One of the requirements for the Writing Proficiency Exam (WPP392) is that you use specific examples and details from the article to support your reasoning. This means you are expected to incorporate material from your article correctly according to the rules of a specific citation style.

You do not need to write an end citation for the article—it is assumed you could do that, but it is not necessary for this exam. However, any in-text citation from the article you are using should be done correctly.

For the kind of essay you are being asked to write, one of the following citation styles is appropriate.

You need to stay with one style throughout your exam--don't change styles within the essay. Also, be consistent in the way you incorporate and punctuate direct quotations, summaries, and/or paraphrases of text from the article.

Scroll down to a style below to see how you need to cite your first directly-quoted, in-text entry and any directly-quoted entries that follow. For other kinds of entries, check a reliable and up-to-date reference source.

All citations are from an article by Peter Tragos called “Monster Masculinity: Honey, I’ll be In the Garage Reasserting My Manhood” which was published in The Journal of Popular Culture in 2009 and runs from page 541-553. The version we have given you, however, is an online version that does not include page numbers, so you won't need to add the page numbers within the in-text citations because your web version does not show them:

MLA:

Author named in a signal phrase:
According to John Tragos, “Contemporary gender roles have new expectations."

No author named in a signal phrase:
According to one writer, “Contemporary gender roles have new expectations” (Tragos).

Author named with quoted material run into the text:
Tragos suggests that “contemporary gender roles have new expectations." 

No author named with quoted material run into the text:
One writer suggests that “contemporary gender roles have new expectations” (Tragos).

APA:

Unlike MLA, uses the paragraph number to help the reader locate the quoted material. In my version of the text, the quoted material comes from paragraph 15.

Author named in a signal phrase:
J.Tragos (2009) noted, “Contemporary gender roles have new expectations” (para. 15).

No Author named in a signal phrase:
One writer noted, “Contemporary gender roles have new expectations” (Tragos, 2009, para. 15).

Author named with quoted material run into the text:
J.Tragos (2009) suggested that “contemporary gender roles have new expectations” (para. 15).

No author named with quoted material run into the text:
One writer suggested that “contemporary gender roles have new expectations” (Tragos, 2009, para. 15).
 

CMS using Author-Date references:

 Author named in a signal phrase—first entry:
John Tragos (2009) notes, “Contemporary gender roles have new expectations."

 No Author named in a signal phrase:
One writer noted, “Contemporary gender roles have new expectations” (Tragos 2009).

 Author named with quoted material run into the text:
John Tragos (2009) suggests that “contemporary gender roles have new expectations."

 No author named with quoted material run into the text:
One writer suggested that “contemporary gender roles have new expectations” (Tragos 2009).