Student Annual Review and Remediation

Student Annual Review

School psychology faculty meet annually (spring semester) to review all students in the doctoral program. Students’ progress in the program are assessed consistent with the program’s five goals. Core faculty members discuss student performance in required courses, as well as information from practicum supervisors and departmental faculty concerning performance and professional work characteristics in contexts related to completed coursework, practicum, and assistantships. Departmental faculty who are assigned a school psychology student as a graduate assistant also are asked to evaluate the student’s work performance. In addition, all faculty chairing a doctoral committee of a school psychology student are asked to update the school psychology core faculty regarding the student’s progress in the program (e.g., timelines for completing the Plan of Study, the comprehensive exams, and the doctoral dissertation).

Based upon the aforementioned information, the school psychology core complete three rubrics of student progress. The first rubric (PhD Program Goals Rubric) assesses students’ progress related to the program’s five goals over the past year. This rubric was recently developed and has only been used in 2010 and 2011. This rubric is completed each year (up to five years) the student is in the doctoral program. The second rubric (Program Disposition Assessment) assesses students’ professional disposition in areas of engagement, responsibility, motivation, ethics, respect, flexibility, and diversity over the past year while the student is on campus and completing the prepracticum and practicum. The third rubric (BSU Disposition Assessment Rubric) is required by Ball State and is completed once while a student is in the doctoral program—typically at decision point 3 of rGrade (after proposal but before internship). In addition, students’ completion of program requirements (e.g., Doctoral Committee, Plan of Study, Comprehensive Exams, Dissertation Proposal, Dissertation) also are reviewed. The rubric assessments are entered into rGrade for students to access and review. In addition, each student receives a letter indicating the annual review has been conducted by the school psychology core faculty. The letter provides a brief overview of the ratings, outlines achievements, and identifies program requirements that still need to be completed (if needed). In addition, if the school psychology core identify areas in need of improvement or remediation, they are included in the letter. The co-director (David McIntosh) is responsible for writing the letters within two weeks after the annual review. A copy of the letter will be placed each student’s permanent file and students will be provided with a copy of the letter. Barbara Rothlisberg (co-director) is responsible for entering the ratings into rGrade within two weeks after the annual review.

Remediation

Typically, students will be referred to the co-director (David McIntosh) or a core faculty member to discuss areas identified by faculty that need to be addressed. The majority of issues identified by the school psychology core faculty are related to completing program requirements. Therefore, students are often requested to meet specific timelines related to developing a committee, developing a Plan of Study, completing comprehensive exams, completing the dissertation proposal, or completing the doctoral dissertation.

When program faculty identify areas related to professional disposition that need to be addressed, students are often asked to meet with the co-director (David McIntosh), their academic advisor, and/or a core member. The majority of these discussions are conducted informally with the goal of sharing core faculty views related to how students can make improvements over the course of the next year.

When school psychology faculty identify areas that require remediation, students are notified in the annual letter to meet with the co-director (David McIntosh), their faculty advisor, a core faculty member, and/or course instructor to develop a remediation plan. Usually, a remediation plan is needed when attempts by the practicum supervisor/coordinator, internship supervisor, or course instructor have not been successful in addressing the areas of concern. The most common areas that have required a remediation plan have been completing psychological evaluations in a timely manner, completing practicum requirements, not completing course requirements, or demonstrating competencies in specific clinical skills (e.g., diagnostic interviewing skills, assessment skills, consultation skills). Typically, if students are having difficulties completing the requirements of a specific course, the instructor of the course will be involved in meeting with the student and developing a remediation plan. The remediation will include clearly identified objectives, a clear time-line for completing the objectives, and behaviorally anchored assessments. The remediation plan also will include the consequences when the inadequacies identified by the core faculty are not rectified. In addition, all remediation programs will be positively stated. The remediation plan is developed with input and in collaboration with the student. The primary focus of remediation plans is to help identify the most appropriate methods to help the student, complete program requirements, obtain competencies, and be successful in the program. If the student disagrees with the remediation plan, the student can request in writing that the school psychology core faculty review the plan and assist in the development of the remediation plan. If a student disagrees with the need for a remediation plan, he or she can follow the due process procedures of the program and university. Complete procedures are available below in the Student Review and Retention Policy of the School Psychology Programs and Student Review, Due Process, and Grievance Policy. A copy of the agreed-to remediation plan is placed in the student’s file.

Remediation Plans Not Related to the Yearly Annual Review

At times, a remediation plan may be required during the year not related to the yearly annual review. A school psychology core faculty member, faculty member from the department, a practicum supervisor, or internship supervisor may raise an issue related to a specific student’s performance or professional disposition at any time during the year. When this occurs and the school psychology core determines a remediation plan is warranted without waiting for the yearly annual review, the student is notified in a letter to meet with the co-director (David McIntosh), their faculty advisor, a core faculty member, and/or course instructor to develop a remediation plan. Usually, a remediation plan is needed when attempts by the practicum supervisor, internship supervisor, or course instructor have not been successful in addressing areas of concern. The most common areas that have required a remediation plan have been completing psychological evaluations in a timely manner, completing practicum requirements, not completing course requirements, demonstrating competencies in clinical skills (e.g., diagnostic interviewing skills, assessment skills, consultation skills). Typically, if students are having difficulties completing the requirements of a specific course, the instructor of the course will be involved in meeting with the student and developing a remediation plan. The remediation will include clearly identified objectives, a clear time-line for completing the objectives, and behaviorally anchored assessments. The remediation plan also will include the consequences of not rectifying the inadequacies identified by the school core. In addition, all remediation programs will be positively stated. The remediation plan will be developed with input and in collaboration with the student. The primary focus of remediation plans are to help identify the most appropriate methods to help students, complete program requirements, obtain competencies, and be successful in the program. If the student disagrees with the remediation plan, the student can request in writing that the school psychology core faculty review the plan and assist in the development of the remediation plan. If a student disagrees with the need for a remediation plan, he or she can follow the due process procedures. Complete procedures are available below in the Student Review and Retention Policy of the School Psychology programs and Student Review, Due Process, and Grievance Policy. A copy of the remediation plan will be placed in the student’s file.