Different semesters bring different class offerings.  Course titles link to expanded descriptions on this page that are written by faculty and more detailed than those in the Undergraduate Catalog.  General descriptions of all English courses are in the Undergraduate Catalog.

 

 

SPRING 2018 UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

ENG 150: Introduction to Secondary English Education
ENG 205: World Literature
ENG 206: Reading Literature
ENG 210: Intro to Rhetoric and Writing
ENG 213: Intro to Digital Literacies
ENG 214: Intro to Literature and Gender
ENG 216: Intro to American Ethnic Literature
ENG 220: Language and Society
ENG 230: Reading and Writing about Literature
ENG 231: Professional Writing
ENG 250: American Literature 2: 1860 to the Present
ENG 260: British Literature 1: The Beginning to 1780
ENG 280: British Literature 2: 1780 to the Present
ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing
ENG 306: Creative Nonfiction Writing
ENG 307: Fiction Writing
ENG 308: Poetry Writing
ENG 310: Screenwriting
ENG 320: Intro to Linguistic Science
ENG 321: English Linguistics
ENG 328: Language and Gender
ENG 329: Editing and Style
ENG 334: English Linguistics for Educators
ENG 345: Early American Literature
ENG 350: Teaching Writing in Secondary Schools
ENG 366: British Literature 1890-1930
ENG 389: Practicum in Peer Tutoring in Writing
ENG 395: Teaching Literature and Language in Secondary Schools
ENG 400: Special Topics in English:  Transgender Rhetorics
ENG 400: Special Topics in English:  Book Arts Collaborative
ENG 405: Special Topics in Creative Writing
ENG 406: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing
ENG 407: Advanced Fiction Writing
ENG 408: Advanced Poetry Writing
ENG 409: Creative Writing in the Community
ENG 410: Advanced Screenwriting
ENG 412: Reading in the Secondary English Classroom
ENG 414: Young Adult Literature
ENG 425: Film Studies
ENG 431: Rhetoric, Writing, and Emerging Media
ENG 435: Issues in Rhetoric and Writing
ENG 444: Senior Seminar
ENG 457: Practicum in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages - Teaching Majors Only
ENG 457A: Practicum in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages - TESOL Minors Only
ENG 489: Practicum in Literary Editing and Publishing - The Broken Plate
ENG 491: Literature of African-American Traditions
ENG 494: Queer Lit and Queer Theory


 

ENG 150: Introduction to Secondary English Education
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-2:50 PM

Professor: Darolyn “Lyn” Jones

Content includes constructing an informed vision of English and English teaching, developing basic skills for teaching English, and beginning preparation for teacher licensure.



ENG 205: World Literature
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 11:00-11:50 AM

Professor: Molly Ferguson

This class will introduce you to a diverse body of literature from several former British and French colonies of Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America and Asia. We will explore the experience of colonization—and the ensuing struggles to construct individual, national, and transnational post-colonial identities. Along with addressing the questions of language, history, exile, migration, gender, and race so central to the developing world, we will discuss the continuing use of the term “post-colonial”. One of the themes we will return to often will be the concept of maps, and what maps reveal and conceal about global power networks.

 

 

ENG 206: Reading Literature
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 12:00-12:50 PM

Professor: Allison Layfield

English 206 introduces students to the nature of reading for multiple meanings and interpretations of texts. We will read contemporary novels concerned with how people create and interact in a “community.” How do we form communities? Who is left out? How does a community survive? What is the relationship between the individual and the community?

 

 

ENG 206: Reading Literature
Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 11:00-12:15 PM

Professor: Brent Blackwell

English 206 is an introduction to critical reading and writing about literature.  This course will examine central twentieth century texts relating to (directly and indirectly) the Holocaust, including novels, poetry, film, autobiography, and drama.  We will engage the central issue of how we in the West process this defining moment in our culture through literature, in particular how we construct meaning from an event that destroyed it.  We will also consider a variety of literary theories of reading as different avenues into our understanding of these texts.



ENG 206: Reading Literature
Section 3: Tuesday and Thursday 3:30-4:30 PM

Professor: Matt Hartman

English 206 introduces students to interpreting and writing critically about literature.  What do we do when we interpret a text?  Are some interpretations better than others? How can we tell?  We will explore these questions by considering how form, context, and perspective affect meaning in a variety of stories, poems, novels, plays, and films. More specifically, we will examine the connection between literature and emotion.  How do texts make us feel?  How can we sympathize with fictional characters?  Does reading literature, as some claim, make us more empathetic? Assignments will include informal responses, two essays, quizzes, and a final exam.

 

 

ENG 210: Intro to Rhetoric and Writing
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 6:30-7:45 PM

Professor: TBA



 

ENG 213: Intro to Digital Literacies
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 11:00-12:15 PM

Professor: TBA

 



ENG 213: Intro to Digital Literacies
Section 2: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 3:00-3:50 PM

Professor: TBA

 

 

 

ENG 213: Intro to Digital Literacies
Section 3: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 11:00-11:50 AM

Professor: Kat Greene

It’s a digital world and we are just livin’ in it… Or are we? How do the digital texts we interact with shape our understanding of the world, and likewise, how does our understanding of the world shape our creation of digital texts? Intro to Digital Literacies asks students to interrogate literacy at its functional, rhetorical, and critical levels while engaging with/in digital technologies. Through questioning, analyzing, and creating digital texts, students will expand and demonstrate their knowledge in this area to specific contexts and purposes in their everyday lives.

 

 

 

ENG 214: Intro to Literature and Gender
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: Andrea Wolfe

In this course, students will take up questions that modern-day readers may have about the women depicted in traditional and canonical literature as unintelligent, dependent, passive, oversexed, evil, mentally ill, and even non-existent. Did Gertrude really love the elder Hamlet, for instance, despite her quick marriage to Claudius after her first husband’s death? What was Bertha like before she is chained up in the attic of Mr. Rochester’s estate for ten years? And where is Mammy’s own daughter as she dotes on the young belle, Scarlett O’Hara, throughout Scarlett’s childhood? The course will ask students to read original classic texts alongside contemporary literary works that reveal the previously unwritten thoughts, feelings, and actions of the stories’ female characters. Paired readings will likely include William Shakespeare’s Hamlet and John Updike’s Gertrude and Claudius, Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre and Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea, and Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind and Alice Randall’s The Wind Done Gone. Each student will compose a short essay on one of the texts covered in the class, a research-driven creative piece reimagining a scene from one of the required novels, and a final examination. This course is designed for students who are not majoring or minoring in English; all are welcome!

 

 

ENG 216: Intro to American Ethnic Literature
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 11:00-11:50 AM

Professor: Allison Layfield

This class is designed to introduce you to the cultural, historical and literary influences that shape contemporary Asian American literature.  The term “Asian American” applies to a variety of people, cultures and histories within the United States. In this course we will focus on how these diverse histories and literary traditions inspire contemporary Asian American writers to challenge the boundaries of genre and our expectations for fiction. Students in this course will explore a wide range of stories in fiction genres such as mystery, fantasy, graphic novels, realist, and historical fictions.

 

 

 

ENG 220: Language and Society
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 9:00-9:50 AM

Professor: Mai Kuha

You speak the way you do because of who you are and where you are from. You also adjust the way you speak according to the situation. In this course, we will discuss the nature of this language variation and how its interaction with social attitudes affects our lives.

Our look at the nature of language variation will include the main features of dialects of English in the U.S. (regional dialects and African American English) a brief look at how language and gender connect the main facts about the presence of languages other than English in the U.S. how language change results in language variation. When looking at the impact of the interaction between language variation and social attitudes, we will consider issues such as how people are judged because of the way they speak, how this affects linguistic minorities in the educational system, and how language attitudes find their way into legislation.

 

 

ENG 220: Language and Society
Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM

Professor: Mai Kuha

You speak the way you do because of who you are and where you are from. You also adjust the way you speak according to the situation. In this course, we will discuss the nature of this language variation and how its interaction with social attitudes affects our lives.

Our look at the nature of language variation will include the main features of dialects of English in the U.S. (regional dialects and African American English) a brief look at how language and gender connect the main facts about the presence of languages other than English in the U.S. how language change results in language variation. When looking at the impact of the interaction between language variation and social attitudes, we will consider issues such as how people are judged because of the way they speak, how this affects linguistic minorities in the educational system, and how language attitudes find their way into legislation.

 

ENG 230: Reading and Writing about Literature
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 9:00-9:50 AM

Professor: Jesse Sopher



ENG 230: Reading and Writing about Literature
Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 3:30-4:45 PM

Professor:  Joyce Huff

What are your assumptions when pick up a work of literature? What questions do you ask of it? What expectations do you have? And how do those questions and expectations affect what you get out of it?

In ENG 230, we will explore these questions and learn more about the wide variety of contexts and frameworks available for making meaning from literary texts. A reader approaching one of Aesop’s fables, for example, might be interested in the moral of the tale, but he or she might also be interested in what codes of ethics and philosophies underlie these morals or how the ancient Greeks perceived and represented animals (often the protagonists of these fables) or how fables differ from other types of narrative or any number of other questions. Which questions you ask of a text determine which methodologies you use to find answers as well as the kinds of conclusions you reach.

 

In this course, you will become familiar with different theories of how literature functions as well as different research methods and types of literary conversations. You will practice working with these in order to gain the skill and comfort-level needed to employ them in your own scholarly work. You will also learn effective ways of presenting your own written arguments about literature. Finally, you will be given the opportunity to examine your own basic assumptions about texts, authors and readers and to position your own scholarship within the world of contemporary literary studies.

 

 

 

ENG 230: Reading and Writing about Literature
Section 3: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM

Professor: Debbie Mix

This course is designed to provide an introduction to a range of strategies (close reading, theoretical frameworks, and literary research) to reading, discussing, and writing about a variety of literary genres (poetry, fiction, drama, and memoir).  To that end, the course readings, classroom activities, and writing assignments will give you plenty of practice in all those areas.  We’ll begin by working closely with poetry, learning the vocabulary of the field and honing our observational and analytical skills. We’ll proceed to drama, with a focus on how various cultural contexts shape our interpretation of the text. Then it’s on to fiction and an explicit engagement with literary theory.  As you work on a final research project for the course, we’ll also be reading a graphic (as in illustrated) memoir and thinking about the ways that visual and verbal rhetorics interact.  We’ll be doing a lot of reading and even more writing this semester; our goal is to make you a skillful reader, thoughtful discussant, and confident writer.

 

 

ENG 231: Professional Writing
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 11:00-12:15 PM

Professor: Laura Romano

In this course, we will explore professional writing: what it means to write for and with others, to design and create content for complex work environments, and to collaborate on primary research. In particular, we will be focusing on people acting with technology via their discursive activities. How do people use technology to bond, to persuade, to inform? At the end of the course, you will be able to identify and explain some of the key rhetorical and social issues related to people acting with technology in professional writing scenarios. ENG 231 will immerse you in the concepts and practices of qualitative field research, project management, visual rhetoric and document design, and professionalism. You will be expected to produce high-quality deliverables grounded in real-world situations. Please contact Dr. Romano (ljromano@bsu.edu) with any questions.



ENG 231: Professional Writing
Section 2: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 12:00-12:50 PM

Professor: Brianna Mauk

"Professional Writing (ENG 231) will first work through a detailed definition and analysis of professional/technical writing, followed by researching the tenets of theory, genre, and practice encompassed by such writing. Finally, ENG 231 will practice the creation and sharing of deliverables with strategies tailored to audience/client and rhetorical context."

 

 

ENG 250: American Literature 2: 1860 to the Present
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM

Professor: Debbie Mix

Questions about national identity, the role of race, class, gender, and sexuality in creating American identity, the responsibilities of America in the world, the place of history in determining the future—have long occupied American writers.  Thus, these questions will become our guiding questions in investigating American literature from 1860 to the present. Additionally, this course is designed to help you fit individual texts into a cultural, political, and historical framework.  Finally, this course will seek to provide you with a literary vocabulary—familiarity with the characteristics of specific movements; facility with reading, writing about, and discussing literature; and a framework for identifying your own tastes as a literary critic.  All our readings and all assignments are dedicated to this goal.  

 

 

 

ENG 260: British Literature 1: The Beginning to 1780
Section 1: Monday and Wednesday 3:00-4:15 PM

Professor: Vanessa Rapatz

Our focus in this course will be literature written in English before 1780. We will look at a wide range of texts by various authors as we explore the constantly changing English language and the emergence of key literary genres. As we engage with the language and form of these texts, we will also explore the way the authors respond to changing circumstances and new ideas. We will consider, for example, the effects of technology such as the printing press, the impact of Bible translation and nationalism on the rising prestige of English, and expanding forms of self- expression. While rooted in Great Britain, this course will consider England's relationship to other traditions at home and abroad.  We will pay particular attention to Colonial America as a new site of English literary production and consumption in the period.  As you explore the multiple aspects of these texts, you will build your skills as readers of poetry, drama, and prose; as writers; and as researchers.



ENG 280: British Literature 2: 1780 to the Present
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: Joyce Huff

In this class, we will examine some of the major historical, philosophical and artistic contexts in which British writers have been working for the past two hundred years. How did people use literature to understand and cope with major changes like the movement for women’s rights, rapid industrialization, the rise and fall of the British empire, new ways of understanding and discussing gender and sexuality, two world wars, waves of immigration, and new forms of print and media that demanded new ways of expressing oneself? How did their works engage with and impact their society? What literary theories are most useful in understanding their works? We will address these questions by reading a variety of works of fiction in addition to poetry, plays and essays along with contextual sources. In particular, we will think about the changing expectations of readers over the past two hundred or so years and how writers both met and challenged those expectations. Possible assignments include two essays, exams, quizzes, and participation both in class and online.

 

 

ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 9:00-9:50 AM

Professor: TBA

Section 2: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 10:00-10:50 AM

Section 3: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 11:00-11:50 AM

Section 4: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 1:00-1:50 PM

Professor: Michael Begnal

Introduction to the craft, terminology, and techniques of multiple genres, including fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Creative writing is more than just “making stuff up”—it requires making choices, taking risks, and rethinking those choices and risks through the process of revision. This course will introduce students to the basics of crafting creative work in three genres: poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Students are expected to write and revise at least four poems, one short story, and one non-fiction piece for their final grade. We will focus on language, image, structure, dialogue, character, and setting, among other fundamentals. Because being a good writer requires that you also be a good reader, we will also devote considerable time to reading and discussing published work. Along with completing various short writing assignments, students will produce original writing in each of the three genres, as well as revisions. Our workshops give you an audience for your poems and stories. After hearing several responses, you can better gauge what kind of revisions to make. Be prepared to write as often as possible, whether in or out of class. Attendance, participation, and engagement are mandatory. No prior writing experience is necessary; all you need is a desire to write. This course counts as a Writing-Intensive Course.

Section 5: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 2:00-2:50 PM

Professor: Emily Scalzo

English 285 offers an introduction to the art and craft of writing poetry and prose that’s worth reading. The course  will  focus  on  development  of  writing  craft,  obtainment  of  a  critical/literary  vocabulary,  and  a  reading, examination,  and  discussion  of  established  authors.  As  students  and  writers,  you  will  read  and  analyze  high quality  published  work,  write  and  revise  your  own  pieces,  and  read  and  discuss  the  work  of  your  classmates. Time  permitting,  I  also  hope  to  introduce  you  to  the  world  of  literary  journals  and  publishing  as  well. You will produce a substantial body of your own writing, culminating in a final portfolio.  This course does not require you to be an experienced and/or gifted creative writer; it does require you to be willing to read, analyze, and do your best on your own work. This is a reading and writing intensive course.

Section 6: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 3:00-3:50 PM

Professor: Kathryn Gardiner

This course will familiarize students with the art and techniques of multiple forms of creative writing; develop and strengthen introspection and self-editing methods; and nurture storytelling and revision skills with the goal of completing a portfolio of poetry, non-fiction, and fiction selections by the end of the semester. There will be lots of reading and writing. No experience needed.

Section 8: Tuesday and Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM

Professor: Peter Davis

This class in an introduction to creative writing focusing primarily on poetry, fiction and creative non-fiction. Students will read a lot of established authors and spend time discussing the work. Students will also write a lot, both in and out of class.

Ideally, students leave the class better readers and writers, but also better at appreciating all forms of art.

Section 9: Tuesday and Thursday 11:00-12:15 PM

Section 11: Tuesday and Thursday 3:30-4:45 PM

Professor: Peter Bethanis

The course will consist of reading, writing, and evaluating creative writing in a myriad of categories and contexts.  The course will explore creative writing as a craft, process, and art form.  The main goal is to allow students to trigger subjects and projects that evolve over time with revision into polished pieces.  There will be weekly lectures to evaluate readings in fiction, poetry and other genres, and weekly workshops to evaluate students’ creative writing.  Literary terms such as tone, diction, image, and setting will be used to develop the writing.  Instruction in critical theory and literary schools will be covered.  Group collaboration will be an integral part of evaluating texts and student writing.  

Section 10: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: Todd McKinney

As an introduction to Creative Writing, this class will provide the students with the opportunity to study the craft of writing fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. In order to develop a thorough understanding of the power of imaginative writing, we will explore the possibilities of the three genres by reading and discussing a number of stories, poems, and essays while also drafting our own pieces. We will also take time to discuss and practice various approaches to revision. In short, this class asks the students to write a lot and to read a lot and write some more—the best way to become a better writer.

Assignments for the class will include drafts, workshop critiques, a daily journal, reading responses and/or quizzes, as well as a final revised project. These assignments and exercises will challenge students to think creatively and critically to better understand how we make/shape/bend/warp meaning out of language and experience as we continue exploring what it means to be alive on earth, with Imaginative Writing as our primary transportation device.

Texts will include Janet Burroway’s Imaginative Writing and Natalie Goldberg’s Writing Down the Bones.

Section 7: Monday and Wednesday 5:00-6:15 PM

Section 12: Tuesday and Thursday 5:00-6:15 PM

Section 13: Tuesday and Thursday 6:30-7:45 PM

Professor: Brian Morrison

English 285 is an introduction to writing poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. The course will focus on development of writing craft, obtainment of a critical/literary vocabulary, and a reading, examination, and discussion of established authors. This class will be centered in active learning. You will read a great amount of excellent material; you will write a great amount, and you will strive to make it excellent. I will attempt to spark and develop your creativity. To that end, you will create your own original poems, stories, and essays.

 

 

 

ENG 306: Creative Nonfiction Writing
Section 1: Monday and Wednesday 5:00-6:15 PM

Professor:  Jill Christman (jcchristman@bsu.edu)

In this creative nonfiction writing class we will focus on the techniques and art of the personal essay to explore how we think and why. Using our own memories, experiences, & perceptions as the lenses through which we record the world, we’ll prime our writing juices by crafting short creative responses to specific reading-inspired prompts, move on to a longer essay rooted in personal experience, and as the term progresses we’ll expand our scope to write about things beyond the self—other people, other objects, other places, other ways of being in the world. We’ll work on the nuts-and-bolts of the writing (research strategies, structure, point of view, storytelling, time-handling, language) as we tackle the big questions facing us:  What do I want to write about and why? What about memory and forgetting? What shape might best serve this essay? What does it mean to say something true?

Class time will be divided between discussions of published works, writing exercises, student-led discussions of Brevity essays, writer visits, and small-group workshops of student writing. Texts: Tell It Slant (eds. Brenda Miller & Suzanne Paolo) & The Touchstone Anthology of Creative Nonfiction (eds. Michael Martone & Lex Williford).

 

 

ENG 306: Creative Nonfiction Writing
Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 11:00-12:15 PM

Professor: Todd McKinney

What is Creative Nonfiction? Are there different types of Creative Nonfiction? How is Creative Nonfiction different than journalism? What is a fact? Any different than truth? What is truth? A matter of perspective? And what is Perspective anyway? Is that the same as a narrator? How is a Creative Nonfiction narrator different than a fiction narrator? Or a poet? Who tells the truth? How does one put the truth into words that are both artful and honest?

These are just a few of the questions we will take up this semester in this introduction to the literary genre of Creative Nonfiction, which will provide the student with the opportunity to practice writing Creative Nonfiction and to further explore its possibilities by reading and discussing a number of essays. In short, this class asks the student to write and read a lot. Furthermore, the class will introduce the student to the subgenres of Creative Nonfiction and to the key concepts and terms needed to be a part of the ongoing conversation that is Creative Nonfiction. The assignments and exercises will challenge students to think critically and creatively to better understand how we make meaning out of language and experience so we can present it to a reader to continue the discussion of what it means to be alive on earth and to share our true stories with others.

Course assignments will include a journal, drafts, workshop responses, quizzes and/or reading responses, and a portfolio.

 

 

ENG 307: Fiction Writing
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 10:00-10:50 AM

Professor: Jeff Frawley

This class will offer an exploration of the craft and art of the short story, focusing on both the nuts-and-bolts construction of stories and the habits and practices necessary to dream up, design, and draft successful fiction.  We’ll read and discuss a number of short stories as part of the process, using these readings to develop an understanding of key concepts and terms.  Throughout the semester, writing exercises and reflective writing will be used to help students shape a sense of who they are as fiction writers, and what styles and approaches they wish to incorporate into their writing.  The class will also include lots of sharing and discussing of students’ own work.     

In addition to handouts of many published short stories, we’ll read and discuss Wonderbook by Jeff Vandermeer, an illustrated guidebook to writing fiction.

 

 

ENG 307: Fiction Writing
Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 09:30-10:45 AM

Professor: Sean Lovelace

Writing is an art and craft, creative inspiration blended with very hard work. In this class, we will focus on the work—reading, writing, discussing fiction, both professional examples, and our own personal writing. The goal is to develop technical ability and understanding of craft and technique; and to define and cultivate a personal aesthetic—or, at least, do some serious thinking about it. A portion of the class will concentrate on the development of a critical vocabulary, in-class writing exercises, and the discussion of pieces of short fiction. Obviously, fiction is a massive “world,” and we will analyze the usual and expected aspects: plot, setting, character, and so on. I would like to focus on objects in fiction (as in what is there and why?), figurative language (metaphors, similes, personification, etc.), conflict (locating it and why it’s important), and mood, or atmosphere. Be sure to think about these specific aspects with every fiction piece we read.

We will also focus on a particular structure in this class: THE QUEST. You will be expected to write a complete quest narrative.

Another portion of the class will be dedicated to workshop, or peer review, of your own original fiction. Every student is expected to thoroughly read their peers’ work, and to give thoughtful and respectful feedback. Although focusing on workshopping student stories at this time, we will continue with exercises and our discussions of published fiction as well.

Contact Professor Lovelace (salovelace@bsu.edu) with any questions.

 

ENG 307: Fiction Writing
Section 3: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 2:00-2:50 PM

Professor: Jeff Frawley

This class will offer an exploration of the craft and art of the short story, focusing on both the nuts-and-bolts construction of stories and the habits and practices necessary to dream up, design, and draft successful fiction.  We’ll read and discuss a number of short stories as part of the process, using these readings to develop an understanding of key concepts and terms.  Throughout the semester, writing exercises and reflective writing will be used to help students shape a sense of who they are as fiction writers, and what styles and approaches they wish to incorporate into their writing.  The class will also include lots of sharing and discussing of students’ own work.     

In addition to handouts of many published short stories, we’ll read and discuss Wonderbook by Jeff Vandermeer, an illustrated guidebook to writing fiction.

 

 

 

ENG 308: Poetry Writing
Section 1: Monday and Wednesday 3:00-4:15 PM

Professor: Katy Didden

What is poetry?  In this class, we will search for the answer to this question by reading great works of poetry, experimenting with many approaches to writing poems. This workshop is designed to provide guidance, feedback, and ideas to aid you in your current writing process. By the end of this course, you will gain a repertoire of new rhythms, a storehouse of rhymes, and a facility with forms and structures.  You will learn tools for starting poems, tools for shaping poems, and tools for stealing the best writing tricks from other writers.  You will also encounter poems that stir the blood, and learn lines you will remember for the rest of your life.  We will approach the writing process from three different angles: first we will read, study, and discuss the work of established and emerging poets with great attention, gathering tools for our own work; second, we will experiment with poetic forms and traditions, from sonnets to spoken word, so that we understand poetry’s traditions and evolutions; third, we will learn from each other how to build a community of writers, and what it means to read, critique, encourage, and perform poetry. Students will write at least six poem drafts, many exercises, and response papers; the class will culminate with a final portfolio assignment and a reading.

 

 

ENG 308: Poetry Writing
Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM

Professor: Peter Davis

This class focuses on reading and writing poetry. Students will write and read a lot. This class is also a workshop, meaning students will share their own work and critique the work of their classmates. By the end of the semester students will create a chapbook of their own work. Ideally, students leave the class better readers and writers, but also better at appreciating all forms of art.

 

ENG 310: Screenwriting
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM

Professor: Rani Crowe

English 310 is an introductory course focusing on short form screenwriting with an emphasis on visual and experiential dramatic writing that can be translated from page to screen. Students will complete writing exercises to build muscles in Visual Storytelling, Screenplay Format, Character and World Development, Genre, and Structure. Additionally, students will watch various styles of short films and media, read screenplays and other craft related readings. Students will build skills in analysis and critical response through group workshops. The course will culminate in a final 10-15 page screenplay that we will take through a process of planning, workshopping, and revision.

 

 

ENG 310: Screenwriting
Section 2: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 9:00-9:50 AM
Section 3: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 1:00-1:50 PM
Section 4: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 11:00-11:50 AM

Professor: Kathryn Gardiner

This course will introduce students to screenwriting for film, television, or new media, emphasizing the elements of visual storytelling with practice in writing, critique, and media analysis. Through assignments, in-class exercises and lecture, we will develop skills in visual storytelling, learn basic terminology and techniques of the screenwriter’s craft, practice methods of workshop and peer critique, exercise the vocabulary necessary to discuss narrative and plots with producers, and expand our understanding of media representation and further develop the vocabulary to discuss these topics.

 

 

 

ENG 320: Intro to Linguistic Science
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: Guilherme D. Garcia

There are more than 7,000 natural languages in the world. All these languages may look and sound different on the surface, but their fundamental building blocks are much more similar than people think. This course explores the components of such building blocks, namely, sound, structure, and meaning. We will investigate how sounds are produced and perceived by speakers of different languages, as well as how words and sentences are formed. We will also explore how languages are acquired by children and adults who study foreign languages. Above all, ENG 320 is about the scientific study of human language. We will therefore spend time thinking about the kinds of questions we need to ask to better understand language, and how we can empirically explore such questions to find adequate and satisfying answers.

 

 

ENG 321: English Linguistics
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM

Professor: Guilherme D. Garcia

The main goal of this course is to investigate the fundamental grammatical structures and relations that govern phrases and sentences in English. We will investigate different linguistic patterns and think about what generalizations can be made from such patterns. As a result, we will also discuss the rationale behind common syntactic constructions in English. In other words, this course will enable students to critically think about how English grammar works.

 

 

ENG 328: Language and Gender
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 3:00-3:50 PM

Professor: Mai Kuha

In this course, we investigate in detail how language and gender are related. How do we use linguistic resources in constructing our gender identities and in perceiving others in gendered terms?

-Language about people as gendered beings

-We can see how language reflects gender, and also constructs it, in labels and descriptions applied to people (for example, address terms and the linguistic representation of gender roles in pop culture).

-Language by people as gendered beings

-After looking at how gendered identities are constructed, we will focus on some aspects of conversational style, and examine how people use language for purposes such as claiming authority or solidarity in various contexts, such as the workplace and the family.

Readings will consist of articles and chapters on electronic reserve. Course requirements will include observing how language and gender interact in various arenas.



ENG 329: Editing and Style
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 1:00-1:50 PM

Professor: Paul Ranieri

Introduction to approaches to editing, style, and writing conventions; intensive practice to editing, collaborative writing, and critique appropriate for students in professional writing or other writing intensive majors or careers.  More specifically, ENG 329 introduces students to (1) professional copy-editing techniques, conventions, and terms; (2) rhetorical and historical approaches to style, and (3) conventions of grammar, usage, mechanics in academic and professional style guides and in various media.  Gives students intensive practice in collaborative writing, editing, and critique.

 

 

ENG 334: English Linguistics for Educators
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 11:00-11:50 AM

Professor: Laila Aghai

An introduction for ESL teachers to fundamentals of linguistics, with special attention to the structure and use of English and how its features compare to those of other languages frequently spoken by ESL learners. This includes sound systems, vocabulary, grammar, differences between oral and written language use, and the intersection of language and culture.

 

 

ENG 345: Early American Literature
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: Ben Bascom

There are a lot of seductive narratives circulating in our present moment about pre-1800 North America: that Christopher Columbus “discovered” the continent; that the Pilgrims who left Europe in the 1620s paved the way for the 1776 colonial revolt against Britain; and that the United States as an early nation had a coherent identity, one that we would ostensibly recognize today. In this course, we will examine how those myths were produced and why they have maintained such a seductive allure to the present day. We will draw upon the disparate cultural materials understood as “early American literature,” which covers over three centuries and includes sermons, diaries, poems, political tracts, novels, and many more genres. These materials were written and read by Puritan settlers, Native American leaders, emancipated African slaves, colonial agitators, and proto-feminist writers. We will conclude the semester by examining an early national U.S. novel that draws upon the seduction plot in ways that curiously presage our budding critique of the seductive narratives surrounding early America.

 

 

ENG 350: Teaching Writing in Secondary Schools
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: Darolyn “Lyn’ Jones

Concentrates on materials, methods, and resources used in teaching composition and the use of performance assessments in the English/language arts classroom. Additional focus on technology and multimedia in practice, introduction to pedagogical practices and curriculum development. Required of teaching majors; may not be applied toward other department programs

Prerequisite: Must have completed Decision Point 2

 

 

ENG 366: British Literature 1890-1930
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 2:00-2:50 PM

Professor: Pat Collier, pccollier@bsu.edu

British Modernism and the “Fall of Civilization”

Do you ever get the feeling that everything’s going to hell? A lot of people writing in England and Ireland in the early 20th century had that feeling at one time or another. And that’s no surprise: World War I decimated a generation of Europeans and convinced others that the promises of western civilization had been lies. An Irish revolution that started with utopian dreams devolved into civil war. Less than twenty years later, fascism took hold on the continent and the inevitability of another world war became apparent. This cultural ferment produced a number of legacies that remain important today: they include a questioning of the inevitability of progress, a newly revitalized set of debates about capitalism, ideology, and state power, and some of the most admired poetry and fiction of the century.

In this class, we will examine cultural debates about civilization, progress, and national belonging by immersing in primary documents of the period, chief among them novels, poems, and non-fiction by writers with a stake in the purpose and future of literature. Assignments will include a class wiki that defines and contextualizes key words, figures, movements, and trends along with shorter papers and blog posts. We will read in magazines and periodicals of the period and study works by Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, W. B. Yeats, W. H. Auden, George Orwell, Elizabeth Bowen, and others.

 

 

 

ENG 389: Practicum in Peer Tutoring in Writing
Section 1:  Tuesday and Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM

Professor: TBA



 

ENG 395: Teaching Literature and Language in Secondary Schools
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 3:30-4:45 PM

Professor: Jeff Spanke

English 395 explores various strategies and issues concerned in teaching language, literature, and multimodal literacy in the secondary English-language arts classroom. Themes of expertise, engagement, disposition, and context are all key pieces in your program of study.  In addition, this course focuses developing an understanding of and applying InTASC standard 1-9.  

 

 

 

ENG 400: Special Topics in English:  Transgender Rhetorics
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM

Professor: G Patterson

This course will focus on contemporary discussions of transgender issues in the context of the United States. We will begin the course by examining concepts of social justice and privilege—focusing specifically on cisgender privilege. From there we will read works that historicize trans issues. During the latter part of the semester, we will examine how people talk about trans issues in the mainstream public, and we will focus on how various trans activist groups have tried to rally support for gender justice. We will also read articles that analyze the difficulties/limits of certain rhetorical moves within these groups. Students will use these readings and discussions to complete a series of writing assignments related to the course.

The key questions we will ask during the semester are as follows:

-How are transgender people represented, and not represented, in various publics?

-What are some of the key difficulties in framing public arguments for gender justice? How have certain trans organizations responded to these challenges?

-Who determines what counts as a transgender issue?

-How are transgender issues always already inter-animated with discussions about race, ethnicity, class, citizenship, ability, gender, gender performance, and sexuality?

 

 

 

ENG 400: Special Topics in English:  Book Arts Collaborative
Section 4: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 2:00-2:50 PM

Professor: Rai Peterson

You probably own a lot of books.  You probably have at least one within five feet of you now. There may be a book you love, one you hate, and one you wish you’d read but haven’t.  But, do you know how books are made?  Where paper comes from historically?  Why Gutenberg’s invention of moveable type was world-changing?  Why his invention was a perfect storm of mistakes and happenstance?

If you want to fully understand the journey the book has taken to get to your shelf and your hand, Book Arts Collaborative offers the perfect combination of historical information and hands-on learning.

When you “take a book apart,” are you confined to criticism?  Can you name the parts of a book with confidence?  Could you print a book using moveable type?  Could you make one with paper and thread? Do you wish you could?

Book Arts Collaborative is an immersive experience where students LEARN to sew books and print with letterpress type and presses, they PRACTICE teaching in community workshops that they are eventually invited to TEACH.  They SPEAK at Interrobang, our April book arts festival.  Students MANAGE and run our BUSINESS.

Do you worry about how you’ll present yourself in a job interview?  Do you wonder if you’re ready to work for a boss, or (gulp) be a boss?  Professionalize your skills at Book Arts Collaborative.  Work in teams.  Interact with retailers.  Meet the public, and leave people happier, more energized, better-informed, and interested than you found them.

At Book Arts Collaborative we make hand-sewn books and print ephemera.  We sell those items.  We teach community workshops.  We publish a book.  We put on a regional conference.  Come, be part of the revitalization of DWNTWN Muncie.

Email Dr. Rai Peterson for more information: Rai@bsu.edu

 

 

ENG 405: Special Topics in Creative Writing
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM

Professor: Angela Jackson-Brown

In this advanced special topics creative writing class, you will be exploring the genres of fiction and the techniques needed for conducting historical research to enhance your storytelling skills. We will spend our time at the beginning of the semester reading critical essays and fiction and seeing how selected authors were able to incorporate historical research into their writing and still maintain the creativity necessary to make the works interesting and engaging and true to the real people and/or real histories they wrote about. Then, you will create fictional works of your own that illustrate your ability to pin down the mannerisms, costumes, conditions, vernacular and so on from a particular time and place in history in order to make your works realistic. You will also write several critical essays about the reading assignments and you will have weekly historical research assignments that will help prepare you for your own creative writing projects.

 

 

ENG 405: Special Topics in Creative Writing
Topic:  Words Meet World: Creative Writing and the Environment

Section 2: Monday and Wednesday 5:00-6:15 PM

Professor: Katy Didden

For this class, we will read and write our way into wildernesses, exploring the possibilities of writing with, about, and around the environment. In the first half of this course, we will study practical strategies for how to use description and precise observation as tools to create an effective sense of place and atmosphere in our work. We will begin with readings and writing exercises that will help us write what we know, and write in order to know, our local region, and we will also experiment with what it means to translate this knowledge to write what we don’t know (how do writers create fictional worlds?). In the second half of the course, we will consider what happens when our environment is not just the setting, but the subject of our work. We will explore questions like: How are we, as humans, connected to the environment? What is organic form, and what is the relationship between the shapes of nature (valley, gyre, plain, bower, ridge, abrupt edge) and literary form? What does it mean to be writers in the age of global warming, and in light of our current environmental crises? We will practice a range of writing techniques, including collaborative authorship, multi-media work, and documentary forms. Course requirements will include quizzes, reading responses, genre-specific writing exercises, and workshop critiques. The course will culminate in an individual, final project that is open genre and also more self-directed: each student will choose an environmental creature or feature to research (i.e. Squirrel, Desert, Forest, Tundra, Clouds, Grasslands), compile an “idea portfolio,” then use that research to inform a longer piece of writing (either an essay, a short story, or a series of poems).

 

 

 

ENG 406: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing
Section 1: Monday and Wednesday 3:00-4:15 PM

Professor: Jill Christman (jcchristman@bsu.edu)

Inspired by the insightful, brick-by-brick essay about essays co-written by Ana Maria Spagna and Steve Harvey (“Parts of the Essay,” Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Studies), this advanced creative nonfiction class will focus on the art of transforming lived experience and the observable world into essays. Using our own lives and perceptive faculties as the lens through which we record the world, we’ll start by writing our memories—looking inward to reach outward—but we’ll also expand our scope to write about things beyond the self:  other people, other creatures, other places, and other ways of living in the world. We’ll work on the nuts and bolts of the writing (as well as the lumber and the sheets of tin and the panes of glass, etcetera), considering the essay in parts:  the beginning and the end, full-blown scenes and elliptical reflections, white space and titles, allusions and dialogue, and of course, the echoes, patterns, and the connections that lead us to new meaning. As we read literary essays, essays on essays, and a bonus essay collection by one of our amazing Spring 2018 In Print Festival of First Books guests, we’ll think about what it means to write something that matters, to write something that feels really true—and then we will practice.

Class time will be divided between discussions of published works, writing exercises (generative techniques, constraints, word experiments), writer visits, and both small and large group workshops of student writing. Texts: Kept Secret: The Half-Truth in Nonfiction (eds. Jen Hirt & Tina Mitchell); Flesh and Stones: Field Notes from a Finite World by Jan Shoemaker; & a large selection of must-read essays.

 

 

 

ENG 406: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing
Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM

Professor: Silas Hansen

This advanced creative nonfiction writing class will build on the skills/knowledge from ENG 306 in order to ask--and answer--questions like, “What stories/ideas do I really need to tell/explore?” and “What is the best way to tell these stories/explore these ideas?” and “What kind of writer am I, really?”

We will read 5-6 books of creative nonfiction over the course of the semester (possible texts include work by Joan Didion, Jesmyn Ward, Eula Biss, Steven Church, Ryan Van Meter, James Baldwin, Jan Shoemaker, and others) as well as numerous works published in literary journals and craft essays about writing. Based on these readings, we will talk about what makes each writer’s voice distinctive, how they identify and approach their subject matter, and what it means to write, for example, “a Joan Didion essay.” Along the way, you will identify your own subject matter/questions and narrative position and develop a distinctive voice to make your essays your own.

Assignments will include reading responses, short writing exercises, essay drafts/workshop submissions, workshop/peer review responses, craft analyses, and a portfolio of revised work.

 

 

 

ENG 407: Advanced Fiction Writing
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 3:30-4:45 PM

Professor: Sean Lovelace

In this class we will continue many of the concepts of English 307, with an expectation of advanced complexity. The class will focus on student and professional manuscripts in the genre of FLASH FICTION (complete stories—with interest in structure, language, and theme—with a word count under 750 words). We will discuss the spectrum of lyricism versus narrative, and all points in-between. We will read a wide variety of flash fiction texts and critical essays on the genre by professional authors. We will create many (six or more) of our own flash fiction drafts, in a wide variety of schools, from realism to surrealism. And we will workshop those drafts, focusing on constructive feedback and considered revision.

Contact Professor Lovelace (salovelace@bsu.edu) with any questions.

 

 

ENG 407: Advanced Fiction Writing
Section 2: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 12:00-12:50 PM

Professor: Craig O’Hara

This course will function as an active community of working writers and readers engaged in exploring more advanced aspects of writing literary short stories, including vivid and original language, complex characters, and variations of plot from the traditional to the more experimental. The focus of this course will be the writing workshop and the extensive revision that all writers employ to develop their work into finished pieces. The course also includes in-depth reading and discussion of techniques employed by authors recognized in the field. We’ll also engage in active and regular practice of these advanced craft techniques.

In addition to the writing workshop, assignments will include short developmental pieces, student presentations, submission to literary magazines in electronic format, and critical reading responses to contemporary works of fiction. At the end of the semester students will turn in a portfolio of stories revised based on input from our class workshops.

 

 

ENG 408: Advanced Poetry Writing
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: Mark Neely

Poetry in the World

This is an upper-level course in poetry writing. Throughout the course we will talk about how poems engage with the world(s) we live in. How do they report or give witness to, for example, our personal, political, spiritual, and professional lives? And what kind of effects does poetry have on the lives of readers and their communities.

We will read several collections of contemporary poetry (as well poems from a short anthology), and look closely at the formal choices these established poets make in their work. The readings will help inspire and inform the poems written for class, and our discussions of those poems. Written assignments include reading responses, workshop comments, and a portfolio of poems.



ENG 409: Creative Writing in the Community
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 11:00-12:15 PM

Professor: Darolyn “Lyn” Jones

Creative writing projects in the local community, including readings, performances, and workshops.  

Prerequisite: ENG 306 or 307 or 308.

 

 

ENG 410: Advanced Screenwriting
Section 1: Wednesday 6:30-9:10 PM

Professor: Rani Crowe

ADAPTATION

English 410 is an advanced workshop in screenwriting.   We will be building on concepts developed in English 310 through a focus on Adaptation. We will be giving special emphasis to developing Structure through adapting common narrative forms from Poetry, Fairy Tales and Mythology. We will emphasize Character and Dialogue development through adapting real life source material. In English 410, we will practice the advanced processes of Outlining, Research, Revision, Collaborative Writing, and Writing for Production

Students will create a final portfolio of scenes and screenplays. The portfolio will include two individually written 8-12 page screenplays and one group written 8-12 page *CEI production screenplay. The Students will complete screenwriting exercises, view films, read screenplays and other craft related readings.  

*One of the major goals of this course is to provide short scripts for production in Ball State’s Cinema Entertainment Immersion program (the CEI).  Therefore, some emphasis will be given to the development of short screenplays suitable for production here at BSU.  

 

 

ENG 410: Advanced Screenwriting
Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: Matt Mullins

English 410 is an advanced workshop in the theory and practice of screenwriting.  As such, students in this course will write and workshop (i.e., have collectively critiqued) two complete, short screenplays of approximately 10-20 pages each. In addition, they will be asked to complete various screenwriting and script development exercises, view films, and read material related to the craft of screenwriting.  The bulk of this course will focus on the workshopping and collective critique of student-written complete short screenplays, discussion of screenwriting techniques, and the reading and analysis of professionally-written screenplays and screenplay excerpts considered from the perspective of craft. Though we will look at examples of professionally written feature-length scripts and discuss how episodic and feature-length story structures work, our focus in this class will be on the writing of complete short scripts.

Overall, this course is intended to enable students to develop an advanced understanding of concepts addressed in English 310 while also giving them the opportunity to further apply that understanding to their own screenwriting. To this end, student work will involve the following:

- Learning and utilizing the essential techniques of cinematic/visual storytelling                    

- Learning and utilizing the major structural elements of screenwriting form

- Developing and applying an advanced understanding of screenwriting format/style

- Developing original story ideas into scenes and/or complete short screenplays

- Incorporating into their work feedback about format, structure, content, and style from their profession and peers, and revising accordingly

- Reading, evaluating, and offering constructive criticism (both verbal and written) on the work of their classmates

-Reading material related to the craft of screenplay writing and/or screenplays written by established screenwriters

- “Reading” (i.e., analyzing) films/scenes to better understand the craft of screenwriting

- Developing scripts for potential production via Ball State’s Cinema Entertainment Immersion program



ENG 412: Reading in the Secondary English Classroom
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM

Professor: Pam Hartman

Readers today face the difficult challenge of choosing between and making sense of numerous competing texts, in many different forms.   In this course we will investigate theories concerning both what we should read as well as how these texts should be read.  We will also look at our beliefs concerning the very nature of literature and literacy.  For instance, we will consider such questions as the following:  What is literacy?  How is it acquired?  Is there a difference between print literacy and multimedia literacy?  How do broader contexts, such as family and community, affect our literacy or literacies?  While this is not a course in teaching methods, we will develop practical suggestions for decoding, analyzing, and interpreting texts, including literary and popular materials frequently used in the English Language Arts classroom.  Open to all majors who have an interest in exploring these issues.

 

ENG 414: Young Adult Literature
Section 1: Tuesday 6:30-9:10 PM

Professor: Jeff Spanke

Broomsticks can’t fly and vampires don’t twinkle in sunlight. In real life, divergent kids get expelled and no one really ever volunteers as tribute. But just because most teenagers don’t run through mazes for a living, doesn’t mean they don’t all have stories to tell. In this class, we critically examine the genre of Young Adult Literature through the acclaimed texts that grown-ups say exemplify it. What are these books, and who are the people reading them? What makes them so good, and why do so many people think they’re bad? What purpose do they serve in modern day society? Are these dangerous stories of rebellion and grief, or are they liberating tales of redemption and glory? Do they have a place in schools, and what gives adults the right to write about kids anyway? Our reading list, like adolescence, will be long and sometimes tedious; but, like adolescents, the lessons these texts reveal should offer new insights into life, loss, pain, and the possibilities that just might lie in chapters to come.

 

 

ENG 425: Film Studies
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 10:00-10:50 AM
Section 1 Lab: Monday 4:00-6:00 PM

Professor: Sreyoshi Sarkar

What is common to Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s Amelie (French), Woody Allen’s Manhattan (U.S.), and Kiran Rao’s Dhobi Ghat (Indian)? They’re all love letters to the city in which they are set. This course will focus on how world cinema has represented and memorialized cities across the world. We will engage with commercial films, art cinema, and documentaries from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Australia, Latin America, the U.S., and Europe in order to critically analyze films as cultural texts that explore cities as organized at intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality, pay homage to their rich cultural histories or critique its deep divisions and prejudices. To this end we will ask:

-How do the technical aspects of filmmaking (camera angles, color, sound, music, lighting, spatial organization, and editing) work with the plotline, dialogues, and acting to narrate a complex story about the urban experience?

-How do film industries, their politics, and economics shape certain cities e.g. Los Angeles (Hollywood) or Ghana (Nollywood i.e. the Nigerian film industry)?

-How do written narratives of the city compare with cinematic ones?

Possible assignments include maintaining a weekly journal to document your film viewing experience, group presentations, and a final research paper.



ENG 425: Film Studies
Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 5:00-6:15 PM
Section 2 Lab: Wednesday 4:00-6:00 PM

Professor: JoAnne Ruvoli

Some films have an immediate impact while others develop an audience over time. How and why do some films speak to a specific audience? Is it the craft, the content or the context? This class is an introduction to critical viewing and analysis of films.  You will develop a working vocabulary of terms that allows you to analyze, discuss, and write about various aspects of film, including technical matters (types of shots, sound, lighting, narrative structures) and more theoretical issues, including the relationships between films, their audiences, and their cultural contexts.  We will explore the fundamentals of how film as an art form communicates meaning, particularly how story and film style combine to convey ideas and move us emotionally.  We will raise questions about how films influence us, and how we, as the intended audience, shape them.  We will discuss how films reaffirm and also challenge our values.  You should emerge from this class better prepared to watch films carefully, critically, even skeptically, and to write and talk about your responses to them. Weekly films, weekly readings about the films we screen and film elements, weekly Blackboard assignments, one paper, several presentations, midterm and final exams.



ENG 431: Rhetoric, Writing, and Emerging Media
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 9:00-9:50 AM

Professor: Morgan Leckie

Students in this capstone course for Professional Writing Minors will be invited to consider coding and web environment production through foundational and current theories of design, writing, and rhetoric. Pairing informed rhetorical practice with hands on web development, writing, editing, and circulation and Adobe graphic design skills experience enable English 431 students to produce a professional portfolio website for use on the job market and in applying for graduate programs.  

 

 

ENG 435: Issues in Rhetoric and Writing
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: Laura Romano

Born Digital: Creating Oral Histories of Digital Literacy Practices (3)

College students are arguably of the first “born digital” generation; they were born into and raised in a digital world. As this generation comes of age, its members offer unique insight into the ways all areas of life have been shaped by digital technologies, including culture, politics, family life and the way we view community. Taking the opportunity to reflect critically upon these changes is timely, interesting and can be powerfully insightful. This course offers students the opportunity to learn and practice qualitative research methods such as oral history interviewing and ethnographic observation as they create an autoethnographic reflection on their own digital literacy practices.

This course is a requirement for the Rhetoric/Writing major and it can serve as an elective in the English Studies, Creative Writing, and Literature majors. Please contact Dr. Romano (ljromano@bsu.edu) with any questions.

 

 

ENG 444: Senior Seminar
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 3:00-3:50 PM

Professor: Sreyoshi Sarkar

On a daily basis, we encounter multiple non-human subjects - animals, plants, bacteria, cars, electronics, potatoes, water, zombies, and so on. How do these experiences shape our lives? Can they help us imagine more capacious, inclusive, and empowering ways of living with ourselves and with others? Why are so many contemporary authors and filmmakers invested in exploring these interactions in creative-critical ways and to what ends? We will address these questions in this course by deep reading and critically analyzing texts such as DC Comic’s Pride of Baghdad, Chilean poet-diplomat Pablo Neruda’s odes to food including tomatoes and sour cream doughnuts, and Israeli director Eran Riklis’ film Lemon Tree. To this end you will also maintain a journal about your everyday and extraordinary encounters with non-humans, write a research paper, and present a final creative/research project that articulates your own engagements with the above questions. This course is also designed to get you thinking deeply about and working towards applying knowledge and skill sets gained in this course in your professional and personal lives.

 

 

ENG 444: Senior Seminar - Digital Literature Review
Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM

Professor: Adam Beach

This is the second half of a year-long course, and is only open to students in the fall.

 

 

ENG 444: Senior Seminar
Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 5:00-6:15 PM

Professor: Emily Rutter

Food is a key expression of identity and culture, and thus it is no wonder that eating, cooking, and hunger play such crucial symbolic roles in literary traditions the world over. How does food function in literary texts as an expression of identity and/or a common language bridging cultural gaps? Alternatively, how do writers and directors use food (or the lack thereof) as a signifier of current and historical inequities and traumas? In this course, we will answer these questions by engaging a variety of texts, including recent films such as Okja and The Hunger Games, prose such as Kitchen, Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body, and Interpreter of Maladies, and odes to favorite foods by poets such as Terrance Hayes and Frank O’Hara. Through a series of written responses, a presentation, and a final research paper, you will develop your own understandings of the intersections of food, literature, and sociocultural concerns. As the English major capstone course, this course is also designed to synthesize your knowledge and experiences in preparation for reaching your professional goals after graduation.

 

ENG 457: Practicum in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages - Teaching Majors Only
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 8:00-10:30 AM

Professor: Lynne Stallings

The aim of this course is two-fold:  1) to provide students with at least 45 hours of direct teaching experience with English language learners and 2) to provide students an opportunity to reflect on and demonstrate the ways that they are meeting and/or exceeding each of the 11 TESOL standards for PK-12 teacher candidates.  To achieve these goals, students build on their experiences in ENG 436 and ENG 437 and work directly with English language learners in both pull-out and push-in classroom situations at the elementary and/or secondary levels.

 

 

 

ENG 457A: Practicum in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages - TESOL Minors Only
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 8:00-10:30 AM

Professor: Lynne Stallings

The aim of this course is two-fold:  1) to provide students with 30-45 hours of direct teaching experience with English Language Learners (ELLs) and 2) to provide students an opportunity to reflect on and demonstrate the ways that they are meeting and/or exceeding each of the 11 TESOL standards for the teaching of ELLs.  To achieve these goals, students build on their experiences in ENG 436 and ENG 437 and work directly with English language learners in both pull-out and push-in classroom situations at the elementary and/or secondary levels.



ENG 489: Practicum in Literary Editing and Publishing - The Broken Plate
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 5:00-6:15 PM

Professor: Mark Neely

This is the second half of a year-long course, and is only open to students in the Fall section of ENG 489.



ENG 491: Literature of African-American Traditions
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM

Professor: Emily Rutter

This African American literature course will put historical and contemporary black writers and artists in dialogue in order to scrutinize the idea of racial progress in American life. How do African American writers born after the Civil Rights and Black Power movements suggest that the realities of race (along with gender, class, and sexuality) have stayed the same, and in what ways do they track the progress that has been made? In order to answer this crucial question, we will examine racial passing narratives; poems and plays inspired by blues, jazz, and hip hop; and essays about injustice and empowerment. In order to bring these texts and their authors to life, we will also stage a series of imagined conversations between contemporary writers, their predecessors, and other cultural and sociopolitical figures. For example, based on our readings, we will consider what the Harlem Renaissance poet Langston Hughes might ask the hip hop artist Kendrick Lamar about his life and art, and the discussion that novelists Nella Larsen and Danzy Senna might have about crossing color lines in the 1920s versus the 2010s. Other assignments will include active class participation; short textual analyses that will build up to research papers; and exams that we will compose as a class. No prior knowledge of African American literature is required; all are welcome.

 

 

ENG 494: Queer Lit and Queer Theory
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 12:00-12:50 PM

Professor: Rai Peterson

Whether you’ve taken ENG 217 Queer Theory/Queer Literature or not, you’ve invited to enroll in ENG 494 Queer Theory/Queer Literature.  This course covers longer works (mostly novels) by queer authors and writers whose work intersects with queer theory.

The course is designed to accommodate students from diverse majors and academic backgrounds.  The course discussions are challenging, thought-provoking, and engaging.  The reading probes social justice and the queer society member from the present back to Plato.

Previous sections have read authors including Virginia Woolf, Christopher Isherwood, Hanif Kureishi, Thomas Mann, E.M. Forster, Allison Bechdel, Michel Fouccault, Riki Wilchins, Judith Butler, Jack Halberstam, Iris Murdoch, Michael Cunningham, Truman Capote, Patricia Highsmith, Vladimir Nabokov, Sarah Waters, etc.

Assignments are short, but well-researched blog posts, reviews, and creative writing.

Allies and queer-identified students are invited to join this course to learn more, make friends, and consider ways to make sure it gets better.

Email Dr. Rai Peterson for more information: Rai@bsu.edu