and how to develop those ideas into persuasive arguments focusing on literary analysis.​


ENG 230: Reading and Writing about Literature
Section 2: Tuesday, Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM 

Professor: Emily Rutter

Contact professor directly for course description.


ENG 230: Reading and Writing about Literature
Section 3: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:00-10:50 AM  

Professor: Joyce Huff

What are your assumptions when pick up a work of literature? What questions do you ask of it? What expectations do you have? And how do those questions and expectations affect what you get out of the text?

In ENG 230, we will explore these questions and learn more about the wide variety of contexts and frameworks available for making meaning from literary texts. A reader approaching one of Aesop’s fables, for example, might be interested in the moral of the tale, but he or she might also be interested in what codes of ethics and philosophies underlie these morals or how the ancient Greeks perceived and represented animals (often the protagonists of these fables) or how fables differ from other types of narrative or any number of other questions. Which questions you ask of a text determine which methodologies you use to find answers as well as the kinds of answers you reach.

In this course, you will become familiar with different theories of how literature functions as well as different research methods and types of literary conversations. You will practice working with these in order to gain the skill and comfort-level needed to employ them in your own scholarly work. You will also learn effective ways of presenting your own written arguments about literature.  Finally, you will be given the opportunity to examine your own basic assumptions about texts, authors and readers and to position your own scholarship within the world of contemporary literary studies.

ENG 230: Reading and Writing about Literature
Section 4: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 2:00-2:50 PM

Professor: Molly Ferguson

Our semester theme is “the young adult mind,” and we will be reading works from each of the genres through the perspective of child or young adult characters. Works will include plays, a novel, and selected short stories, films, and poetry from around the world. We will discuss how a character comes to terms with his/her identity and what kind of a struggle it takes to do so. In addition, we will try to determine what collective strands (culture, ethnicity, nationality, religion, gender, etc.) make up a person’s identity. These texts will serve as a springboard for our discussion as we move toward an understanding of what it means for each of us to be both critical readers and writers. 


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ENG 231: Professional Writing
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM 

Professor: Eva Grouling Snider

In this course, we will explore professional writing: what it means to write for and with others, to design and create content for complex work environments, and to collaborate on primary research in a professional context. We will begin by discussing the professional in professional writing, including concepts of professionalism and professionalism in the production of documents. Along the way, you will also learn about common genres of professional writing, including proposals, memos, e-mail, bibliographies, and reports.

The main line of the course, though, will be a primary professional research project on users of a technology. Near the beginning of the semester, you and your research team (of 4 or 5 members) will write a proposal for a research project that incorporates surveys, interviews, and another research method to begin to explore how everyday users of a particular technology interact with that technology. From there, you will learn the theories and practices of conducting primary research in a professional context, including survey building, interviewing, and other research methods. You will ultimately produce a white paper, which presents your research findings and suggests directions for future research, and a fact sheet, which distills your findings into an easily accessed form.

This course will immerse you in various concepts central to professional writing, including qualitative field research, project management, visual rhetoric and document design, and professionalism. You will be expected to produce high quality deliverables grounded in real-world situations.


ENG 250: American Literature 2
1860 to the Present
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Professor: Andrea Wolfe

This course will survey American authors and literary movements from 1860 to the present. It will include texts from a broad range of genres as well as major and minority traditions. Subtitled “American Texts, American Contexts,” the course will particularly focus on methods for reading selected texts in appropriate historical, cultural, political, critical, and theoretical contexts. Students will complete both creative and critical assignments, including a multi-modal presentation and a series of short papers.


ENG 260: British Literature 1
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 3:30-4:45 PM 

Professor: Vanessa Rapatz

Our focus in this course will be literature written in English before 1780. We will look at a wide range of texts by various authors as we explore the constantly changing English language and the emergence of key literary genres. As we engage with the language and form of these texts, we will also explore the way the authors respond to changing circumstances and new ideas. We will consider, for example, the effects of technology such as the printing press, the impact of Bible translation and nationalism on the rising prestige of English, and expanding forms of self- expression. While rooted in Great Britain, this course will consider England's relationship to other traditions at home and abroad.  We will pay particular attention to Colonial America as a new site of English literary production and consumption in the period.  As you explore the multiple aspects of these texts, you will build your skills as readers of poetry, drama, and prose; as writers; and as researchers.


ENG 280: British Literature 2
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12:00-12:50 PM

Professor:   Patrick Collier

The major building blocks of the world we now inhabit—modern nation-states, industrial capitalism, media culture, philosophies and political forms emphasizing individual liberty, and more—took shape during the last two hundred or so years. In these same years, England sought, gained, and fought to maintain (and regain) its status as the wealthiest and most powerful nation in the world. Writers responded to and helped to fuel these changes; they imagined, applauded, recorded, advocated, and critiqued them. This semester, we will survey the contributions and responses of British literary writers and literary culture to modernity by reading, commenting on, and writing about a wide variety of texts from the past two-and-a-quarter centuries.  The class will give you strategies for reading and analyzing texts in historical context and lots of practice in doing so.  In the process you will be developing your critical thinking and oral and written communication skills.


ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing

Introduction to the craft, terminology, and techniques of multiple genres, including fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction.

Contact professor directly for course description.

Section 10: Monday, Wednesday 6:30-7:45 PM
Professor: Brian Morrison

Section 11: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:00-10:50 AM
Professor: Todd McKinney

Section 12: Tuesday, Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM
Professor: Peter Davis

Section 13: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 1:00-1:50 PM
Professor: Emily Scalzo

Section 14: Tuesday, Thursday 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
Professor: Peter Bethanis

Section 15: Monday, Wednesday 5:00-6:15 PM
Professor: Brian Morrison

Section 16: Tuesday, Thursday 3:30-4:45 PM
Professor: Peter Bethanis 

Section 17: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 3:00-3:50 PM
Professor: Emily Scalzo

Section 18: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:00-11:50 AM
Professor: Liz Whiteacre


ENG 303: History of Rhetoric
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 1:00-1:50 PM 

Professor: Paul Ranieri

Beginning with ancient rhetoric and focusing on major historical periods, ENG 303 surveys the historical development of rhetoric, emphasizing the cultural context of ideas and the construction of rhetorical “traditions.”  ENG 303 is a required course for the Rhetoric and Writing Major, and can serve as an elective for the English Studies, Literature, and Creative Writing Majors.


ENG 306: Creative Nonfiction Writing
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday 2:00-3:15 PM 

Professor: Silas Hansen

The word essay comes from the French verb “essayer”—to try.  This class will focus on personal essays, which are our attempts to understand something: how a significant event in childhood impacted us, how we came around to a particular way of thinking, or what a series of seemingly unconnected events might mean when put into context.  We will focus on the questions—what the questions mean, how to ask better ones, and the various ways we might attempt to answer them—rather than the answers themselves.  You will read a great deal of published creative nonfiction (including work by writers like Joan Didion, James Baldwin, Cheryl Strayed, Eula Biss, and John Jeremiah Sullivan), identify the purpose of/practice using various craft techniques through in-class and out-of-class writing exercises, and then explore your own burning questions in essay drafts that you will share in both small group peer review and full class workshops.


ENG 306: Creative Nonfiction Writing
Section 2: Tuesday, Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM 

Professor: Todd McKinney

See Instructor for course description


ENG 307: Fiction Writing
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:00-9:50 AM 

Professor: Craig O’Hara

This course centers on the fundamentals of writing the literary short story—vivid concrete language, three-dimensional characters, complex plot—with an emphasis on the student’s ability to write clearly and dramatically. The focus of this course will be the writing workshop and the extensive revision that all writers employ to develop their work into polished pieces. The course also includes discussion of, and hands-on practice with, elements of the craft and in-depth class discussions of the techniques employed by authors recognized in the field.

In addition to the writing workshop, assignments include short developmental pieces and critical reading responses to contemporary works of fiction. At the end of the semester students will turn in a portfolio of revised stories and a submission of work to a literary magazine.

Texts will include:

Janet Burroway’s Writing Fiction, including contemporary works of short fiction by writers such as Junot Diaz, Maura Stanton, and Sherman Alexie.


ENG 307:  Fiction Writing
Section 2: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12:00-12:50 PM  

Professor: Craig O’Hara

This course centers on the fundamentals of writing the literary short story—vivid concrete language, three-dimensional characters, complex plot—with an emphasis on the student’s ability to write clearly and dramatically. The focus of this course will be the writing workshop and the extensive revision that all writers employ to develop their work into polished pieces. The course also includes discussion of, and hands-on practice with, elements of the craft and in-depth class discussions of the techniques employed by authors recognized in the field.

In addition to the writing workshop, assignments include short developmental pieces and critical reading responses to contemporary works of fiction. At the end of the semester students will turn in a portfolio of revised stories and a submission of work to a literary magazine.

Texts will include:

Janet Burroway’s Writing Fiction, including contemporary works of short fiction by writers such as Junot Diaz, Maura Stanton, and Sherman Alexie.


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ENG 307: Fiction Writing
Section 3: Tuesday, Thursday 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM 

Professor: Angela Jackson Brown

The course is designed to take students (and the professor) further into the art and craft of fiction than can be covered in a creative writing overview course. It raises questions about the value of fiction, what makes fiction good, successful, outstanding and beautiful, and how to workshop and Re-Vision your fiction. The course is also designed for those who wish to develop a writing routine on their own, as well as those who plan to continue the study of fiction in ENG 407 or some other upper level fiction writing class or workshop.

Texts will include:

Janet Burroway’s Writing Fiction


ENG 308: Poetry Writing
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:00-11:50 AM

Professor: TBA 


ENG 308: Poetry Writing
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM

Professor: Peter Bethanis

In this course the art and craft of writing poetry will be explored with workshops and texts.  The course will cover modern and contemporary poets.  We will also use a variety of heuristics and strategies to develop each student's poetry.  Poetry is viewed as a process over time to trigger each poem to its fullest potential.  Students will participate in collaborative workshops to help one another as a community of writers.  Students will write about poems covered in texts as well as creating their own poetry projects.  


ENG 310: Screenwriting
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:00-9:50 AM 

Professor: TBA


ENG 310: Screenwriting
Section 2:  Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:00-11:50 AM 

Professor: TBA 


ENG 310: Screenwriting
Section 3: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 1:00-1:50 PM   

Professor: TBA


ENG 310: Screenwriting
Section 4: Tuesday, Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM  

Professor: TBA


ENG 320: Introduction to Linguistic Science
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:00-11:50 AM 

Professor:  Mai Kuha

Contact professor directly for course description.


ENG 320: Introduction to Linguistic Science
Section 2: Tuesday, Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM 

Professor: Mai Kuha

Contact professor directly for course description.


ENG 321: English Linguistics
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday 3:00-4:15 PM 

Professor: Mary Lou Vercellotti

This course studies the major structures of English, with particular emphasis on phrase and clause level syntax. In addition to learning the basics, we will learn about the relationship between the form and function of different structures. We will discuss language in use, think about the impact of different constructions, and consider grammaticality in context. Since linguists and grammarians use different terms, we will compare the terms used by each and the applications of the different terms. The course will cover the basic concepts and terminology, but perhaps unlike previous classes about English grammar that present a “rule” to memorize, we will use language examples to discover patterns and linguistic choices, as well as exceptions to the patterns and the effect the different structures have on the reader. You will learn the basic tools of linguistic analysis and how to support your answers with linguistic reasoning.



ENG 321: English Linguistics
Section 2: Tuesday, Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM 

Professor: Mary Lou Vercellotti

This course studies the major structures of English, with particular emphasis on phrase and clause level syntax. In addition to learning the basics, we will learn about the relationship between the form and function of different structures. We will discuss language in use, think about the impact of different constructions, and consider grammaticality in context. Since linguists and grammarians use different terms, we will compare the terms used by each and the applications of the different terms. The course will cover the basic concepts and terminology, but perhaps unlike previous classes about English grammar that present a “rule” to memorize, we will use language examples to discover patterns and linguistic choices, as well as exceptions to the patterns and the effect the different structures have on the reader. You will learn the basic tools of linguistic analysis and how to support your answers with linguistic reasoning.



ENG 328: Language and Gender
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12:00-12:50 PM 

Professor: Mai Kuha

Contact professor directly for course description.


ENG 329: Editing and Style
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM 

Professor: Paul Ranieri

Introduction to approaches to editing, style, and writing conventions; intensive practice to editing, collaborative writing, and critique appropriate for students in professional writing or other writing intensive majors or careers.



ENG 346: Studies in Nineteenth-Century American Literature
“We the People”: Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in 19th Century American Literature 
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 3:00-3:50 PM 

Professor: Lupe Linares

The United States entered the 19th century an independent nation free of its colonial constraints. Both the “Declaration of Independence” and the “United States Constitution” work to define what it means to be American and how the physical location impacts identity and systems of value. At the same time as documenting what it means to be part of this place, these texts also exclude some people. This course will examine how nineteenth century authors address the question: “Who counts as an American?” We will look at texts by a variety of authors, including María Amparo Ruiz de Burton, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Catherine Maria Sedgwick, and others. 


ENG 350: Teaching Writing in Secondary Schools
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM 

Professor: Susanna Benko

This course explores various strategies and issues concerned in teaching of writing in secondary schools.  We focus on important aspects of writing instruction including (but not limited to) task/assessment design, lesson planning, grammar instruction, and formative/summative feedback on student work.  We also address how technology and 21st century literacies can be leveraged both in instruction and in student writing more broadly.

Prereq:  Open only to English/Language Arts Teaching Majors.  Must have passed DP2. 


ENG 364: Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 2:00-2:50 PM  

Professor: Adam Beach

This course will examine British texts that engage the powerful Ottoman and Moroccan empires during the long eighteenth century, especially texts that document the fascinating slave institutions of these cultures.  This course will introduce students to the wide variety of English slave and captivity narratives written during the Restoration and eighteenth century as well as literary renderings of these experiences in a variety of plays, travel narratives, and fictions.  

This is a fairly new and exciting area of research within eighteenth-century studies, and it lends itself to original research projects on the part of undergraduate students.  I have designed the class so that students will become engaged in the emerging scholarly conversation about the representation of the experiences of English slaves and will think deeply about how we know what we know about them.  Additionally, students will engage in a wiki-project in which they will actively create and publish knowledge about English slave narratives in Wikipedia.  During the course of the semester, students will learn valuable primary content, hone their skills as researchers, learn about the ways that knowledge is constructed in both academic and collaborative internet communities, and actively participate in that construction through their wiki projects.

Please contact Dr. Adam R. Beach (x8584 or arbeach@bsu.edu) if you have any questions.


ENG 366: British Literature 
1890-1930 
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:00-10:50 AM 

Professor: Patrick Collier

In this class, we will work collaboratively to interpret and situate a range of texts produced in England and Ireland in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries.  Together, we will develop strategies for reading some of this period’s notoriously difficult texts, and we will build a sense of why serious literature took the particular (and peculiar) directions it took in these years.  You will become familiar with the major literary-historical accounts of the period, and we will work together to clarify, challenge, and qualify these accounts.  While most of our class time will be dedicated to acknowledged major (i.e. “canonical”) works, much of your independent work will lead you to more obscure materials, which will feed into a collaborative class project aimed at giving a fuller picture of the universe of print culture as it existed in these years. Texts will include work by Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, Rebecca West, T. S. Eliot, W. B. Yeats, E. M. Forster, and others.


ENG 395: Teaching Literature and Language in Secondary Schools
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 3:30-4:45 PM 

Professor: Pam Hartman

Contact professor directly for course description.


ENG 400: Special Topics in English 
Remembering the Holocaust 
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM  

Professor: Frank Felsenstein

Three quarters of a century after the start of World War 2, should the Holocaust still hold much meaning for those living at the advent of a new Millennium? When those that witnessed it are no more, will there still be an obligation to preserve and make iconic the memory of such a flagrant “crime against humanity”? What, if anything, should we remember? What should be learned? Is it not best to forget -- and forgive? If so, why has the State of Indiana (along with some other states) now mandated the teaching of the Holocaust in its public schools? Can we make any sense of our fascinated fear of the unspeakable? The seminar will interrogate the impulse to promote the Holocaust as for many the single most defining catastrophe of the twentieth century. It will investigate the disparity between the comparative silence in the years immediately after World War 2 and the cultural spotlighting in recent times of the atrocities and sufferings of the Nazi era (called by some the "Americanization of the Holocaust"). It will also explore the question of "authenticating" the trauma of the Holocaust, and why there are many individuals who describe themselves as second or third generation survivors. We shall consider the continuing influence of the Holocaust and of acts of genocide on religious belief (where was God?), on education (have we learned any lessons? how do we explain to the next generation?), on Jewish and Christian relations, on the recurrence of anti-Semitism today, and more broadly, on the cultural imagination. Particular aspects that will be given prominence are the documentation of the Holocaust by witnesses through letters, diaries, and memoirs, and its literary and cinematic representations. We are planning to have at least one immediate witness meet with the class. Although this does not purport to be a sequential study of the history of the Nazi era, students will be encouraged to keep a course journal in which they should chart the progression of their thinking about the Holocaust and its significance.  Please feel free to contact me at felsenstein@bsu.edu with any questions.


ENG 400: Special Topics in English: Digital Literature Review
Freak Shows and Human Zoos: The Politics of the Human Exhibit 
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday 5:00-6:15 PM

Professor: Joyce Huff

Contribute to and Help Produce Issue #3 of the Digital Literature Review: Freak Shows and Human Zoos.

In September of 1906, The New York Times announced the display of a bushman named Ota Benga at the monkey house of the New York Zoological Park. Benga shared his cage, first with chimpanzees and later with an orangutan and parrot. Despite contemporary voices that drew attention to the dehumanizing treatment of Benga, including a protest led by African-American clergy, the exhibit proved both popular and successful.

Ota Benga serves as an extreme example of the phenomenon of the human exhibit. In his case, the context in which he appeared served to reinforce a racist understanding of human biology that positioned bushmen next to animals in a great evolutionary chain-of-being. But Benga is far from the first human being to be displayed in this context. In 1896, one hundred Sioux were exhibited at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden. Some of the earliest zoos, in Renaissance Italy and Mexico, were reported to contain humans as well as animals, and, significantly, these were racial others and people with disabilities: those marked as “different” from the norm.

Zoological exhibits are only one form the exhibition of human beings has taken throughout history. Humans have been displayed, both living and deceased, in a variety of contexts for differing purposes: ethnographic exhibits, such as the Parisian Exposition Coloniale as well as in world fairs and natural history museums; medical and anatomical exhibits, such as Body Worlds and The Mütter Museum; and freak shows, such as P.T. Barnum’s side shows and the Ripley’s Believe-It-Or-Not television series. And the human exhibit has been deployed as a trope in literature and popular culture in works as disparate as Kafka’s “A Hunger Artist” and the latest season of American Horror Story. Some performers have even used the space of human exhibit as a site of protest. For example, performance artist Jennifer Miller, a woman with facial hair, uses the freak show stage to challenge the othering of those who don’t conform to gendered expectations.

In this course, we will investigate the larger philosophical, political and artistic issues underpinning sites of human display and the debates and controversies to which they have given rise. We will read theories of human display, focusing largely on the freak show, and examine literary and filmic representations, such as Tod Browning’s Freaks and Katherine Dunn’s Geek Love.

Students will carry out research over two semesters that will culminate in their capstone project in the Spring, a project that will be considered for publication in the third issue of the Digital Literature Review (DLR).

As part of the DLR team, students will also be responsible for contributing to and producing the DLR blog (www.bsudlr.wordpress.com), for designing and creating the third issue of the DLR (www.bsu.edu/dlr), and for publicizing and promoting our work as well as soliciting and editing papers from undergraduate students around the globe.  In addition to earning course credit and immersive learning experience, you will gain experience in research and scholarship, professional writing and editing, digital design and publishing, and emerging media and publicity.

While most students will earn 3 hours for ENG 400 in the fall and 3 hours for ENG 444 in the spring, course credits are negotiable, and I will work with you to fit the class into your program of study and to negotiate with your home department about course equivalencies.

Contact Dr. Joyce Huff (jlhuff@bsu.edu; 285-8415) if you are interested in participating.



ENG 405: Special Topics in Creative Writing
Fraudulent Artifacts and Appropriated Forms 
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 5:00-6:15 PM 

Professor: Silas Hansen

David Shields and Matthew Vollmer define a fraudulent artifact as “a text purporting to be a particular form of writing—a journal entry, a note, a yearbook letter, an e-mail, a transcript of a speech, a grocery list, a musical score, a screenplay—which also tells a story, stirs thought and emotion, inspires inquiry, initiates action, and/or calls into question that which is—or has purported to be—real.”  In this class, you will study essays, stories, and poems that do just that.  You will read Harvard-outline-essays, short-story-police-blotters, and letter-poems.  You will learn the rules and purposes of several poetry forms and figure out how to write a sonnet-essay or a sestina-story.  You will identify artifacts from your daily life—syllabi, reading quizzes, love letters, restaurant menus—and figure out what ideas—in the form of fiction or nonfiction, prose or poetry—their genre conventions can help you explore.


ENG 405: Special Topics in Creative Writing
Literary Apprenticeship: Writing in the 21st Century 
Section 2: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:00-10:50 AM 

Professor:  Jill Christman

In this advanced special topics creative writing class--Literary Apprenticeship: Writing in the 21st Century--you will build your own intensive course of study focused on the career and work of a single contemporary literary author of your choice.*  We will spend our time at the beginning of the semester talking about what it means to be a member of the larger literary community, and then we will move into focused research, close reading, and writing based on our individual writers. Course requirements will include: regular writing assignments guided by me but inspired by the work of your author (imitations, annotations, forms, constraints), a book review, a memorization exercise, a publishing history of your writer across time (and possibly genre), an author interview (yes, your writer must be alive), a full-class presentation in which you teach your writer to the class, and a final creative project portfolio showcasing your semester-long apprenticeship to your writer.  Throughout, we’ll think about what it means to work and live as a publishing writer in the 21st Century.

Successful students in this class will be curious, passionate, & self-motivated: if that’s you, sign up and join in the choose-your-own-author adventure!  (Required texts will be determined individually.)

*I will provide a list of possibilities at the beginning of class, and you will have the opportunity to propose your own, so here, “choice” is defined as a cooperative, directed choice.


ENG 406: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing 
The Personal Essay
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12:00-12:50 PM 

Professor: Jill Christman

In this advanced creative nonfiction class we will focus on the art of transforming experience into art.  Using our own lives and perceptions as the lens through which we record the world, we’ll start by writing about the self (in a memoir piece) and as the term progresses we’ll expand our scope to write about things beyond the self—other people, other places, other ways of living in the world. We’ll work on the nuts-and-bolts of the writing (research and interview strategies, structure, point of view, storytelling, language) as we tackle the big questions facing us:  What do I want to write about and why?  What about memory and forgetting?  What shape might best serve the essay?  What does it mean to say something true?

Course requirements will include:  quizzes, regular writing exercises, reading responses, workshop critiques, two long essays, and a final portfolio. 

Texts:
·           Best American Essays 2014 (ed. John Jeremiah Sullivan, series ed. Robert Atwan)
·           Touchstone Anthology of Creative Nonfiction (ed. Michael Martone and Lex Williford)
·           plus a selection of must-read essays at the professor’s discretion


ENG 407: Advanced Fiction Writing
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM 

Professor: Sean Lovelace

In this class we will continue many of the concepts of English 307, with an expectation of advanced complexity. The class will focus on student and professional manuscripts in the genre of FLASH FICTION (complete stories—with interest in structure, language, and theme—with a word count under 750 words). We will discuss the spectrum of lyricism versus narrative, and all points in-between. We will read a wide variety of flash fiction texts and critical essays on the genre by professional authors. We will create many (six or more) of our own flash fiction drafts, in a wide variety of schools, from realism to surrealism. And we will workshop those drafts, focusing on constructive feedback and considered revision.

Texts:


  • Oh Baby by Kim Chinquee
  • Trout Fishing in America by Richard Brautigan 
  •  Other Electricities By Ander Monson 
  • Murder in the Dark  by Margaret Atwood (PDF)
  • Flash Fiction 72 Very Short Stories by Thomas, Thomas, Hazuka

·        We will also have handouts and online texts.

Contact Professor Lovelace (salovelace@bsu.edu) with any questions. 


ENG 407: Advanced Fiction Writing
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 2:00-2:50 PM

Professor:  Jeff Frawley

This course will offer an intensive study of innovative short fiction.  It will push students as readers and writers, and will facilitate invention, students' honing of craft, and the development of unique fiction-writing styles.  Each week we will read short stories that challenge boundaries when it comes to storytelling technique, subject material, style, and voice.  In addition to studying the mechanics of short fiction, we will carefully consider how the micro (sentences, language choice, details, paragraphing, scene writing) informs and transforms the macro (story shape, theme, use of time, character development).   

The course will feature weekly production of new pages of fiction, critical responses to short stories, regular small-group peer workshops, and occasional full-class workshops.  The semester will culminate with multiple revised stories presented in a portfolio.

Texts:
We will use an anthology featuring a diverse representation of contemporary short fiction, The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction; a collection of essays on fiction-writing craft, The Writer's Notebook; a book of unique writing exercises, The 3 A.M. Epiphany; two collections of linked stories, Jesus' Son by Denis Johnson and Sweet Talk by Stephanie Vaughn; and additional handouts.   


ENG 408: Advanced Poetry Writing
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: Peter Davis

We will read extensively from The Oxford Book of American Poetry and from individual books of poetry. We will write, read and workshop our way through a lot of poems. Students should plan on happily sharing their ideas and poetry, keeping a poetry journal and a reading journal, and coming to class with positive attitude and an open mind. We will all become better artists and, hopefully, people.


ENG 408: Advanced Poetry Writing
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday 5:00-6:15 PM

Professor: TBA


ENG 410: Advanced Screenwriting
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: Matt Mullins

English 410 is an advanced workshop in the theory and practice of screenwriting.  As such, students in this course will write and workshop (i.e., have collectively critiqued) two complete, short screenplays of approximately 10-15 pages each. In addition, they will be asked to complete various screenwriting and script development exercises, view films, and read material related to the craft of screenplay writing.  The bulk of this course will focus on the workshopping and collective critique of student screenplays and the reading and analysis of screenplays and screenplay excerpts considered from the perspective of craft.  Our focus will be on a higher level of discussion related to the practice and analysis of the techniques and processes of screenwriting.  This includes matters of genre, content, structure, style, drafting, and revision, among other things.  One of the major goals of this course (especially Fall Semester sections) is to provide short scripts for production in Ball State’s Cinema Entertainment Immersion program (the CEI).  Therefore, much emphasis will be given to the development of short screenplays suitable for production here at BSU.  This course is intended to build upon the understanding of concepts developed in English 310 while also giving students the opportunity to further apply that understanding to their own screenplays.  To this end, student work will involve the following:

·           Utilizing the essential techniques of cinematic/visual storytelling        
·           Utilizing the major structural elements of screenwriting form
·           Developing original story ideas into scenes and/or complete screenplays
·           Incorporating into their work feedback about format, structure, content, and style from their professor and peers, and revising accordingly
·           Reading, evaluating, and offering constructive criticism (both verbal and written) on the work of their classmates
·           Reading material related to the craft of screenplay writing and/or screenplays written by established screenwriters
·           “Reading” (i.e., analyzing) films to better understand the craft of screenplay writing
·           Developing scripts for potential production via Ball State’s CEI program

REQUIRED TEXTS/MATERIALS: 
·       Story: Substance, Structure, Style, and the Principles of Screenwriting (1st Edition) by Robert McKee
·       The Screenwriter’s Bible (5th Edition) David Trottier
·       Screenwriting software:  All workshop scripts and screenwriting exercises involving scripted scenes must be typed in standard screenplay format.  The best and easiest way to do this is to use screenwriting software.  If you don’t own screenwriting software, there are a number of FREE web-based screenwriting programs available online.  I recommend using Celtx (www.celtx.com.)


ENG 410: Advanced Screenwriting
Section 2: Monday, Wednesday 3:00-4:15 PM

Professor: Matt Mullins

English 410 is an advanced workshop in the theory and practice of screenwriting.  As such, students in this course will write and workshop (i.e., have collectively critiqued) two complete, short screenplays of approximately 10-15 pages each. In addition, they will be asked to complete various screenwriting and script development exercises, view films, and read material related to the craft of screenplay writing.  The bulk of this course will focus on the workshopping and collective critique of student screenplays and the reading and analysis of screenplays and screenplay excerpts considered from the perspective of craft.  Our focus will be on a higher level of discussion related to the practice and analysis of the techniques and processes of screenwriting.  This includes matters of genre, content, structure, style, drafting, and revision, among other things.  One of the major goals of this course (especially Fall Semester sections) is to provide short scripts for production in Ball State’s Cinema Entertainment Immersion program (the CEI).  Therefore, much emphasis will be given to the development of short screenplays suitable for production here at BSU.  This course is intended to build upon the understanding of concepts developed in English 310 while also giving students the opportunity to further apply that understanding to their own screenplays.  To this end, student work will involve the following:

·Utilizing the essential techniques of cinematic/visual storytelling        
·Utilizing the major structural elements of screenwriting form
·Developing original story ideas into scenes and/or complete screenplays 
·Incorporating into their work feedback about format, structure, content, and style from their professor and peers, and revising accordingly
·Reading, evaluating, and offering constructive criticism (both verbal and written) on the work of their classmates
·Reading material related to the craft of screenplay writing and/or screenplays written by   established screenwriters
·“Reading” (i.e., analyzing) films to better understand the craft of screenplay writing
·Developing scripts for potential production via Ball State’s CEI program

REQUIRED TEXTS/MATERIALS: 
· Story: Substance, Structure, Style, and the Principles of Screenwriting (1st Edition) by Robert McKee
·The Screenwriter’s Bible (5th Edition) David Trottier
·Screenwriting software:  All workshop scripts and screenwriting exercises involving scripted scenes must be typed in standard screenplay format.  The best and easiest way to do this is to use screenwriting software.  If you don’t own screenwriting software, there are a number of FREE web-based screenwriting programs available online.  I recommend using Celtx (www.celtx.com.)


ENG 412: Reading Printed Materials in the English Classroom
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM

Professor: Pam Hartman

Contact professor directly for course description.


ENG 414: Young Adult Literature
Section 1: Tuesday 6:30-9:10 PM 

Professor: Susanna Benko

This course will focus on recent young adult literature, representing multiple genres, suitable for young adults.  We will study young adult literature via reading and discussing multiple novels within the genre, as well as reading and discussing multiple supplemental texts (articles and chapters) highlighting historical aspects of the genre and topics within young adult literature related to the novels we read. 

The emphasis is primarily on the reading and analysis of literature, with some attention given to methodology. Questions that guide our work include: 


●      What is the historical development of the genre of young adult literature, and why is it valuable today?  

●      In what ways do various parties (e.g., scholars, authors, publishers) define “young adult”? 

●      What are current debates about the genre and its inclusion in secondary language arts classrooms?

●      How can young adult literature be leveraged towards engaging students (and adults) in critical discussions of issues that matter?



ENG 425: Film Studies
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM
Lab:  TBA        

Professor: Kristin Kotecki

This course surveys the art and culture of cinema as it overlaps with and expands on literary analysis. It emphasizes critical approaches (social, political, aesthetic, technological) to analyzing cinema by situating the formal aspects of films within their cultural context. You will learn to recognize elements of mise en scène, cinematography, montage, and sound and to analyze the implications of variant uses of these formal elements. You will learn to recognize and analyze organizational structures (narrative film, documentary film, and experimental film) and genres. Finally, you will wrestle with questions about the relationship between film form and viewing experience, the role of film as political and social intervention, and the process of forming a “canon” of film. In other words, you will inquire into how films generate meaning and how viewers attribute value to films.


ENG 425: Film Studies
Section 2: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 3:00-3:50 PM
Lab: TBA

Professor: Patrick Collier

This class is an introduction to critical viewing and analysis of films. You will develop a working vocabulary of terms that allows you to analyze, discuss, and write about various aspects of film, including technical matters (types of shots, sound, lighting, narrative structures) and more theoretical issues, including the relationships between films, their audiences, and their cultural contexts. We will explore the fundamentals of how film as an art form communicates meaning, particularly how story and film style combine to convey ideas and move us emotionally. We will raise questions about how films influence us, and how we, as their intended audience, shape them. We will discuss how films reaffirm and (sometimes) challenge our values. You should emerge from this class better prepared to watch films carefully, critically, even skeptically, and to write and talk about your responses to them.


ENG 430: Document Design and Visual Rhetoric
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:00-10:50 AM

Professor: Eva Grouling Snider

In this course, we will explore visual communication, or how we as human beings use visual language to communicate, to persuade, to inform. We will begin by discussing theories of visual communication, including visual perception and thinking, visual culture, and visual rhetoric. We will then move into instruction in the production technologies necessary for document designers, as well as the processes designers and professional writers often follow to design documents. From there, we will examine general principles of document design, including how to examine documents critically through the lens of those principles. Finally, we will focus on more specific principles of visual communication, including principles of color, space, and typography. 

This class is well suited for all students interested in becoming better visual communicators and document designers. It draws on principles common in art, graphic and information design, and professional writing.  

While you will be completing readings and analysis assignments, this course is a production course, meaning the primary focus will be on the documents you design. You will be doing a significant amount of work sketching, wireframing, prototyping, providing feedback, and revising visual documents.  


ENG 436: Theory and Research in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday 3:00-4:15 PM

Professor: Megumi Hamada 

This course introduces theory and research in teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL), by examining linguistic, psychological, sociocultural, and sociopolitical factors in second language learning. The overall objective of this course is to provide a foundational understanding of second language learning for a future teaching career.    


ENG 437: Methods and Materials in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 8:00-10:30 AM

Professor: Lynne Stallings

Contact professor directly for course description.


ENG 444: Senior Seminar
Readings in American Multicultural Literature: What is an American?
Section 1: Wednesday 6:30-9:10 PM

Professor: Pamela Hartman

Students will read and respond to literary works representing multiple cultural perspectives.  The intent is to experience these literatures aesthetically as readers with the class functioning as a text discussion group.  Each student will not only share responses, questions, and problematic issues from their own readings, but also collaborate with the group to explore multiple possible readings for any given texts.  Another central goal for the class is to provide opportunities for each reader to examine his/her own responses and come to some understanding of how the differences in our readings come, in part, from differences in ourselves and differences in cultures, which is construed broadly to refer not only to ethnicity, race, and country of origin, but also (potentially) to religion, neighborhood, family, gender, socioeconomic group, sexual orientation, and all manners of subcultures.  Related to this goal is our ongoing inquiry into how authors construct texts out of their own set of experiences in cultural contexts.  Final research projects will provide opportunities for examining course goals from a chosen topic or perspective.

Possible Texts:
Braided Lives: An Anthology of Multicultural American Writing, Minnesota Humanities Commission (1991)
Unsettling America: An Anthology of Contemporary  Multicultural Poetry, M. M. Gillian & J. Gillian (1994)
Love Medicine, Louise Erdrich (1993)
The Color of Water, James McBride (1996)
Jasmine, Bharati Mukherjee (1989)
American Born Chinese, by Gene Luen Yang (2008 graphic novel)
Other critical texts (provided by instructor)


ENG 444: Senior Seminar 
Narrative, Games, and Literacy
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM 

Professor: Jennifer Grouling

This course will consider the social, rhetorical, and narrative construction of games from a variety of genres (including both board games and video games). We will read books and articles on topics such as the narrative structure of games, identity formation in games, social interactions in gaming, and game design. We will address issues such as the effect of games on literacy as well as how to write for games. Readings will come from diverse areas including cultural studies, rhetorical criticism, education, and narratology. We will both study games and create analog games.

As a senior seminar, you will also develop your own semester long project based on the theme of the course and your particular focus within English studies. You might conduct a rhetorical, literary, or linguistic analysis of a particular game or genre, develop your own game, write a script for a game, or develop a course/unit plan around gaming.


ENG 444: Senior Seminar
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:00-11:50 AM

Professor: Joyce Huff

Subterranean dungeons, secret passageways, flickering lamps, screams, moans, bloody hands, ghosts, and graveyards: these, according to the editors of The Norton Anthology of English Literature, are some of the standard motifs of the Gothic. Although the Gothic form arose in eighteenth-century Britain, its influence was felt long after the first wave of Gothic fiction ended in the 1830’s. Echoes of the Gothic have continually resurfaced in British and American fiction and can still be seen in the horror movies and Stephen King novels that we enjoy today. In this course, we will explore the uses to which Gothic motifs and themes were put in the nineteenth century, and we will chill our blood by reading a selection of Gothic-inspired novels of the period.

Although we may begin with a classic 18th-century example and end by looking at a current manifestation of the genre, we will focus primarily on nineteenth-century novels and short stories. Possible works for study include: Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Wilkie Collins’s The Woman in White, and short stories by Poe, Lovecraft, Hawthorne, Kipling, Stevenson, Hardy, Gaskell, Braddon, Nesbit, Freeman and others. There will also be critical readings on the Gothic, focusing on theorists who tackle the question of why we find certain motifs frightening. Course requirements will include a short paper, a substantial research project, reading quizzes, presentations and participation in discussion, both in class and on-line.


ENG 464: Shakespeare
“Something Wicked This Way Comes[?]”: Supernatural Shakespeare
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM

Professor: Vanessa Rapatz

Ghosts, Spirits, Witches, and Monsters pervade a select number of Shakespeare’s plays. Loosely based on such supernatural themes, this advanced course studies seven plays that span Shakespeare’s career. We will read one comedy, Midsummer Night’s Dream; three tragedies, Macbeth, Hamlet, Richard III (also a history play); and three late romances, Cymbeline, The Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest. Class lectures and discussions will attend to the language and formal conventions of these plays as well as to their stagecraft, their historical context, and their modern reception. We will also be considering modern adaptations of the plays, including the Netflix series House of Cards (originally a British series) that clearly conflates Richard III and Macbeth in its representation of American Politics.


ENG 489: Practicum in Literary Editing and Publishing
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 3:30-4:45 PM

Professor: Silas Hansen

(email schansen@bsu.edu to request permission)

See Instructor for course description

Permission of Instructor is required: please email Silas Hansen at schansen@bsu.edu if you are interested in this class.


ENG 494: Queer Literature/ Queer Theory
Section 1: Tuesday, Thursday 5:00-6:15 PM

Professor: Rai Peterson

Contact professor directly for course description.


ENG 498: Post-Colonial Studies
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:00-9:50 AM

Professor: Molly Ferguson

Ania Loomba defines colonialism as “the conquest and control of other people’s land and goods”. Postcolonial Studies includes literature from former colonies around the world, which often unpacks the “baggage” of forging a national and cultural identity amidst a legacy of imperialism and violence. Much of postcolonial literature is concerned with how to tell one's story from a marginalized position. The texts we will read each provide a specific cultural perspective and often speak back to Western conventions, yet they evoke universal aspects of the human condition such as memory, identity, and loss.

We will read novels, short stories, plays, and a graphic novel by authors including: Kamala Markandaya, Jamaica Kincaid, Edwidge Danticat, Conor McPherson and Gabriel Ba. If you are compelled by the ways people tell stories to preserve their culture and release traumatic experiences, consider taking this course.


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