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Future Courses

Different semesters bring different class offerings.  Course titles link to expanded descriptions on this page that are written by faculty and more detailed than those in the Undergraduate Catalog.  General descriptions of all English courses are in the Undergraduate Catalog.

 

Summer Courses 2017

1st Summer Session

ENG 206: Reading Literature
ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing
ENG 400: Special Topics in English: Jacket Copy

ENG 414: Young Adult Literature

ENG 425: Film Studies

2nd Summer Session

ENG 213: Introduction to Digital Literacies
ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing
ENG 299X: Experimental/Developmental Topics

Fall 2017 Courses

ENG 150: Introduction to Secondary English Education
ENG 205: World Literature
ENG 206: Reading Literature

ENG 210: Introduction to Rhetoric and Writing
ENG 213: Introduction to Digital Literacies
ENG 215: Introduction to African - American Literature
ENG 217: Introduction to Queer Literature and Queer Theory
ENG 220: Language and Society
ENG 230: Reading and Writing about Literature

ENG 231: Professional Writing
ENG 240: American Literature 1: The Beginnings to 1860

ENG 250: American Literature 2: 1860 to the Present

ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing

ENG 299X: Experimental/Developmental Topics

ENG 306: Creative Nonfiction Writing

ENG 307: Fiction Writing
ENG 308: Poetry Writing

ENG 310: Screenwriting

ENG 320: Introduction to Linguistic Science

ENG 321: English Linguistics
ENG 334: English Linguistics for Educators

ENG 346: Studies in Nineteenth-Century American Literature
ENG 350: Teaching Writing in Secondary Schools

ENG 362: Medieval British Literature
ENG 395: Teaching Literature and Language in Secondary School

ENG 400: Special Topics in English: Digital Literature Review

ENG 400: Special Topics in English: Jacket Copy

ENG 405: Special Topics in Creative Writing

ENG 406: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing

ENG 407: Advanced Fiction Writing

ENG 408: Advanced Poetry Writing
ENG 410: Advanced Screenwriting

ENG 412: Reading Printed Materials in the English Classroom
ENG 414: Young Adult Literature

ENG 425: Film Studies
ENG 430: Document Design and Visual Rhetoric

ENG 436: Theory and Research in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
ENG 437: Methods and Materials in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
ENG 444: Senior Seminar
ENG 464: Shakespeare
ENG 489: Practicum in Literary Editing and Publishing
ENG 490: Literature and Gender

ENG 493: American Ethnic Literature





 

 

SUMMER 2017 UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

1st Summer Session

ENG 206: Reading Literature

Section 1: Monday – Friday 11:00 AM -12:35 PM

Professor: Emily Rutter

English 206 is an introduction to the interpretation of literary works and to writing critically about literature. In our class, we will develop these skills by engaging with literature that centralizes food. How do novels, poems, films, and cookbooks use the language of food to convey cultural norms? Moreover, how do American writers use food to explore issues of ethnic identity, lineage, diaspora, and cultural belonging? We will pursue these questions in possible texts by Monique Truong, Jhumpa Lahiri, Kevin Young, Mark Kurlansky, and Laura Esquivel, among others. Asking these questions of literature will also assist us in better understanding our own relationship to food and culture. Assignments will include informal digital responses, essays, and exams.

The class satisfies the Tier I (Humanities and Fine Arts) requirement for the University Core Curriculum Program.  It is designed for students who are not majoring in English.



ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing

Section 1: Monday – Friday 12:45-2:20 PM

Professor: Emily Scalzo

English 285 offers an introduction to the art and craft of writing poetry and prose that’s worth reading. The course will focus on development of writing craft, obtainment of a critical/literary vocabulary, and a reading, examination, and discussion of established authors. As students and writers, you will read and analyze high quality published work, write and revise your own pieces, and read and discuss the work of your classmates. Time permitting, I also hope to introduce you to the world of literary journals and publishing as well. This course does not require you to be an experienced and/or gifted creative writer; it does require you to be willing to read, analyze, and do your best on your own work. The structure will move from creative nonfiction to fiction to poetry, with a workshop aspect near the end of the semester.  This is a reading and writing intensive course.



ENG 400: Special Topics in English: Jacket Copy
Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 5:30-8:10 PM

Professor: Eva Grouling Snider
Students in this immersive learning course will manage the public communications portfolios of two real-world organizations: the Ball State University English Department and a yet-to-be-determined community partner. Students will work together to produce promotional materials, manage social media, maintain websites, edit blogs, conduct focus groups, and much more. Students will gain valuable professional experience in a variety of fields, including editing/publishing, content marketing, public relations, graphic design, web development, strategic communications, and social media management.
 
If you are interested in joining the class, please contact Eva Grouling Snider (esnider@bsu.edu) for more information.


ENG 414: Young Adult Literature

Section 1: Monday – Friday 11:00-12:35 PM

Professor: Pamela Hartman

English 414 focuses on recent literature, representing multiple genres, that is suitable for young adult readers.  The emphasis is primarily on the reading and analysis of literature with some attention given to methodology.  The goals of the course including creating a community of readers and learners who will respond both aesthetically and analytically to literature and who will become familiar with the wide range of Young Adult Literature (YAL) as well as develop an appreciation of YAL as a genre of study.  In addition, we will explore the value of YAL as a means to stimulate young adults’ interest in reading, to bridge children’s and adult literature, and to encourage the habit of lifelong reading.


ENG 425: Film Studies

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 12:45-2:40 PM

Lab: Tuesday and Thursday 12:45-3:00 PM

Professor: Matt Hartman

This course is an introduction to the study of film.  We will examine the formal elements of film (mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, sound, and narrative), with an emphasis on analyzing film critically.  We will also explore the social contexts of film, considering films as complex cultural texts. Our goal is to make the invisible visible, to see and think about things you may not have noticed in movies before.  In addition, the course will expose you to a variety of great films in different styles and genres, hopefully broadening your appreciation for film and introducing you to film history.


2nd Summer Session

ENG 213: Introduction to Digital Literacies

Section 2: Monday – Friday 11:00-12:15 PM

Professor: Rory Lee

People commonly define literacy as the mere ability to read and write, but such a definition ignores the contexts in which and the reasons why we read and write as well as the changing ways in which we now read and write digitally.  This course will broaden your understanding of literacy by asking you to engage with not only the notion of literacy as a situated act of knowing and doing inextricably linked to technology(ies) but also the idea of literacies—plural.  In so doing, you’ll also explore what literacy means and looks like in the context of the digital.  Or phrased as a question:  what sort of literacy practices do we enact in the digital realm and how, if at all, are they similar to, different from, and filtered through ones we enact in non-digital environments?

To assist you in this exploration of digital ways of knowing and doing, you’ll work with (and against) various frameworks for understanding literate acts; in addition, you’ll be introduced to a brief history and some select theories of media, the genres common to and produced through them, and the connections between media, old and new.  In an effort to expand your own digital literacy, you’ll use various media, technologies, and composing tools to create a diverse set of digital texts for external real-world audiences.  Along the way, you’ll employ various digital practices such as content and interface design, remediation and remix, and researching in a publish-then-filter economy.

Throughout the course, you’ll grapple with the personal, social, educational, political, economic, and ethical consequences of these (often emerging) digital literacy practices.  In particular, you’ll grapple with the following big ideas:

  • rhetoric is multimodal, epistemic, and a tool for solving problems;
  • literacies (plural) are inextricably linked to technology and result in inclusion and exclusion;
  • ·nothing is new or original;
  • technology isn’t neutral, but it doesn’t determine culture;
  • rhetoric, technology, and literacy shape and are shaped by culture.

In addition, you’ll take up the following questions (and more):

  • what is literacy, and what does it mean to be literate?
  • how does literacy shape—and how is it shaped by—technologies?
  • how is literacy both descriptive and evaluative?
  • how are literacies situated hierarchically?
  • what is the relationship between literacy and cognition?
  • how does access impact and affect literacy acquisition and instruction?
  • how do technologies emerge, evolve, and gain traction historically?
  • how does our culture digitally make sense of and comment on culture writ large?
  • how are knowledge and meaning created in the digital realm, and how is such creation restricted?
  • what habits have you developed as a result of your access to digital technologies, and what are potential implications of those habits?
  • how do digital tools promote and constrain identity formation?
  • how does information circulate digitally, and how can we determine which information is credible?

To ground and frame our work this semester, we’ll move across three units:

Unit 1:  Literacy, Literacies, and the Digital

Unit 2:  The Evolution and Intersection of Technologies and Texts

Unit 3:  The Personal, Social, and Cultural Implications of Emerging Digital Literacy Practices


ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing

Section 2: Monday – Friday 9:15-10:50 AM

Professor: Todd McKinney

As an introduction to Creative Writing, this class will provide the students with the opportunity to write fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. To do this, we will explore the possibilities of the three genres by reading and discussing a number of stories, poems, and essays while also working on our own pieces. We will also take time to think about and practice the revision process. In short, this class asks the students to write a lot and to read a lot—the best way to become a better writer.

Assignments for the class will include drafts, workshop critiques, a daily journal, reading responses and/or quizzes, as well as a final revised project. These assignments and exercises will challenge students to think creatively and critically to better understand how we make/shape/bend/warp meaning out of language and experience as we continue exploring what it means to be alive on earth.

Possible texts may include Janet Burroway’s Imaginative Writing and Natalie Goldberg’s Writing Down the Bones.


ENG 299X: Experimental/Developmental Topics

Topic: Literary Citizenship

Section 2: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 2:30-5:10 PM

Professor: Jama Bigger, director of the Midwest Writers Workshop

This course will teach you how to take advantage of the opportunities offered by your campus, local, regional and national literary communities and how you can best contribute to those communities given your talents and interests. It will also help you begin to professionalize yourself as a writer or in a writing-related career.

You will learn:

1.) how use a professional blog or website as a literary citizen

2.) organize a multi-day literary event

3.) create content for the Midwest Writers Workshop’s e-newsletter, website, and social media

4.) promote the event to local, state, and national constituencies

5.) interview writers

6.) review books.

You will apply what you learned and serve as either a Literary Agent Assistant or a Social Media Tutor at the Midwest Writers Workshop, a national writing conference, which takes place on July 20-22, 2017. Note: this course can count as an elective in the English major or possibly as a required course. Please contact Prof. Cathy Day (cday@bsu.edu) to see how you might count it in your major or minor.


 

FALL 2017 UNDERGRADUATE COURSES


ENG 150: Introduction to Secondary English Education
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM

Professor: Lyn Jones 

An introduction to secondary English teaching. Content includes an informed vision of English and English teaching, developing basic skills for teaching English, and beginning preparation for teacher licensure.

ENG 150: Introduction to Secondary English Education
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: Jeff Spanke

"If you're reading this, it probably means that somewhere along the line, somebody had a positive and lasting impact on your life. Maybe it was a coach. Or a baby-sitter. A tutor, Captain, minister, parent, principal, or even an actor. Maybe it was just that one person who asked if you were okay that one time when you weren't really okay. Or that one teacher who made you feel safe and whole and not as small. Whatever the case, the fact that you're reading this illustrates the life-altering effects that teachers--in whatever form they may take--can have on our lives. In this course, we examine Language Arts Education as an empowering, professional, creative, and exciting field of study. Since teachers rarely get the credit they deserve, this course emphasizes the daily influence that teachers have on future generations. We explore the teaching profession as the complex, rigorous, ambiguous, and oftentimes just flat-out struggle that it is. But we never forget that it is through this struggle that student lives are changed. As teachers, it's a privilege to be a part of that."

ENG 205: World Literature

Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: Sreyoshi Sarkar

This course looks at both fiction and non-fiction from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America to see how writers have responded to key social, political and/or environmental events that have shaped their lives in the 20th. and 21st. centuries. Readings include the works of Chinua Achebe (Nigeria), Bapsi Sidhwa (Pakistan), Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Columbia), Amitav Ghosh (India), Nadine Gordimer (South Africa), Marjane Satrapi (Iran), Ruth Ozeki (Japan), and Viet Thanh Nguyen (Vietnam) amongst others. Some key issues that will guide our discussions of these texts are - How do they track and critique the violence of colonialism, ethnic conflict, and class and gender discriminations? How do they represent encounters amongst humans, and their environments in everyday lives and in extraordinary circumstances? What kinds of futures do they envision for us? Assignments will focus on deep reading texts for their major themes, formal elements, innovative aesthetics, and politics; we will prepare for this via in-class writing workshops. No prior knowledge of texts or authors required; all are welcome.
 



ENG 206: Reading Literature

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 10:00-10:50 AM

Professor: Rai Peterson

An introduction to the nature and interpretation of literary works and to reading and writing critically about literature.



ENG 206: Reading Literature

Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 11:00-12:15 PM

Professor: JoAnne Ruvoli

“Harmony and Clash”: English 206 is an introduction to the nature and interpretation of literary works and to reading and writing critically about literature. We will use the course to examine how novels, stories, poetry, and memoirs have used music as subject and form in literature. Readings may include: Proulx’s Accordion Crimes, Baldwin’s Going to Meet the Man, Alexie’s Reservation Blues, Shoup’s Wish You Were Here, and Patchett’s Bel Canto in addition to essays, poems, and song lyrics. Evaluation will be based on quizzes, two short papers, a midterm and a final exam.



ENG 210: Introduction to Rhetoric and Writing

Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 5:00-6:15 PM

Professor:Rory Lee

Introduction to the field of Rhetoric and Writing studies. Readings and written work that emphasize the diversity and scope of the field. Please contact Professor Lee for more information.



ENG 213: Introduction to Digital Literacies

Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM

Professor: Morgan Gross

Introduction to Digital Literacies will teach you ways of reading, analyzing, researching, and composing in emerging media. This section includes an exploration of important terms and moments in the history of literacy to offer context to our understanding of the “digital age” in which we now live. We will look at multiple perspectives on how new ways of reading and writing affect how we think and make meaning of/in the world. Much of the course will focus on developing students' critical digital literacy, as we examine topics such as racism and sexism in the digital sphere, online identity formation, the effects of new technologies on human relationships, general disillusion with the idea of “internet freedom,” slack/hack/activism, internet surveillance, net neutrality, copyright law, and so on. However, we will also consider the affordances that our cyborg culture offers and the ways in which we can use new technologies mindfully for positive impact. This kind of critical digital literacy requires you to be cognizant of the social, political, economic, and ethical consequences of your communicative actions. Thus, in addition to studying issues in digital literacy, you will also be developing skills of digital literacy as we experiment with new technologies/digital tools to compose research and share information in rhetorically effective ways. 

 

 



ENG 213: Introduction to Digital Literacies

Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 11:00-12:15 PM

Professor: Sara Strasser

Teaches ways of reading, analyzing, researching, and composing in emerging media.



ENG 213: Introduction to Digital Literacies

Section 3: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 9:00-9:50 AM

Section 4: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 1:00-1:50 PM

Professor: Laura Romano

This course asks students to challenge the traditional understanding of literacy and the ability to read and write by asking them to engage with not only the idea of literacy as a situated act of knowing and doing inextricably linked to technology(ies) but also the idea of literacies- plural. More specifically, students will explore what literacy means and looks like in the context of the digital. Phrased as a question: what sort of literacy practices do we enact in the digital realm and how, if at all, are they similar to, or different from, and filtered through ones we enact in analog culture?

Throughout the course, students will grapple with the social, political, economic and ethical consequences of these (often emerging) digital literacy practices. In particular, they’ll take up the following questions: how is literacy both descriptive and evaluative, how are literacies stated hierarchically, how does access impact and affect digital acquisition and instruction, how does our culture digitally make sense of and comment on culture writ large, how does the digital allow groups to form and act in ways they couldn’t previously, and what happens when the grassroots culture fostered through digital literacy practices intersects with corporate culture?

ENG 215: Introduction to African - American Literature

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 12:00-12:50 PM

Professor: Emily Rutter

This course will provide you with foundational knowledge about African American literary traditions, while centralizing the work of black women writers. Beyoncé Knowles-Carter’s visual album Lemonade (2016) will be our central thematic reference point as we explore the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality in a wide range of texts that precede and are contemporaneous with this groundbreaking album. Engaging fiction, poetry, autobiography, black feminist theory, and film, we will consider how artists of African descent have exposed and resisted oppression. We will encounter Angela Y. Davis and Mahogany Browne, both of whom will visit BSU campus this Fall, as well as Toni Morrison, Roxane Gay, Octavia Butler, Warsan Shire, among others. Assignments will include active class participation; short textual analyses that will build up to research papers; and exams that we will compose as a class. No prior knowledge of African American literature is required; all are welcome.

ENG 217: Introduction to Queer Literature and Queer Theory

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 3:00-3:50 PM

Professor: Rai Peterson


Introduction to queer literature and queer readings of texts as well as exploration and discussion of queer theory. Course materials and exploration are appropriate for students who are not majors or minors in English. Credit does not apply to English majors.



ENG 220: Language and Society

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 9:00-9:50 AM

Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 11:00-12:15 PM

 

Professor: Mai Kuha

You speak the way you do because of who you are and where you are from. You also adjust the way you speak according to the situation. In this course, we will discuss the nature of this language variation and how its interaction with social attitudes affects our lives.

Our look at the nature of language variation will include:

  • the main features of dialects of English in the U.S. (regional dialects and African American English)
  • a brief look at how language and gender connect
  • how language change results in language variation
  • the main facts about the presence of minority languages in the U.S.

When looking at the impact of the interaction between language variation and social attitudes, we will consider

  • how people are judged because of the way they speak,
  • how this affects linguistic minorities in the educational system, and
  • how language attitudes find their way into legislation.

ENG 230: Reading and Writing about Literature

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 2:00-2:50 PM

Professor: Allison Layfield

This class is designed to introduce you to the methods of inquiry, rhetorical and documentation conventions, and terminology associated with critical writing about literature. Students will develop skills for successful study, discussion, and writing about literature.


You will become well-rounded readers of literature through studying short fiction, poetry, drama and the novel, and leave this course feeling confident in your ability to read, interpret and write about a variety of literature.  The course is designed for students entering the English major in Creative Writing, Literature, or English Education.

ENG 230: Reading and Writing about Literature

Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 11:00-12:15 PM

Professor: Molly Ferguson

The Russian writer Leo Tolstoy wrote that “all great literature is one of two stories; a man goes on a journey or a stranger comes to town." With the second part of this quote in mind, the theme of this course will be “the stranger,” and we will study works about people who are outcasts, outsiders, and foreigners in their environments or within themselves. Sometimes the stranger’s voice will control the narrative, and in other works the stranger will be viewed from the outside. Using this as a lens to study very different genres of literature, we will discuss how and why we label others as strangers or strange, and how feeling different can shape the way a person acts/reacts. Works will include plays, a novel, and selected short stories, films, and poetry from around the world. These texts will serve as a springboard for our discussion as we move toward an understanding of what it means for each of us to be both critical readers and writers. 



ENG 230: Reading and Writing about Literature

Section 3: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: Molly Ferguson

The Russian writer Leo Tolstoy wrote that “all great literature is one of two stories; a man goes on a journey or a stranger comes to town." With the second part of this quote in mind, the theme of this course will be “the stranger,” and we will study works about people who are outcasts, outsiders, and foreigners in their environments or within themselves. Sometimes the stranger’s voice will control the narrative, and in other works the stranger will be viewed from the outside. Using this as a lens to study very different genres of literature, we will discuss how and why we label others as strangers or strange, and how feeling different can shape the way a person acts/reacts. Works will include plays, a novel, and selected short stories, films, and poetry from around the world. These texts will serve as a springboard for our discussion as we move toward an understanding of what it means for each of us to be both critical readers and writers.

ENG 231: Professional Writing

Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: G Patterson

The goal of English 231 is to help you develop written and oral skills that can be applied in a variety of professional contexts. You will practice workplace communication skills by studying and employing various strategies, forms, and techniques of effective persuasive writing. It is my hope that you will invest yourself in improving your craft through these tasks as writing is or will be an essential and marketable part of your working life.

In this class you will learn and practice the basic processes, genres, formats, and editing strategies used by successful writers from all professions. I will also provide you with opportunities to experiment with writing as a way to think through course material and/or writing assignments. This course will emphasize rhetorical principles, which means writing is judged effective if it meets the needs of the audience, fulfills its communicative purpose, and is ethical.

By the end of the semester, you should be able to:

  • Analyze audience, purpose, genre conventions, and situational constraints for all communications.
  • Produce various common workplace documents such as business correspondence, long reports, and career documents.
  • Design and organize your documents with usability and readability in mind.
  • Edit for precision, clarity, conciseness, and accuracy.
  • Collaborate with others to improve your writing.

ENG 231: Professional Writing

Section 2: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 2:00-2:50 PM

Professor: Kelsie Walker

This course invites students to not only experience professional writing as a practical endeavor--writing common workplace genres such as memos and resumes--but to explore it also as a theoretical endeavor, one that accounts for topics such as the rhetorical nature of professional writing, language attitudes about correctness and style, and social media ethics. For example, students will engage in projects that ask them to analyze the writing practices of professionals in their field or career, and that challenge them to develop a digital brand and identity via a digital portfolio or website. By bringing together practical and theoretical concerns, this course prepares students to both navigate and think critically about professional writing genres they'll engage with during college and in their future careers.

ENG 240: American Literature 1: The Beginnings to 1860

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 2:00-2:50 PM

Professor: Ben Bascom

In this course we will explore the major themes, tropes, and texts of American literature before 1865—a task that will lead us across vast terrains and into the controversies of multiple historical periods. We will begin with Christopher Columbus’s letters to the king of Spain about his colonial contact with indigenous peoples in the Americas and conclude with Abraham Lincoln’s “letter” to the fractured United States in “The Gettysburg Address.” While these bookends may seem to imply the inevitability of the United States as our recognizable nation, we will complicate that narrative by focusing on moments of possibility and rupture in the story we tell of Pilgrims landing and colonials revolting. Indeed, through framing our discussion around the concept of “multiple Americas,” we will highlight what the geographic space of “America” has meant to a variety of writers, actors, and characters. Through an attention to the formal aspects and negotiations of literary genre and author biography, we will delve into texts and narratives that convey histories of conquest and slavery, religious conversion and enlightenment self-making, and collective identification and popular protest that have come to constitute the canon of American literature.

 

ENG 250: American Literature 2: 1860 to the Present

Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM

Professor: Andrea Wolfe

This course will survey American authors and literary movements from 1860 to the present. It will include texts from a broad range of genres as well as major and minority traditions. Subtitled “American Texts, American Contexts,” the course will focus on methods for reading selected texts in appropriate historical, cultural, political, critical, and theoretical contexts. Students will be evaluated based on class participation, reading quizzes, a series of short papers, and a final exam.

 



ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing

Section 2: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 10:00-10:50 AM

Professor: Todd McKinney

As an introduction to Creative Writing, this class will provide the students with the opportunity to write fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. To do this, we will explore the possibilities of the three genres by reading and discussing a number of stories, poems, and essays while also working on our own pieces. We will also take time to think about and practice the revision process. In short, this class asks the students to write a lot and to read a lot—the best way to become a better writer.

Assignments for the class will include drafts, workshop critiques, a daily journal, reading responses and/or quizzes, as well as a final revised project. These assignments and exercises will challenge students to think creatively and critically to better understand how we make/shape/bend/warp meaning out of language and experience as we continue exploring what it means to be alive on earth.

Texts may include Janet Burroway’s Imaginative Writing and Natalie Goldberg’s Writing Down the Bones.



ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing

Section 3: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 11:00-11:50 AM

Professor: Beth Dalton

This class provides an introduction to the craft of writing fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Writers must read, so in order to learn the “how” of writing literature, we will look at the ways in which experienced writers build their poems and narratives. Drawing from these examples, in addition to information from texts on craft, students will draft fresh, original work. Then, with instructor and peer feedback, they will learn the value and rewards of revision. By semester’s end, students will begin to understand the demands and pleasures of the writing life, as well as the role intentionality plays in the literature they read and write.  

Assignments include drafts, revisions, workshop critiques, a journal, and reading responses and/or quizzes.



ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing

Section 4: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 1:00-1:50 PM

Professor: Michael Begnal


Introduction to the craft, terminology, and techniques of multiple genres, including fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Creative writing is more than just “making stuff up”—it requires making choices, taking risks, and rethinking those choices and risks through the process of revision. This course will introduce students to the basics of crafting creative work in three genres: poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Students are expected to write and revise at least four poems, one short story, and one non-fiction piece for their final grade. We will focus on language, image, structure, dialogue, and character, among other fundamentals. Because being a good writer requires that you also be a good reader, we will also devote considerable time to reading and discussing published work. Along with completing various short writing assignments, students will produce original writing in each of the three genres, as well as revisions. Our workshops give you an audience for your poems and stories. After hearing several responses, you can better gauge what kind of revisions to make. Be prepared to write as often as possible, whether in or out of class. Attendance, participation, and engagement are mandatory. No prior writing experience is necessary; all you need is a desire to write. This course counts as a Writing-Intensive Course.



ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing

Section 5: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 2:00-2:50 PM

Professor: Beth Dalton

This class provides an introduction to the craft of writing fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Writers must read, so in order to learn the “how” of writing literature, we will look at the ways in which experienced writers build their poems and narratives. Drawing from these examples, in addition to information from texts on craft, students will draft fresh, original work. Then, with instructor and peer feedback, they will learn the value and rewards of revision. By semester’s end, students will begin to understand the demands and pleasures of the writing life, as well as the role intentionality plays in the literature they read and write.  

Assignments include drafts, revisions, workshop critiques, journals, and reading responses and/or quizzes.




ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing

Section 6: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 3:00-3:50 PM

Professor: Kathryn Gardiner


Introduction to creative writing with an emphasis on poetry, short fiction, screenwriting, and creative nonfiction. The course will encourage the development of creative writing skills across all forms and genres, along with the expansion of students’ critical vocabulary through in-class discussion. There will be writing, reading, talking, and a lot of fun.




ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing

Section 8: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM

Professor: Peter Davis

Through a lot of reading and writing, we’ll explore the major genres of creative writing and hopefully have tons of fun learning more about how to understand, appreciate, and produce artistic works. Students should leave the class with a more profound sense of the creative process and how it functions in the real world and in their own lives, particularly as that process relates to writing. And, occasionally, we’ll have snacks.



ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing

Section 9: Tuesday and Thursday 11:00-12:15 PM

Professor: Peter Bethanis

This course is designed to explore creative writing as a craft and art form. Students will read and write various genres of creative writing with the intent to trigger and develop authentic subjects and styles in creative writing projects. The course is geared to generate creativity utilizing workshops, texts, heuristics, and peer-review. A multitude of authors and genres of creative writing will be covered.

ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing

Section 10: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: Emily Scalzo

English 285 offers an introduction to the art and craft of writing poetry and prose that’s worth reading. The course will focus on development of writing craft, obtainment of a critical/literary vocabulary, and a reading, examination, and discussion of established authors. As students and writers, you will read and analyze high quality published work, write and revise your own pieces, and read and discuss the work of your classmates. Time permitting, I also hope to introduce you to the world of literary journals and publishing as well. This course does not require you to be an experienced and/or gifted creative writer; it does require you to be willing to read, analyze, and do your best on your own work. The structure will move from creative nonfiction to fiction to poetry, with a workshop aspect near the end of the semester.  This is a reading and writing intensive course.

ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing

Section 11: Tuesday and Thursday 3:30-4:45 PM

Professor: Emily Scalzo

English 285 offers an introduction to the art and craft of writing poetry and prose that’s worth reading. The course will focus on development of writing craft, obtainment of a critical/literary vocabulary, and a reading, examination, and discussion of established authors. As students and writers, you will read and analyze high quality published work, write and revise your own pieces, and read and discuss the work of your classmates. Time permitting, I also hope to introduce you to the world of literary journals and publishing as well. This course does not require you to be an experienced and/or gifted creative writer; it does require you to be willing to read, analyze, and do your best on your own work. The structure will move from creative nonfiction to fiction to poetry, with a workshop aspect near the end of the semester. This is a reading and writing intensive course.

ENG 285: Introduction to Creative Writing

Section 12: Tuesday and Thursday 5:00-6:15 PM

Professor: Brian Morrison

English 285 is an introduction to writing poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. The course will focus on development of writing craft, obtainment of a critical/literary vocabulary, and a reading, examination, and discussion of established authors. This class will be centered in active learning. You will read a great amount of excellent material; you will write a great amount, and you will strive to make it excellent. I will attempt to spark and develop your creativity. To that end, you will create your own original poems, stories, and essays.

 

ENG 299X: Experimental/Developmental Topics

Topic: “Storytelling and Social Justice”

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 2:00-2:50 PM

Professor: Emily Rutter

“Storytelling and Social Justice” will facilitate a reciprocal relationship between Ball State undergraduate students and Teamwork for Quality Living, a local nonprofit focused on decreasing poverty in our community. Students will receive storytelling instruction from me, as well as guidance from Dorica Watson, a credentialed Teamwork social worker, about how to build relationships across lines of class, race, and gender. Students will use this knowledge to assist Teamwork members in documenting their personal journeys from poverty toward self-sufficiency. These stories will then become part of a short documentary film and an electronic book. While Ms. Watson and I will play key instructional roles, Ball State students will produce the short documentary film and electronic book themselves in conjunction with their Teamwork partners. In the process, Ball State students will gain valuable experience working in the fields of telecommunications, graphic design, professional writing, adult education, and social work. Additionally, students will bolster their cultural competency skills, which are in increasing demand in our ever-diversifying nation. Perhaps most importantly, “Storytelling and Social Justice” will forge stronger connections between our campus and the community, ensuring that an equal value is placed on all of the voices in Delaware County.

Please email Emily Rutter (
errutter@bsu.edu) to request permission to enroll in this course.


ENG 306: Creative Nonfiction Writing

Section 1: Monday and Wednesday 5:00-6:15 PM

Professor: Silas Hansen

The word essay comes from the French verb “essayer”--to try. In this creative nonfiction class, we will try to understand both our own lives and the world around us through the act of writing personal essays. We will begin by making sense of our own lived experiences through personal narrative and memoir; in the second half of the semester, we will look at the larger world and study travel writing, food writing, profiles, cultural criticism, and more. Throughout the semester, we will study the craft elements that make for excellent essays (scene-writing, characterization, research, structure, language, voice, etc.), which you will practice in writing exercises and essay drafts.

Assignments will include brief reading responses/quizzes, short writing exercises, essay drafts/workshop submissions, workshop/peer review responses, and a portfolio of revised work. Texts may include Brenda Miller and Suzanne Paolo’s craft text Tell It Slant, Lex Williford and Michael Martone’s anthology The Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction, and essays published in recent issues of literary journals.

ENG 306: Creative Nonfiction Writing

Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM                             

Professor: Jill Christman

In this creative nonfiction class we will focus on the techniques and art of the personal essay to explore how we think and why. Using our own memories, experiences, & perceptions as the lenses through which we record the world, we’ll prime our writing juices by crafting short creative responses to specific reading-inspired prompts, move on to a longer essay rooted in personal experience, and as the term progresses we’ll expand our scope to write about things beyond the self—other people, other objects, other places, other ways of being in the world. We’ll work on the nuts-and-bolts of the writing (research strategies, structure, point of view, storytelling, time-handling, language) as we tackle the big questions facing us:  What do I want to write about and why? What about memory and forgetting? What shape might best serve this essay? What does it mean to say something true?

Possible Texts: Tell It Slant (eds. Brenda Miller & Suzanne Paolo) & The Touchstone Anthology of Creative Nonfiction (eds. Michael Martone & Lex Williford).



ENG 307: Fiction Writing

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 12:00-12:50 PM

Professor: Craig O’Hara

This course centers on the fundamentals of writing the literary short story—vivid concrete language, three-dimensional characters, complex plot—with an emphasis on the student’s ability to write clearly and dramatically. The focus of this course will be the writing workshop and the extensive revision that all writers employ to develop their work into polished pieces. The course also includes discussion of, and hands-on practice with, elements of the craft and in-depth class discussions of the techniques employed by authors recognized in the field.

In addition to the writing workshop, assignments include short developmental pieces and critical reading responses to contemporary works of fiction. At the end of the semester students will turn in a portfolio of revised stories and a submission of work to a literary magazine.

Texts may include:

Janet Burroway’s Writing Fiction, including contemporary works of short fiction by writers such as Junot Diaz, Denis Johnson, and Lorrie Moore.

ENG 307: Fiction Writing

Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 11:00-12:15 PM

Professor: Angela Jackson Brown

The course is designed to take students (and the professor) further into the art and craft of fiction than can be covered in a creative writing overview course. It raises questions about the value of fiction, what makes fiction good, successful, outstanding and beautiful, and how to workshop and Re-Vision your fiction. The student will also submit critical essays in response to the readings of writers whose work they are to emulate and celebrate. We will examine the writing of the masters as well as some up-and-coming contemporary writers.. The course is specifically designed for those who wish to develop a writing routine on their own, as well as those who plan to continue the study of fiction in ENG 407 or some other upper level fiction writing class or workshop.

Texts may include:

Janet Burroway’s Writing Fiction and supplemental reading

ENG 308: Poetry Writing

Section 1: Monday and Wednesday 3:00-4:15 PM

Professor: Rebecca Manery

“Poetry’s work is the clarification and magnification of being,” writes poet Jane Hirshfield. In this course we will undertake poetry’s work through the study of a diverse range of contemporary poetry and a series of engagements with poetry making that will cover a variety of forms and techniques. Students will select and introduce an anthology of favorite poems as well as assemble a portfolio of their own work; students may also have the opportunity to set and print a broadside of one of their poems in partnership with the Book Arts Collaborative.

Texts may include: Ordinary Genius: A Guide for the Poet Within by Kim Addonizio and Nine Gates: Entering the Mind of Poetry by Jane Hirshfield.  

ENG 308: Poetry Writing

Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 5:00-6:15 PM

Professor: Katy Didden

What is poetry? In this class, we will search for the answer to this question by reading, writing, and sharing poetry. By the end of this course, you will gain a repertoire of new rhythms, a storehouse of rhymes, and a facility with forms and structures.  You will learn tools for starting poems, tools for shaping poems, and tools for stealing the best writing tricks from other writers.  You will also encounter poems that stir the blood, and learn lines you will remember for the rest of your life. This workshop is designed to provide guidance, feedback, and ideas to aid you in your current writing process. We will approach this from three different angles: first we will read, study, and discuss the work of established and emerging poets with great attention, gathering tools for our own work; second, we will experiment with poetic forms and traditions, from sonnets to spoken word, so that we understand poetry’s traditions and evolutions; third, we will learn from each other how to build a community of writers, and what it means to read, critique, encourage, and perform poetry today.



ENG 310: Screenwriting

Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 5:00-6:15 PM

Professor: Rani Crowe

English 310 is an introductory course focusing on short form screenwriting with an emphasis on dramatic writing that can be translated from page to screen. Students will complete writing exercises to build muscles in Visual Storytelling, Screenplay Format, Character and World Development, Genre, and Structure. Additionally, students will watch various styles of short films and media, read screenplays and other craft related readings. Students will build skills in analysis and critical response through group workshops. The course will culminate in a final 10-15 page screenplay that we will take through a process of planning, workshopping, and revision.



ENG 310: Screenwriting

Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM

Professor: Matt Mullins

English 310 is an introductory course in the theory and practice of screenwriting. In this course students will write and workshop one original, short screenplay of roughly 10-20 pages and a scene/excerpt of 3-5 pages from that same short script. In addition they will complete a number of screenwriting exercises, view films, and read screenplays and other material related to the craft of screenwriting.  This course has two primary areas of concern:  learning screenplay format/style and developing a basic understanding of how compelling, cinematic storytelling works. Much of this course will focus on the workshopping and collective critique of student screenplays and the reading and analysis of screenplays and screenplay excerpts considered from the perspective of craft. Our focus will be on the discussion, analysis, and practice of the techniques and processes of screenwriting. This includes matters of format, content, structure, style, drafting, and revision, among other things. This course is intended to introduce students to the basic concepts of good screenwriting technique and cinematic storytelling while also giving them the opportunity to apply that understanding to their own short screenplays.  

ENG 310: Screenwriting

Section 3: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 9:00-9:50 AM

Section 4: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 10:00-10:50 AM

Section 5: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 11:00-11:50 AM

Professor: Kathryn Gardiner

English 310 is an introduction to the art of visual storytelling for film, television, and new media; to basic terminology and techniques of script writing, as well as methods of workshop and peer critique. Students will build an 8-10-page short film script, developing skills in plot, character, structure, and formatting. The goal of this course is to nurture and strengthen storytelling skills, with special emphasis on workshopping, media analysis, and visual narrative techniques.

Possible Required Text: The Screenwriter’s Bible (6th Edition) by David Trottier



ENG 320: Introduction to Linguistic Science

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 2:00-2:50 PM

Professor: Mary Lou Vercellotti

The basic concepts, scope, and methodology of the science of language in its descriptive and historical functions.

 

ENG 321: English Linguistics

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 1:00-1:50 PM

Professor: Mai Kuha

The goal of this course is to give students an informed perspective on English sentence structure, leading to an understanding of basic grammatical structure, relationship, and terminology. We also consider sentence structure in the context of discourse.

English majors and minors are considered by the public to be experts about their language and are therefore expected to know the basic concepts and terminology of English sentence structure. Non-English majors benefit from the course in that the study of English sentence structure helps them understand how languages are structured.

Completing this course should enable you to...

o   use writers’ handbooks or other reference materials with ease, having become familiar with grammatical terminology and concepts

o   evaluate the quality of advice that these authorities give you about sentence structure

o   using reference materials, figure out unfamiliar sentence structures by looking for patterns and forming hypotheses

o   using reference materials, decide which analysis fits a sentence best, and say why (this is more useful and creative than relying on an authority)

o   include a greater variety of structures in your writing more effectively and deliberately, and

o   offer a well-informed opinion on sentence structure when your friends or colleagues discuss a linguistic issue, such as some detail in a political speech or an ad for some product.

Specific objectives that you personally may have for this course depend on what career path is ahead for you.

I hope this course will empower you to take ownership of your language!

 

 


ENG 334: English Linguistics for Educators

Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM

Professor: Lynne Stallings

Are you interested in teaching English Language Learners either in the United States or in another country?  If so, this course is a great place to start your preparation.  This course will provide an essential foundation in the nature of human language, the structure of English in contrast with other languages frequently spoken by English language learners, and the social context of language use in the United States while also examining the pedagogical implications of such information.  



ENG 346: Studies in Nineteenth-Century American Literature

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 11:00-11:50 AM

Professor: Ben Bascom

Hermits, wanderers, and other figures of solitude feature prominently in nineteenth-century American literature. From the writings of Henry David Thoreau and Emily Dickinson to invented characters by Washington Irving and Herman Melville, one can imagine a plenitude of lonely figures in the American nineteenth century. Indeed, the canonical Moby-Dick concludes (spoiler alert!) with Ishmael clutching onto an empty coffin, left adrift at sea as the last survivor of the decimated Pequod. In this course, we will trace a literary history of the lone figure in the nineteenth century as a way to explore the cultural value of artistic alienation. We will focus particularly on how the lonely figure has come to inform still-prevalent myths about writers and their modes of creativity. Our reading list may include works by Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Frederick Douglass, Fanny Fern, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Herman Melville, among others.



ENG 350: Teaching Writing in Secondary Schools

Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: Susanna Benko

ENG 350 is a course that explores different theories and practices of teaching writing.  Beginning with the assumption that writing is a critical part of English/Language Arts, this course is built on three foundational beliefs:

  • Writing can be taught and learned; teachers of English must make a focused effort to teach (not only assign) writing in secondary classrooms.
  • Teachers must prepare students to write for many purposes and audiences
  • English teachers can not only teach writing but also take up identities as writers.

This course concentrates on materials, methods, and resources used in teaching writing – including designing high quality writing assignments, scaffolding lessons, and designing assessments with a focus on rubrics in the English Language Arts classroom. Additional focuses of the course include technology and multimedia in practice and the teaching of grammar.  

This course is required for the teaching major in English/Language Arts.  Students must have completed all components of DP 2 and must meet the GPA requirement in order to enroll.  Contact the English Department at (765)285-8583 or english@bsu.edu for special permission for the course.

ENG 362: Medieval British Literature

Topic: Errant Knights & Daring Damsels
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 3:30-4:45 PM

Professor: Vanessa Rapatz

Quests, queens, dragons, sorcerers, and Saracens! The world of Medieval Romance is a far cry from what we now think of as the romance genre. While the heroes of Medieval or Chivalric Romance might strive to “get the girl,” they are more action adventure and fantasy than heart-warming Rom-Com. This course will centrally focus on the Medieval Romance tradition and Arthurian Legend as we interrogate gendered modes of chivalry and sovereignty. To this end, we will read works by authors including Marie de France, Geoffrey Chaucer, and Sir Thomas Malory. However, we will balance and broaden our perspective on medieval literature by reading romances in conjunction with texts including the mystic writings of Julian of Norwich and the spiritual accounts of Margery of Kempe; such writings subvert female norms of religious and domestic authority in ways that will complicate our thinking about the traditions we associate with Medieval British Literature.

ENG 395: Teaching Literature and Language in Secondary Schools

Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 3:30-4:45 PM

Professor: Pamela Hartman

English 395 explores various strategies and issues concerned in teaching language, literature, and visual literacy in the secondary English-language arts classroom.

This course is required for the teaching major in English/Language Arts.  Students must have completed all components of DP 2 and must meet the GPA requirement in order to enroll.  

ENG 400: Special Topics in English: Digital Literature Review

Issue #5: Imagining the Post-Apocalypse in Fiction and Film

Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM

Professor: Adam Beach

The genre of apocalyptic literature has long been associated with times of crisis and distress.  Perhaps one of the most important examples in the Western tradition, the Biblical Book of Revelation, was written as a response to the horrible persecution of early Christians in the Roman Empire.  Since that time, authors and film-makers have turned to imaginations of apocalypse, the end of the world, and life after the collapse of contemporary social structures to take on a host of questions and concerns.  Many of these questions are simply existential: what does human life mean in the absence of modern society?  What parts of human society and culture will remain after periods of catastrophe and collapse?  As we have learned more about the universe and as our own technology has advanced, we feel the fragility of our lives and our societies in a profound way.  The post-apocalyptic mode allows us to consider human life in the aftermath of nuclear war, an asteroid striking from space or other natural disasters, disease (caused by mutating viruses or genetically engineered variants), a catastrophic breakdown of our technology (like the electrical grid), and the exhaustion of the Earth’s environment and natural resources.  This anxious genre can also be used to explore other imaginary threats and fantasies such as invasion by zombies or extraterrestrial civilizations.

This course will allow students to explore cultural theories surrounding apocalypse and to craft a research project that will allow for in-depth study of key post-apocalyptic texts.  Along the way, we will consider these key questions: do post-apocalyptic fictions allow us to productively manage widespread cultural and social anxieties or are they partly responsible for a pervasive unease about the state of our civilization?  To what extent do these fictions represent a sort of dark wish for the destruction of our current state of life in postmodern capitalist societies and, perhaps, for a different or more authentic way of being human?  In what ways do authors use the post-apocalyptic mode to critique or support contemporary social, cultural, or political developments related to gender, race, sexuality, class, and technological development?

Students will carry out research over two semesters that will culminate in their capstone project in the Spring, a project that will be considered for publication in the fifth issue of the Digital Literature Review (DLR).  As part of the DLR team, students will also be responsible for contributing to and producing the DLR blog (www.bsudlr.wordpress.com), for designing and creating the fifth issue of the DLR (www.bsu.edu/dlr), and for publicizing and promoting our work as well as for soliciting and editing papers from undergraduate students around the globe. In addition to earning course credit and immersive learning experience, you will gain experience in research and scholarship, professional writing and editing, digital design and publishing, and/or emerging media and publicity.

While most students will earn 3 hours for ENG 400 in the Fall and 3 hours for ENG 444 in the

Spring, course credits are negotiable, and, if you are accepted into the course, I will work with you to fit the class into your program of study and to negotiate with your home department about course equivalencies.

If you are interested in joining the class, please contact Dr. Adam Beach (arbeach@bsu.edu) for more information.

ENG 400: Special Topics in English: Jacket Copy Creative: Event and Campaign Marketing

Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 3:30-4:45 PM

Professor: Eva Grouling Snider

Students in this immersive learning course will be responsible for planning and executing marketing campaigns for university events, clubs, and organizations. Students will primarily work with clients in the English Department—event organizers, faculty advisors for clubs, etc.—but we will also take on other university clients as appropriate. In addition to event promotion and marketing campaigns, students in this course will produce graphic designs for the English Department and other areas of the university.

Past events promoted by Jacket Copy Creative include the Marilyn K. Cory Speaker Series, Stars to Steer By, Lynda Barry, Marty McConnell, and Gary Younge. Previous marketing campaigns include a complete rebrand for Indiana Writing Project, a suite of branded documents for the Digital Writing Studio, grassroots marketing for a local documentary screening, and marketing for the Writers’ Community student club.

If you are a strong graphic designer, marketing copywriter, grassroots marketer, event coordinator, or project manager, you are encouraged to apply to join this section. This section of Jacket Copy Creative will be accompanied by a section of Jacket Copy Creative focused on managing the #bsuenglish digital community (including social media, blog, and e-newsletter). You are invited to apply to either section or both sections based on your skillset and the work you would like to participate in.

Please contact Eva Grouling Snider at esnider@bsu.edu to apply.

ENG 400: Special Topics in English: Jacket Copy Creative: #bsuenglish Community
Section 3: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12:00-12:50 PM
 
Professor: Eva Grouling Snider

Students in this immersive learning course will be responsible for managing the Ball State English Department’s digital community (#bsuenglish), especially social media, blog, and e-newsletter. Students will work together in teams and with the instructor to plan marketing strategies, create, curate, and edit content, conduct user research, discuss best practices and analytics, and make changes to our practices.

Students in this section will focus on writing and storytelling within a marketing context. If you are a strong copywriter, copyeditor, journalism/news writer, or social media manager, you are encouraged to apply to join this section. The #bsuenglish social media, blog, and e-newsletter will be the primary work of this section, but we will also take on one-time writing projects.
This section of Jacket Copy Creative will be accompanied by a section of Jacket Copy Creative focused on event promotion, campaign marketing, and graphic design. You are invited to apply to either section or both sections based on your skillset and the work you would like to participate in.
 
Please contact Eva Grouling Snider at esnider@bsu.edu to apply.


ENG 405: Special Topics in Creative Writing

Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 3:30-4:45 PM

Professor: Silas Hansen


This class will focus on fraudulent artifacts and appropriated forms—stories, essays, and poems that utilize the craft techniques, genre conventions, and structures of other types of writing: atlases, maps, Facebook profiles, syllabi, quizzes, Craigslist Missed Connections posts, Twitter feeds, etc. You will read a wide array of stories, essays, and poems (as well as work that blends and blurs the boundaries of genre) that fit this description, study them to figure out how they work, and then write your own choose-your-own-adventure poems or roommate ad essays or Ikea direction short stories. Assignments will include reading responses/quizzes, writing exercises, workshop submissions, peer responses, and a final portfolio of your work.
 
Possible texts include (1) Unfathomable City: A New Orleans Atlas by Rebecca Solnit, (2) Fakes: The Anthology of Pseudo-Interviews, Faux-Lectures, Quasi-Letters, “Found” Texts, and Other Fraudulent Artifacts ed. by David Shields and Matthew Vollmer, (3) Important Artifacts and Personal Property of Lenore Doolan and Harold Morris, Including Books, Street Fashion, and Jewelry by Leanne Shapton, (4) Michael Martone’s The Blue Guide to Indiana, and (5) Elena Passarello’s Animals Strike Curious Poses.



ENG 405: Special Topics in Creative Writing

Section 2: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 1:00-1:50 PM

Professor: Todd McKinney

This special topics course will be an examined study of writing lyrical prose. What is it? Why is it a useful mode of expression? What makes a text lyrical? How do we write lyrical prose? How does lyric prose manifest itself in different genres? Of course, behind each of those questions are a hundred others regarding the use of lyrical writing, and we will use this class to explore those and, I hope, find many more as we navigate the dissonant borders between nonfiction, poetry, and fiction, our lyres tuned (or not), readied to accompany our voices as we essay our songs and sing our stories, all the while walking down Main St. in our Dionysian clothes while making our gypsy noise and ignoring the onlookers’ glares. Or something like that.

Possible texts may include Bluets by Maggie Nelson, Citizen by Claudia Rankine, The Chronology of Water by Lidia Yuknavitch, The Emigrants by W.G. Sebald.

Assignments will include writing exercises, drafts of original work, critical responses, workshop critiques, and a final revision project.



ENG 406: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing

Section 1: Monday and Wednesday 6:30-7:45 PM

Professor: Silas Hansen

This advanced creative nonfiction writing class will build on the skills/knowledge from ENG 306 in order to ask--and answer--questions like, “What stories/ideas do I really need to tell/explore?” and “What is the best way to tell these stories/explore these ideas?” and “What kind of writer am I, really?”

We will read 5-6 books of creative nonfiction over the course of the semester (possible texts may include Joan Didion’s essay collection The White Album, Reyna Grande’s memoir The Distance Between Us, and John Jeremiah Sullivan’s collection of essays and criticism Pulphead) as well as numerous works published in literary journals and craft essays. Based on these readings, we will talk about what makes each writer’s voice distinctive, how they identify and approach their subject matter, and what it means to write, for example, “a Joan Didion essay.” Along the way, you will identify your own subject matter/questions and narrative position and develop a distinctive voice to make your essays your own.

Assignments will include reading responses/quizzes, short writing exercises, essay drafts/workshop submissions, workshop/peer review responses, craft analyses, and a portfolio of revised work.

ENG 406: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing

Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM

Professor: Jill Christman

Inspired by the insightful, brick-by-brick essay about essays co-written by Ana Maria Spagna and Steve Harvey in the September 2015 issue of Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Studies, this advanced creative nonfiction class will focus on the art of transforming lived experience and the observable world into essays. We’ll work on the nuts and bolts of the writing (as well as the lumber and the sheets of tin and the panes of glass. . .), considering the essay in parts:  the beginning and the end, full-blown scenes and elliptical reflections, white space and titles, allusions and dialogue, and of course, the echoes, patterns, and the connections that lead us to new meaning. As we read the brand-new Best American Essays 2016, and many individual essays, we’ll think about what it means to write something that matters, to write something that feels really true—and then we will practice.

Possible Texts: Best American Essays 2016 (ed. Jonathan Franzen, series ed. Robert Atwan); current issues of River Teeth and Brevity (online); & a large selection of must-read essays.



ENG 407: Advanced Fiction Writing

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 2:00-2:50 PM

Professor: Jeff Frawley

This section of Advanced Fiction will focus on alternate universes in literary fiction.  We’ll study how these alternate universes can be utilized in both realistic and non-realistic fiction, while exploring a range of styles and genres, including literary short fiction, revisionist fairy tales, tall tales, sci-fi, and dystopian fiction.  Rather than studying genre conventions, we’ll spend time discovering how alternate worlds can be used to explore “real-life” dramas and issues.  Students will complete several writing activities to craft their own unique fictional worlds.  The semester will culminate in the production of a final portfolio, including a substantial piece of fiction that contains or takes place in a purposeful alternate universe. Throughout the semester, small group workshops and conferences will be used to provide feedback on drafts and writing exercises.  This course will be both reading- and writing-intensive, and most meetings will include extensive discussions on readings.  

Possible texts may include:

The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka, Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro, Bloodchild by Octavia Butler, Kissing the Witch by Emma Donoghue, and Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino.

ENG 407: Advanced Fiction Writing

Section 2:  Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: Cathy Day

This is a novel-writing class, and thus, it will be very different from most of the creative writing classes you’ve taken previously. It’s a “writeshop,” not a workshop. Our concern is on the quantity of your writing, not the quality. We focus on your process, not the product. My hope is that this course will make you feel like a “real writer,” and that you’ll remember what you learned about maintaining a writing life long after the course is over. By the end of the semester, you’ll have drafted many, many pages of a brand new novel-in-progress. Of the many words you produce, 10 will be revised and turned in as your final, along with an accompanying query letter to a faux literary agent.

ENG 408: Advanced Poetry Writing

Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM

Professor: Katy Didden

Advanced Poetry will begin with basic questions such as: What is poetry? How do we shape poems out of our emotions, ideas, and experiences?  What is the use of poetic devices such as rhyme, meter, and figurative language?   We will also work with a combination of assignments and exercises suitable for advanced writers that will help you develop an ear for rhyme and rhythm, build your vocabulary, and above all, learn how to read other writers with great attention.  These assignments will introduce you to a variety of trends in contemporary poetry, but we will also trace these trends back to longstanding poetic traditions.

For the first half of the semester, our assignments will correspond to class readings (either from our textbook, or from any one of the contemporary collections we will be reading together). For the second half of the semester, you will have more autonomy, as you study the work of a model poet over the course of several weeks.  In this “poetry apprenticeship,” you will engage in a deep dialogue with that poet, and immerse yourself in poetry techniques.  Students will write several response papers, offer thorough critiques on the work of their peers, and submit a portfolio of poems this semester. Students will also give a presentation in which they introduce the work of their model poet to the class.



ENG 410: Advanced Screenwriting

Section 1: Wednesday 6:30-9:10 PM

Professor: Rani Crowe

English 410 is an advanced workshop in screenwriting.  Students will complete 2 short individual screenplays of approximately 10-15 pages each, and one group-written screenplay of 8-12 pages for potential BSU CEI film production. Students will complete screenwriting exercises, view films, read screenplays and other craft related readings.  

Building on concepts developed in English 310, emphasis in this class will be given to more advanced work in Structure, Dialogue, Character Development, Outlining, Workshopping, Revision, and Pitching a Screenplay.



ENG 410: Advanced Screenwriting

Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45 PM

Professor: Matt Mullins

English 410 is an advanced workshop in the theory and practice of screenwriting.  As such, students in this course will write and workshop (i.e., have collectively critiqued) two complete, short screenplays of approximately 10-20 pages each. In addition, they will be asked to complete various screenwriting and script development exercises, view films, and read material related to the craft of screenwriting.  The bulk of this course will focus on the workshopping and collective critique of complete short student screenplays, discussion of screenwriting techniques, and the reading and analysis of professionally-written screenplays and screenplay excerpts considered from the perspective of craft. Though we will look at examples of professionally written feature-length scripts and discuss how episodic and feature-length story structures work, our focus in this class will be on the writing of complete short scripts.



ENG 412: Reading Printed Materials in the English Classroom

Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM

Professor: Pamela Hartman

Readers today face the difficult challenge of choosing between and making sense of numerous competing texts, in many different forms.   In this course we will investigate theories concerning both what we should read as well as how these texts should be read.  We will also look at our beliefs concerning the very nature of literature and literacy.  For instance, we will consider such questions as the following:  What is literacy?  How is it acquired?  Is there a difference between print literacy and multimedia literacy?  How do broader contexts, such as family and community, affect our literacy or literacies?  While this is not a course in teaching methods, we will develop practical suggestions for decoding, analyzing, and interpreting texts, including literary and popular materials frequently used in the English Language Arts classroom.  Open to all majors who have an interest in exploring these issues.



ENG 414: Young Adult Literature

Section 1: Tuesday 6:30-9:10 PM

Professor: Susanna Benko

In his description about writing for a young adult audience, Sherman Alexie explains,

I write books for teenagers because I vividly remember what it felt like to be a teen facing every day and epic dangers. I don’t write to protect them. It’s far too late for that. I write to give them weapons–in the form of words and ideas-that will help them fight their monsters. I write in blood because I remember what it felt like to bleed.

This course is designed to engage students in reading, discussing, and thinking critically about literature written for adolescents or young adults – especially about literature for young adults that handles adult issues.  We will read roughly one YA text per week (~12-13 novels throughout the semester) and will also a variety of texts about the genre, including scholarly (e.g., from peer reviewed journals) and popular (e.g., blogs from authors).  Although this is not a course about teaching young adult literature, we will also consider pedagogical approaches to these texts and the role of these texts in middle and secondary schools.

This course is open to all majors. There are opportunities within the course for students to self-select some texts and to take ownership of their assignments.  In general, assignments in this course are designed to immerse students in the genre of YA literature and provide opportunities to read, write, and talk about important questions and topics within this area.  

ENG 425: Film Studies

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 10:00-10:50 AM

Lab: Monday 4:00-6:00 PM

Professor: Matt Hartman

This course is an introduction to the study of film.  We will examine the formal elements of film (mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, sound, and narrative), with an emphasis on analyzing film critically.  We will also explore the social contexts of film, considering films as complex cultural texts. Our goal is to make the invisible visible, to see and think about things you may not have noticed in movies before.  In addition, the course will expose you to a variety of great films in different styles and genres, hopefully broadening your appreciation for film and introducing you to film history.  Assignments will include short analytic writings, two papers, and a final exam.

ENG 425: Film Studies

Section 2: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM

Lab: Wednesday 4:00-6:00 PM

Professor:  Sreyoshi Sarkar

In this course, we will learn how to analyze films as cultural texts. We will engage with commercial cinema, art films, and documentaries from India, Kenya, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Japan, the U.S., Europe, and Latin America, in order to study:
1.     How the technical aspects of film making, e.g., camera angles, color, sound, music, lighting, spatial organization, and editing, work with the basic plotline and genre of the film to narrate a complex story.
2.     Key traditions and movements in film history; important film industries around the world and how they represent the nation.
3.     How to deep read and write about films as creative-critical responses that complicate and challenge ideologies of nationhood, gender politics, and environmental violence.
We will also look at audience reception, film theory, and the financial aspects of film making - publicity, distribution, and collection at the box office - for a more nuanced understanding of films as material-cultural texts that circulate across the world in different ways. Assignments will include short response papers, group presentations, and one research paper, as well as other in-class discussion and writing activities.
 



ENG 430: Document Design and Visual Rhetoric

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 11:00-11:50 AM

Professor: Eva Grouling Snider

In this course, we will explore visual rhetoric, or how we as human beings use visual language to communicate, to persuade, to inform. We will begin by discussing theories of visual rhetoric, then move into instruction in the technologies and processes designers and professional writers often use to design documents. From there, we will examine general principles of document design, as well as specific principles, including color, space, and typography. The course wraps up with a client project and a portfolio collecting designs you have produced throughout the semester.

This class is well suited for all students interested in becoming better visual communicators and document designers. It draws on principles common in art, graphic and information design, and professional writing.

While you will be completing readings and analysis assignments, this course is a production course, meaning the primary focus will be on the documents you design. You will be doing a significant amount of work sketching, wireframing, prototyping, providing feedback, and revising visual documents.



ENG 436: Theory and Research in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 12:00-12:50 PM

Professor: Megumi Hamada

This course introduces theory and research in teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL), by examining linguistic, psychological, sociocultural, and sociopolitical factors in second language learning. The overall objective of this course is to provide a foundational understanding of second language learning for a future teaching career.



ENG 437: Methods and Materials in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 8:00-10:30 AM

Professor: Lynne Stallings

The aim of this course is to prepare future teachers of K-12 students to understand, recognize and address the language acquisition challenges of non-native English speakers, either in the U.S. or abroad.  Students will receive hands-on experience in local schools, familiarizing themselves with the standards for English learners, while they develop and use practical techniques and materials to teach English learners based on second-language acquisition principles.  Students will also consider and develop strategies that help English learners acquire the language, academic, and social skills they need in order to become fully participating members of their schools and communities.  



ENG 444: Senior Seminar

Topic:  Freedom of Speech in the 21st Century
Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:15 PM

Professor: Mike Donnelly

“Freedom of Speech” is a major element of the cultural context in which we live, think, work, and write.  Indeed, it is often understood, in U.S. cultural and political discourse, as the cornerstone of democracy. In popular discussion, this relationship is typically framed as a simple contest between liberal champions of free speech and the conservative forces of censorship. But the issue is a great deal more complex, rooted in a web of cultural assumptions and social norms. Now, perhaps more than ever before, the question of “free speech” should concern us all, particularly those who love and teach in English Studies (rhetoric, literature, and writing), or who aspire to be writers themselves.

In this course, we will explore definitions of freedom of speech and their various relationships to life in a democratic society, the arts and literature, and public discourse. We will read and discuss both scholarly and popular treatments of free speech, as well as great works of literature, from critical, aesthetic, and rhetorical perspectives. Each student will propose and create their own semester-long research project, in accordance with their specific area of interest.

ENG 444: Senior Seminar

Topic: American Bestsellers  
Section 2: Monday and Wednesday 3:00-4:15 PM

Professor: Debbie Mix

American Bestsellers - What makes a book a bestseller? What can reading bestsellers tell us about a particular cultural moment? What kind of afterlife does a bestseller have? We will read a variety of American bestsellers--from early texts like Michael Wigglesworth’s “Day of Doom” (1662) and Susanna Rowson’s Charlotte Temple (1791) to nineteenth-century successes like Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852) and Horatio Alger’s Ragged Dick (1868) to mid-twentieth-century favorites like Grace Metalious’s Peyton Place (1956) and Mary McCarthy’s The Group (1963) to hot-off-the-press contemporary bestsellers. We’ll also consider theories of taste, popularity, and the middlebrow as we seek to understand the distinctions (if there are any) between the “literary” and the “popular.” While most of our attention will be focused on novels, we’ll also consider some other bestsellers in poetry and nonfiction. In addition to completing a major research-driven project and a reflective essay, students will also read and research bestselling texts and present their findings to the class.

ENG 444: Senior Seminar

Topic: Rhetorics of Social Justice
Section 3: Tuesday and Thursday 9:30-10:45 AM

Professor:G Patterson

In this seminar, we will explore contemporary U.S. social justice movements that work at the intersections of race, class, gender, citizenship, sexuality, and gender identity. Drawing from a range of interdisciplinary scholars, like Michael Zweig and Dean Spade, we will examine the strategies different rhetors have used to forward racial, economic, sexual, and trans justice (among other projects). Throughout the semester, we will examine the complexities of articulating justice in the post-postmodern age, the pitfalls of wedge-issue politics, and the potential for coalition building among various communities. 


 



ENG 464: Shakespeare

Topic: “Something Wicked This Way Comes[?]”: Supernatural Shakespeare

Section 1: Tuesday and Thursday 5:00-6:15 PM

Professor: Vanessa Rapatz

Ghosts, Spirits, Witches, and Monsters pervade a select number of Shakespeare’s plays. Loosely based on such supernatural themes, this course studies seven plays that span Shakespeare’s career. We will read one comedy, Midsummer Night’s Dream; three tragedies, Macbeth, Hamlet, Richard III (also a history play); and three late romances, Cymbeline, The Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest. Class lectures and discussions will attend to the language and formal conventions of these plays as well as to their stagecraft, their historical context, and their modern reception. We will also be considering modern adaptations of the plays, including the Netflix series House of Cards (originally a British series) that clearly conflates Richard III and Macbeth in its representation of American Politics.



ENG 489: Practicum in Literary Editing and Publishing

Section 1: Monday and Wednesday 5:00-6:15 PM

Professor: Mark Neely

The students in this class will be responsible for producing the Spring 2018 issue of The Broken Plate, a national literary magazine produced by Ball State undergraduates. Student editors will be responsible for all aspects of magazine production, including soliciting submissions, selecting quality work, designing the magazine, and promoting and selling the issue.

Other requirements include magazine and book reviews, readings and quizzes, software tutorials, and an individual literary editing project. Texts will include books by our fall visiting writers, online readings, and handouts.

English 489 is a year-long, 6-credit, immersive learning course.  Students will also enroll in English 489 in Spring 2018.

Please email Mark Neely (maneely@bsu.edu) to request permission to enroll in this course.

ENG 490: Literature and Gender

Topic: Unreliable Women
Section 1: Thursdays 6:30-9:10 PM

Professor: Molly Ferguson

Due to the recent popularity of books (and films) like Gone Girl and The Girl on the Train, the image of the unreliable narrator in your mind may likely have a woman’s face attached to it. A stereotypical view of women is that they are emotional rather than rational, inconsistent rather than steady, and that they think in a circular rather than linear way. This notion paves the way for the idea that women are not to be trusted, or further still, that their word in a court of law is less reliable than a man’s. With that negative judgment in mind, we will read works of literature that feature women characters as unreliable narrators, who may or may not be telling us the whole story. Using our primary texts and some secondary readings, the course probes the following questions:

  • are ALL narrators unreliable?
  • what types of unreliability are there, and how are they signaled in narrative?
  • is unreliability gendered?
  • can unreliability can be recuperated for women as a strategy of withholding that gives them agency?
  • do male and female writers characterize women’s unreliability differently?

We will read about several types of unreliable women: madwomen, alcoholics, children, criminals, and liars. Your own response to these narrators will be shaped by the author’s narrative techniques, as well as your ability to read “between the lines” at what is not being said in the texts. Course work will include a close-reading paper, group work, a presentation, and a longer paper.

ENG 493: American Ethnic Literature

Section 1: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 9:00-9:50 AM

Professor: Allison Layfield


This course is an intensive study of African American, Native American, Asian American and Latino/a noir literature.  If you’ve ever seen an old detective movie in which the gangster comes out of the shadows, a woman visits a private eye for help, or a criminal turns detective to clear his name, you are familiar with the genre of noir, which has become a quintessentially American art form. In this class we will explore the traditional themes of noir literature—social anxieties about identity, fate, gender, economic class, sexuality and race—as well as the multiethnic roots of this American tradition. Students interested in this course can expect to read “R-rated” novels and challenging theoretical essays, as well as literary criticism. Fiction may include the work of Chang Rae Lee, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Danzy Senna, Thulani Davis, Isabel Allende, Lucha Corpi, Tananarive Due, Louise Erdrich, or Sherman Alexie.