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Accreditation

Our bachelor’s and master’s degree programs are fully accredited.

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As the only accredited urban planning program in Indiana, we will teach you the skills you need to excel in the industry. Our supportive, expert faculty advance the latest theories and approaches through a blend of relevant classroom instruction paired with internships, field trips, and hands-on partnerships.

We offer the following programs:

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Faculty share their expertise, passion, and course offerings.

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Collaborate with community partners and faculty in innovative spaces.

Our History

Ball State established the College of Architecture and Planning in 1965 and began offering a graduate urban planning program in the 1970s. The first master of urban and regional planning degree was awarded in 1977.

At this time, Ball State’s College of Science and Humanities offered an undergraduate major in urban and regional studies. In 1982, the URS program was transferred to CAP, and work began on designing an undergraduate professional degree program.

Once CAP developed the bachelor of urban planning and development, the university phased out the URS program. In fall 1986, three students entered the bachelor’s of urban planning program, and in 1990, the program’s first students graduated.

A year later in 1991, 34 master’s degree students graduated, and in 2001, our accelerated track opened to graduates with accredited degrees.

Combined, more than 650 students have graduated from our degree programs. Our impact is strongest right here in the Hoosier state, but we have alumni from California to Maryland and from North Dakota to Florida. China, Africa, Sri Lanka, and Saudi Arabia are home to other graduates.

Rankings and Recognitions

The “Planetizen Guide to Graduate Urban Planning Programs 2014” rated our Master of Urban and Regional Planning program eighth in the Midwest, up two spots from our 2012 ranking. Our MURP program ranked seventh nationally among schools without a PhD program and seventh for small programs (those with an annual cohort of 25 or fewer students).