Undergraduate Course Catalog

Nutrition and Health Science

R. Brey, Chairperson

The Department of Nutrition and Health Science offers a variety of programs in allied health science, basic science, health promotion, and disease prevention. Program emphases include health education and promotion, school health education (leading to grades 7-12 certification), public health, radiography, and respiratory therapy. The latter two programs are offered in cooperation with IU Health in Indianapolis. Interested students should contact the Department of Nutrition and Health Science to obtain a copy of the desired admission and retention policy and plan of study. In addition, the department houses the national office of Eta Sigma Gamma, the health education honorary.

ASSOCIATE DEGREE

The Associate degree program prepares students for careers in radiography. Radiographers are highly skilled professionals qualified by education to perform x-ray procedures to assist in diagnosing and treating medical conditions. The prerequisite phase of the program takes place on the Ball State campus. The professional concentration phase is offered in Indianapolis, where medical, technical, and clinical courses are taught at IU Health Methodist Hospital and other clinical education sites. There are specific admission and retention requirements for the radiography program. Interested students should contact the Department of Nutrition and Health Science for more information.

General Information

  • Students may complete the required radiography prerequisite courses upon admission to the university. Admission to the professional concentration phase requires a separate application and is competitive. Admission to the university, satisfactory completion of the radiography prerequisite courses and fulfillment of program admission requirements does not guarantee admission to the professional concentration phase of the program. The radiography program designates the number of students admitted to the professional concentration phase each year.
  • Applicants to the professional concentration phase must disclose any termination from a health care facility, ticket, citation, summons, arrest, charge, or conviction for a misdemeanor or felony. Individuals who have been charged or convicted of a misdemeanor or felony must preapply and receive clearance from the national certifying body by the professional concentration program application deadline.
  • All accepted students to the professional concentration phase of the program must provide documentation of CPR and required immunization/tests and successfully complete a background check and mandatory drug testing performed by IU Health.
  • In order to participate in the professional concentration phase of the program, no accepted student may appear on specific Federal exclusion lists.

BACHELOR’S DEGREES

Two of the bachelor degree programs prepare students for careers as health educators. The major in health education and promotion prepares students to serve as health educators in community health settings that include, but are not limited to, governmental health agencies, community health agencies, clinical health settings, and in businesses and industries. In addition to the course work required in this major, students must also complete a semester-long internship.

The teaching major in health and physical education prepares students to serve as health and physical educators in middle and high school settings. In addition to the course work required in the major, students must complete the professional education course sequence and teacher education requirements, including a student teaching experience.

The third bachelor degree program prepares students for careers in respiratory therapy. Respiratory therapists help diagnose, treat, rehabilitate, and educate to prevent and manage cardiopulmonary diseases. They are skilled in airway maintenance, procurement and analysis of arterial blood gas samples, and performance of pulmonary function tests. Students may enter the general studies portion of the program upon admission to the university; however, admission to the program is competitive, and admission to the university does not guarantee acceptance to the professional studies/clinical phase of the program. The professional studies courses are taught at IU Health in Indianapolis. Students may apply for admission to the professional studies/clinical portion of this program when the following requirements are met: 28 credits of the required courses are completed; 10 of these completed credits are in the required math/science courses; all math/science courses must be completed with a grade of C or higher; 2.5 overall GPA; completion and documentation of at least three hours of clinical observation. Accepted students must provide documentation of CPR and required immunizations/tests. Once accepted, each must successfully complete a background check and mandatory drug testing performed by IU Health. Accepted students must not appear on specific Federal exclusion lists. Failing any of these requirements would make the applicant ineligible for the professional studies portion of the program.

Dietetics/Pre-Dietetics (four-year program). The Didactic Program in Dietetics prepares students for careers that maximize health through nutrition. The program provides academic preparation for a career as a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN). An RDN provides nutrition care in many settings, such as medical centers, community health programs, schools, athletic teams, and may also work in the foodservice or pharmaceutical industries. The program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Graduates of the program are required to complete an ACEND-accredited Dietetic Internship post-graduation, and prior to the Registration Examination for Dietitians.


ASSOCIATE DEGREE 

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE—RADIOGRAPHY (AS), 64 credits 

PREFIX

NO

SHORT TITLE

CREDITS

General education, 28 credits   

ANAT
CHEM
COMM
CS
ENG
MATH
PHYC
PHYS
PSYS
PFW

201
100
210
104
103
125
100
205
100

Fundamentals of Human Anatomy
People and Chemistry
Fundamentals of Public Comm
Introduction to Computers
Rhetoric and Writing
Mathematics Applications
Conceptual Physics
Fund of Hum Phys
Intro to Psychological Science

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1




28 crs
Professional concentration area, 36 credits   

AHSC

 

201
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234

Introduction to Patient Care
Radiographic Procedures 1
Radiographic Procedures 2
Radiographic Procedures 3
Computed Tomography
Radiographic Principles 1
Radiographic Principles 2
Radiographic Principles 3
Clinic 1 Radiography
Clinic 2 Radiography
Clinic 3 Radiography
Clinic 4 Radiography

2
3
4
2
1
2
3
3
2
5
5
4





36 crs




64 crs
Students qualifying for exemption from ENG 103 will receive credit for the course. ENG 101 and 102 may be substituted for ENG 103. 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREES 

Students will be guided by the outline of baccalaureate degrees, the University Core Curriculum, and the concentration areas listed below. 

MAJOR IN HEALTH EDUCATION AND PROMOTION (BA/BS), 69 credits 

PREFIX

NO

SHORT TITLE

CREDITS

ANAT
HSC















PHYS

201
160
180
200
210
220
301
302
310
344
387
388
479
482
487
494
495
205

Fundamentals of Human Anatomy
Fundamentals of Human Health
Principles of Community Health
Intro to Hlth Ed and Promotion
Health Behavior Theories
Pop Race Cult in Hlth Promtn
Prog Plan in Hlth Promotion 1
Prog Plan in Hlth Promotion 2
Healthcare Systems
Disease Mgt in Hlth Promotion
Quant Mthds and Epid Hlth Pro
Org Admin in Hlth Promotion
Internship
Environmental Health
Applied Res Writ Eval Hlth Pro
Health Communication
Prof Prep in Hlth Promotion
Fund of Hum Phys

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6
3
3
3
3
3

3 credits from    

CPSY
EDPS
GERO
HSC



MKG
NREM
POLS

PSYS
SOC

230
430
440
365
372
462
468
310
309
342
347
324
424
431

Human Relation Development (3)
Mental Health (3)
Women and Aging (3)
Health and Aging (3)
Women and Health (3)
Hlth Prmtn in the Worksite (3)
Consumer Health Issues (3)
Consumer Behavior (3)
Human Dimensions Global Change (3)
Problems in Public Policy (3)
Environmental Law and Policy (3)
Psychology of Women (3)
Family (3)
Aging and the Life Course (3)

3

3 credits from    
ANTH

CPSY
EDMU
FCFC
NREM
PSYS
SOC


WGS
311
427
470
206
202
357
424
320
328
421
220
Ethnicity and Race (3)
Culture and Medicine (3)
Cross-Cult Counseling (3)
Adv Ethnic Multicul Grp Beh (3)
Child and Family Wellness (3)
Internat Community Development (3)
Psychology of Diversity (3)
Social Inequality (3)
Global and the Social World (3)
Racial and Cultural Minor US (3)
International Womens Issues (3)
3

3 credits from
   

BIO
CPSY
EDPS


FCFN


HSC




PSYS

313
360
350
351
355
240
275
340
261
371
381
464
467
301
377

Microbiology (4)
Aspects of Sexuality (3)
Child Psychology (3)
Adolescent Psychology (3)
Adult Psychology (3)
Nutrition for Educators (3)
Personal Nutrition (3)
Prin of Human Nutrition (3)
Health, Sex, and Family Life (3)
Death and Dying (3)
Stress Management (3)
Hlth Ed in the Clinical Sttng (3)
Drug Dependency and Abuse (3)
Health Psychology (3)
Psychology of Sexual Behavior (3)

 




3

3 credits from    
CPSY

ECON
EMHS

FCFC

NREM
SOC

TDPT

400
420
348
350
351
450
484
347
341
433
301
360
Fundamentals of Counseling (3)
Psychological Interventions (3)
Health and Economics (3)
Haz Mat Health and Safety (3)
Intro Emergency Management (3)
Consumer Education (3)
Family Stressors and Crises (3)
Occupational Indust Hygiene (3)
Sociology of Hlth and Illness (3)
Sociology of Mental Health (3)
Develop Manage S and H Prog (3)
Industrial Safety and Health (3)
3




69 crs
Students are responsible for all elective courses.

MAJOR IN PRE-DIETETICS/DIETETICS (BA/BS), 92 credits

The Department of Nutrition and Health Science offers a baccalaureate degree in dietetics that is fully accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. To pursue this program, students must have sufficient mathematical preparation to meet the prerequisite for required chemistry courses (two years of high school algebra or successful completion of MATH 108). Students pursuing a baccalaureate degree in dietetics must begin their academic career as a pre-dietetics major. Students will apply into the dietetics major in the spring semester of the second year, or as required courses are completed. Please refer to the Dietetics Program Director for full program requirements and program admission criteria.
PREFIX NO SHORT TITLE CREDITS
Common core, 6 credits
 
FCS

103
403
FCS Body of Knowledge
FCS in Practice
3
3
Pre-dietetics core, 37 credits
 
ANAT
CHEM



FCFN


PHYS
PSYS

201
111
112
231
360
101
110
340
215
100
241
Fundamentals of Human Anatomy
General Chemistry 1
General Chemistry 2
Organic Chemistry 1
Essentials of Biochemistry
Introduction to Dietetics
Prin Food Prep and Food Serv
Prin of Human Nutrition
Human Physiology
Intro to Psychological Science
Statistics
3
4
4
4
4
1
3
3
5
3
3
Dietetics courses, 49 credits
 
BIO
FCFN












MGT
113
147
220
345
346
350
363
395
396
400
446
447
455
456
300
Microbiology for Health Sci
Foodservice Sanitation
Meal Design and Presentation
Macronutrients
Micronutrients and Phytochem
Technology of Food Science
Admin of Food and Nutr Systems
Food and Culture
Nutrition Counseling Practicum
Restaurant Management
Medical Nutrition Therapy 1
Medical Nutrition Therapy 2
Lifecycle Nutrition
Community Nutrition
Managing Behavior in Org
5
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
FCFN Elective
3
      92 crs

MAJOR IN RESPIRATORY THERAPY (BA/BS), 107 credits  

Admission and retention requirements
  • Completion of 28 credits of course work.
  • 10 of the 28 credits of course work must be in math/science courses required for the program.    
  • Grade of C or better in the required math/science courses.    
  • Minimum overall grade-point average of 2.5.    
  • Minimum grade of C in each professional course.    
  • Program graduates must pass a series of three national examinations, the first of which is also required for licensure as a Respiratory Care Practitioner in Indiana.    
  • All prerequisite course work must be completed by August 1 if a student is admitted into the clinical phase of the program.   
  • A student who has been dismissed from the program may not apply for readmission. Under special circumstances, a waiver may be requested by the program faculty and forwarded to the department chairperson for action.

PREFIX

NO

SHORT TITLE

CREDITS

Foundation courses   

CHEM
HSC
PHIL
PHYC
PSYS

101
160
202
110
100

Gen, Org, Biochem and Hlth Sci
Fundamentals of Human Health
Ethics
General Physics 1
Intro to Psychological Science

5
3
3
4
3




18 crs
Required prerequisites   

ANAT
BIO
MATH
PHYS
PSYS

201
113
111
215
241

Fundamentals of Human Anatomy 
Microbiology for Health Sci 
Pre-Calculus Algebra 
Human Physiology
Statistics

3
5
3
5
3




19 crs
Required AHSC courses, 70 credits   

AHSC

 

 

303
311
315
325
326
333
350
355
356
371
385
395
405
420
430
440
444
445
451
456
461
480
485

Intro Hum Diseases Resp Thrpst
Cardiorespiratory Physiology
Cardio Assmnt and Patient Care
General Respiratory Care
Respiratory Care Techniques 1
Cardio Pharmacology 1
Cardiorespiratory Diseases
Life Support
Respiratory Care Techniques 2
Pulmonary Diagnostics
Respiratory Care Practicum 1
Respiratory Care Practicum 2
Neonatal - Pediatric Resp Care
Intro Res in Respiratory Care
Mgt and Leadership Resp Care
Advanced Cardiac Life Support
Cardioresp Pharm 2
Sem Cardiorespiratory Care
Cardioresp MoniSpec Tech
Respiratory Care Practicum 3
Pulmonary Rehab and Geriatrics
Patient Ed Tech Resp Thrpsts
Respiratory Care Practicum 4

2
3
3
4
2
2
3
3
2
3
3
4
3
2
3
2
2
3
3
6
3
3
6





70 crs




107 crs

MINOR IN PUBLIC HEALTH, 18 credits

Minor is not available to students pursuing a major in health education and promotion.

PREFIX

NO

SHORT TITLE

CREDITS

HSC




180
200
310
387
482

Principles of Community Health
Intro to Hlth Ed and Promotion
Healthcare Systems
Quant Mthds and Epid Hlth Pro
Environmental Health

3
3
3
3
3

3 credits from  

HSC








261
344
365
367
368
371
372
381
462
464

Health, Sex, and Family Life (3)
Disease Mgt in Hlth Promotion (3)
Health and Aging (3)
Drug Dependency and Abuse (3)
Consumer Health Issues (3)
Death and Dying (3)
Women and Health (3)
Stress Management (3)
Hlth Prmtn in the Worksite (3)
Hlth Ed in the Clinical Sttng (3)










3




18 crs
Students are responsible for course prerequisites for all elective courses. 

PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY

Courses are offered that fulfill requirements for those students who are planning to apply for admission to physical therapy schools. Preprofessional counseling for this program is available in the School of Kinesiology. 

TEACHER EDUCATION

Teaching programs require additional courses in educational methods. The professional education courses are included in this listing. See the Department of Educational Studies and Teachers College for the descriptions of these courses and other professional requirements of the teacher education program. 
 
Health and Physical Education Teacher Education ─ Decision Point Requirements
Decision Point 1:
  • PEP 161 – satisfactory dispositions; C or better.
  • HSC 160 – C or better.
  • Creation of on-line portfolio.
  • Fitness Test – associated with Fitness/Activity (PEP 161).
  • Demonstrate adequate swim skills or take AQUA 214/215.
Decision Point 2:
  • CASA passed.
  • Overall GPA of 3.0 in at least 45 credits.
  • GPA of 2.75 in major.
  • HSC 290 – satisfactory dispositions; C or better.
  • PEP 209, 227, 291 satisfactory dispositions; C or better.
  • Fitness Test – associated with Fitness/Activity (PEP 252).
  • C or better in 100/200-level professional education courses (EDMU 205 and EDPS 250).
  • C or better in COMM 210.
  • Approval of application for admission in teaching curriculum.
  • Declaration of teaching major via Degree Works.
  • Satisfactorily complete second level of portfolio review.
Decision Point 3:
  • Overall GPA of 3.0 in at least 93 credits.
  • GPA of 3.0 in major.
  • Completion of Writing Proficiency Program.
  • Within 9 credits of completion of content courses.
  • Satisfactorily complete third level of portfolio review.
  • Meet fitness testing requirements (PEP 399).
  • Portfolio – plan, delivery, reflection, and leadership potential.
  • HSC 295, 363, 395 – satisfactory dispositions; C or better.
  • HSC 261, 367, and FCFN 240 – C or better.
  • PEP 310, 394, 399, 400 satisfactory dispositions; C or better.
  • Lesson plan (HSC 295, PEP 394/399).
  • Assessment (PEP 310).
  • Evidence of CPR certification.
Decision Point 4 (after student teaching):
  • Satisfactorily complete student teaching portfolio review.
  • Overall GPA of 3.0.
  • GPA of 3.0 in major.
  • Complete all degree requirements.
  • Current state licensure testing requirements (content and pedagogy).
  • Exit interview/survey.
Approval from student teaching supervisor and University supervisor for graduation.

TEACHING MAJOR IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
(ALL-GRADE) (BA/BS), 92 credits

PREFIX

NO

SHORT TITLE

CREDITS

EXSC

FCFN
HSC






PEP












292
293
240
160
261
290
295
363
367
395
158
161
209
222
227
232
252
291
310
394
399
400
444

Anatomy
Found Physiology and Exercise
Nutrition for Educators
Fundamentals of Human Health
Health, Sex, and Family Life
Eval and Assess in Hlth and PE
Rdg Tech Instr Strat in Hlth
Current Issue Admin Coord H PE
Drug Dependency and Abuse
Meths and Curr Tchng Hlth Ed
Teaching Dance and Gymnastics
Found Prin of Health Phys Ed
Intro to Teaching Physical Ed
Field and Court Invasion Games
Intro Adapted Physical Ed Act
Net and Wall Games
Teaching Fitness Activities
Motor Development and Learn
Formal Assess Health Phys Ed
Teaching Phys Educ in Elem Sch
Teaching Phys Ed High Sch
Curr Design in Physical Educ
Developing Health PE Classroom

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
2
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
2
3




65 crs
Demonstrates competent swimming skills or takes AQUA 214 or 215. Demonstrates CPR and first aid certification.

ALL-GRADE EDUCATION PROGRAM

PREFIX

NO

SHORT TITLE

CREDITS

Professional education sequence, 27 credits

EDAL
EDFO
EDMU
EDPS

EDJH
EDSE

470
420
205
250
390
385
465

Student Teaching: All-Grade (6-7)
Soc, Hist, Phil Found of Ed
Intro to Multicul Ed
Human Growth Development
Educational Psychology
Prin of Tchng in Mid Schl
Elective Student Teaching (3 or 5)

7
3
3
3
3
3
5





27 crs
     
92 crs
See Professional Education Assessment/Decision Points for additional information.

ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCE (AHSC)

201 Introduction to Medical Imaging and Patient Care (2)
Introduction to the profession of medical imaging and patient care including basic concepts of the medical imaging profession, critical thinking and problem solving, introduction to the clinical environment, human diversity, patient care, and ethical and legal issues.        
    Prerequisite: admission to the professional concentration phase of the radiography program.
    Parallel: AHSC 224 and 228 and 231.        
    Open only to radiography students.  

224 Radiographic Procedures 1 (3)
A comprehensive study of radiographic procedures including anatomy, physiology, medical terminology, patient care and positioning, radiation safety, image production, and image critique.
    Prerequisite: admission to the professional concentration phase of the radiography program.
    Parallel: AHSC 201 and 228 and 231.        
    Open only to radiography students.  

225 Radiographic Procedures 2 (4)
Continuation of AHSC 224, including a comprehensive study of radiographic procedures including anatomy, physiology, medical terminology, patient care and positioning, radiation safety, image production and image critique.        
    Prerequisite: AHSC 201 and 224 and 228 and 231. 
    Parallel: AHSC 229 and 232.  
    Open only to radiography students.  

226 Radiographic Procedures 3 (2)
Continuation of AHSC 225, including a comprehensive study of radiographic procedures including anatomy, physiology, medical terminology, patient care and positioning, radiation safety, image production, image critique, and other imaging procedures and emerging technologies in the medical imaging and radiation therapy profession.        
    Prerequisite: AHSC 225 and 229 and 232.        
    Parallel: AHSC 227 and 230 and 233.        
    Open only to radiography students.  

227 Computed Tomography (1)
A study of computed tomography utilized in medical imaging including patient care and safety, imaging procedures, physics and instrumentation and sectional anatomy.        
    Prerequisite: AHSC 225 and 229 and 232.        
    Parallel: AHSC 226 and 230 and 233.        
    Open only to radiography students.  

228 Radiographic Principles 1 (2)
Introduction to radiographic principles including an overview of radiation physics, properties of radiation, biological effects, production and interaction, and radiation biology and protection. 
    Prerequisite: admission to the professional concentration phase of the radiography program.
    Parallel: AHSC 201 and 224 and 231.        
    Open only to radiography students.  

229 Radiographic Principles 2 (3)
Continuation of AHSC 228 including the study of radiographic image production, technical factors, photographic and geometric effects, and radiation protection.        
    Prerequisite: AHSC 201 and 224 and 228 and 231.        
    Parallel: AHSC 225 and 232.        
    Open only to radiography students.  

230 Radiographic Principles 3 (3)
Continuation of AHSC 229 including image production, quality control, radiation protection, and radiographic pathology.        
    Prerequisite: AHSC 225 and 229 and 232.        
    Parallel: AHSC 226 and 227 and 233.        
    Open only to radiography students.  

231 Clinic 1 Radiography (2)
Directed learning experiences in radiographic clinical procedures through a rotational system at affiliated clinical education sites.        
    Prerequisite: admission to the professional concentration phase of the radiography program.
    Parallel: AHSC 201 and 224 and 228.        
    Open only to radiography students.  

232 Clinic 2 Radiography (5)
Directed learning experiences in radiographic clinical procedures through a rotational system at affiliated clinical education sites.        
    Prerequisite: AHSC 201 and 224 and 228 and 231.        
    Parallel: AHSC 225 and 229.        
    Open only to radiography students.  

233 Clinic 3 Radiography (5)
Directed learning experiences in radiographic clinical procedures through a rotational system at affiliated clinical education sites.        
    Prerequisite: AHSC 225 and 229 and 232.        
    Parallel: AHSC 226 and 227 and 230.        
    Open only to radiography students.  

234 Clinic 4 Radiography (4)
Directed learning experiences in radiographic clinical procedures through a rotational system at affiliated clinical education sites.        
    Prerequisite: AHSC 226 and 227 and 230 and 233.        
    Open only to radiography students.

298 Special Studies in Medical Imaging (1-3)
Designed to give current radiography students an opportunity to individually research a topic in the medical imaging and radiation therapy profession. May include experimental work and development of research techniques.        
    Prerequisite: admission to the professional concentration phase of the radiography program and permission of the radiography program director.        
    A total of 3 credits may be earned.        
    Open only to radiography students.

299X Experimental/Developmental Topics (3-6) 
Topics relevant to the discipline. Course titles will be announced before each semester. 
    A total of 6 credits may be earned. 

303 Introduction to Human Diseases for Respiratory Therapists (2) 
Gives respiratory therapy students a general introduction to a broad variety of human diseases. Etiology, diagnosis, and treatment will be discussed. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

311 Cardiorespiratory Physiology (3) 
Focuses on the normal anatomy and physiology of the cardiorespiratory system, including lung mechanics, ventilation, perfusion, diffusion, gas transport, and acid-base balance. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

315 Cardiorespiratory Assessment and Patient Care (3) 
Basic cardiorespiratory assessment, vital signs, laboratory studies, and charting. Includes required preclinical skills and practice. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

325 General Respiratory Care (4) 
Focuses on basic respiratory therapy procedures. Physiologic applications, effects on the cardiopulmonary system, and hazards for each therapeutic procedure are discussed. Topics include physical principles, airway care, humidity and aerosol therapy, medical gas therapy, hyperinflation therapy, and chest physical therapy. 
    Prerequisite: PHYC 110. 
    Parallel: AHSC 326. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

326 Respiratory Care Techniques 1 (2) 
Focuses on the most important clinical laboratory procedures and on procedures used by the respiratory therapist. Specifically, instructs in patient assessment, oxygen administration, humidity and aerosol therapy, chest physical therapy, hyperinflation therapy, and monitoring expired gases. 
    Parallel: AHSC 325. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

333 Cardiorespiratory Pharmacology 1 (2) 
Provides an overview of the basics of pharmacologic therapeutics, focusing on dosages and solutions and bronchodilator drugs. Indications, side effects, mechanism of action, and route of administration are discussed. 
    Prerequisite: BIO 113; CHEM 101.
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

350 Cardiorespiratory Diseases (3) 
Outlines general cardiorespiratory diseases of the adult, including acute and chronic disorders. Respiratory therapeutics applied to these disorders are discussed. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 311. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

355 Life Support (3) 
Includes artificial airways, monitoring, supportive therapy, principles of ventilatory care and maintenance, as well as physiologic effects and complications of airway pressure therapy. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 325. 
    Parallel: AHSC 356. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

356 Respiratory Care Techniques 2 (2) 
Focuses on the most important clinical laboratory procedures and equipment used by the respiratory therapist to support critically ill patients. Specifically, instructs in mechanical ventilators, pressure and heart rate monitors, pulmonary mechanics devices, and arterial blood gas sampling. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 325, 326. 
    Parallel: AHSC 355. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

371 Pulmonary Diagnostics (3) 
Outlines and discusses both normal and abnormal lung volumes and capacities, mechanics of ventilation, inspiratory and expiratory flows, and diffusion of the lung. Additionally, specialty diagnostic techniques such as x-rays, bronchoscopy, ventilation/perfusion scans, and exercise testing are overviewed. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 355. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

385 Respiratory Care Practicum 1 (3) 
Applies cardiopulmonary assessment techniques, information gathering, and communications skills in providing general respiratory care in the clinical setting, including medical gas, humidity and aerosol therapy delivery, and treatment modalities. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 325, 326. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

395 Respiratory Care Practicum 2 (4) 
Introduces variations in oxygen delivery and basic mechanical ventilation. Treatment modalities and hemodynamic monitoring on mechanically ventilated patients will be integrated. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 385. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

405 Neonatal—Pediatric Respiratory Care (3) 
Outlines fetal physiology, cardiorespiratory transition, and respiratory management of neonatal pathologies, including respiratory distress syndrome. Cardiorespiratory techniques for the pediatric patient as well as pediatric trauma and transport are reviewed. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 315, 325. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

420 Introduction to Research in Respiratory Care (2) 
Examines research in respiratory care and applies basic statistics and concepts of research design. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 350. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

430 Management and Leadership for Respiratory Care (3) 
Specific theory and practice applied to directing and managing a respiratory therapy department, including the managerial functions of budgeting, controlling, organization, planning, staffing, and coordinating. Leadership and skills pertinent to these functions as well as effective communication and professionalism are included. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 355. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

440 Advanced Cardiac Life Support (2) 
Introduces the didactic and technical skills needed for successful completion of the advanced cardiac life support proficiencies set forth by the American Heart Association. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 395. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

444 Cardiorespiratory Pharmacology 2 (2) 
An overview of pharmacologic agents and their effects on the various body systems. Drug effects on the respiratory, circulatory, and nervous systems are emphasized. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 333. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

445 Seminar in Cardiorespiratory Care (3) 
Specialty and expanded practice areas of emphasis for respiratory care presented in a seminar format. Emphasis will be placed on critical thinking, judgment skills, and communication abilities. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 456. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

451 Cardiorespiratory Monitoring and Special Techniques (3) 
Reviews electrocardiograms, intracranial pressure monitoring, capnography, and pulmonary artery monitoring techniques. Case studies emphasizing these special procedures are presented. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 385. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

456 Respiratory Care Practicum 3 (6) 
Allows students to provide advanced patient assessment techniques, information gathering skills, and communication and leadership skills in the neonatal/pediatric and adult critical care clinical settings. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 395. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

461 Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Geriatrics (3) 
Gives an overview of rehabilitation therapies and techniques applicable to chronic lung disease, as well as respiratory home care. Basic concepts of gerontology and geriatrics are presented. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 385. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

480 Patient Education Techniques for Respiratory Therapists (3) 
Education techniques for patients and families dealing with chronic respiratory disease. Topics include asthma, COPD, and smoking cessation education. Assessment of learning readiness, reading levels, and patient comprehension will be addressed. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 461. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students. 

485 Respiratory Care Practicum 4 (6) 
Students will manage patients in critical care settings with emphasis on cardiopulmonary assessment and monitoring. Participation in pulmonary rehabilitation, homecare, advanced life support, pulmonary function, polysomnography, and other clinical specialties. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 456. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES: FOODS AND NUTRITION (FCFN)

101 Introduction to Dietetics (1)
Topics dealing with the profession of dietetics; roles and responsibilities of dietetic practitioners; professional standards and code of ethics; legislative issues related to health care; career and continuing education opportunities; marketing of dietetic services; and current trends and issues.
    Open only to pre-dietetics and dietetics majors.

240 Nutrition for Educators (3)
General principles of nutrition as related to growth, development, and health of the infant, child, adolescent, and adult. Classroom application and integration of strategies.
    Not open to students who have credit in FCFN 275 or 340.

275 Personal Nutrition (3)
Emphasizes the principles of nutrition and their application to daily living. The relationship between diet and health, the role of nutrition in reducing individual health risk, and contemporary issues in nutrition will be discussed. Core Transfer Library: Health and Physical Education (IHP 1402)
    Not open to students who have credit in FCFN 240 or 340.

340 Principles of Human Nutrition (3)
Addresses the principles of nutrition, life cycle nutrition, and the relationship of diet to health and disease.
    Prerequisite or parallel: CHEM 100 or 101 or 111 or permission of the department chairperson.
    Not open to students who have credit in FCFN 240 or 275 or by permission of the department chairperson.

345 Macronutrients (3)
Introduces metabolic pathways, cellular metabolism, and various energy systems of the human body. Emphasizes the digestion, metabolism, transport, and excretion of macronutrients.
    Prerequisite: CHEM 360 and FCFN 340 and PHYS 215.
    Open only to those admitted to the dietetics major.

346 Micronutrients and Phytochemicals (3)
Emphasizes the roles of micronutrients in the human body, introduces micronutrient functions in a healthy population and response in times of deficiency. Discusses the role of micronutrients and other food constituents in the prevention of chronic illness.
    Prerequisite: CHEM 360 and FCFN 340 and PHYS 215.
    Open only to those admitted into the dietetics major.

350 Technology of Food Science (3)
Scientific evaluation of the behavior of food and its qualitative and quantitative properties. Overview of the food industry, food technology, biotechnology, and federal regulation related to food supply. Review of research and marketing practices of bioengineered food and dietary supplements.
    Prerequisite: FCFN 220 and PSYS 241.
    Open only to those admitted into the dietetics major.

363 Administration of Food and Nutrition Systems (3)
A systems approach to foodservice management theories, concepts, and functions for integrated health care, public institutions, and nutrition care operations. Emphasizes the operational functions of purchasing, production, and administration of food and nutrition services.

375 Nutrition Assessment, Counseling, and Education (3)
Assessment methods, techniques of nutrition counseling, education principles and implementation, and development of counseling materials. Includes assessment of various populations and counseling experiences.
    Prerequisite: FCFN 340.

396 Nutrition Counseling Practicum (3)
Individual counseling methods; behavior change theories; basic dietary, biochemical, and anthropometric assessment; and multi-culture customs and food practices. Application of theory and counseling skills in various community settings focusing on student's areas of interest. Thirty hours in-class; thirty hours supervised practicum. On-site experiences supervised and evaluated by a registered dietitian.
    Prerequisite: FCFN 345 or permission of the department chairperson.

444 Sports Nutrition and Weight Control (3)
A study of the unique nutrition needs of athletes' physically active populations. Presents the scientific basis for sports nutrition emphasizing concepts such as energy intake and timing, calorie expenditure and balance, and nutrition strategies to improve athletic performance and body composition.
    Prerequisite: FCFN 340.

445 Advanced Nutrition (3)
Emphasizes the use and metabolism of nutrients at the cellular level in the human body. Significance and interpretation of current research in the field of nutrition is discussed.
    Prerequisite: CHEM 360; FCFN 340; senior standing.
    Prerequisite or parallel: ACC 201.

446 Medical Nutrition Therapy 1 (3)
Medical nutritional therapy principles and intervention strategies for the routine management of chronic diseases in at-risk individuals or populations. Application of nutrition assessment principles to diagnose chronic diseases in clinical settings. Pathophysiology of chronic illness. Includes some clinical experiences.
    Prerequisite or parallel: FCFN 346, 396.

447 Medical Nutrition Therapy 2 (3)
Medical nutritional therapy principles and intervention strategies for management of critical and chronic illness and metabolic distress. Pathophysiology of disease progression and traumatic illness.
    Prerequisite: FCFN 446.

448 Nutrition and Weight Management (3)
A study of the etiology, pathophysiology, and interdisciplinary treatment of overweight and obesity. An emphasis will be placed on nutrition as a treatment modality, and the role of nutrition research in guiding public policy.
    Prerequisite: FCFN 340.

455 Lifecycle Nutrition (3)
Involves the study of special nutritional needs, physiology, and health concerns of pregnant and lactating women, infants, children, adolescents, women of child-bearing age, and older adults.
    Prerequisite: FCFN 346 or permission of the department chairperson.

456 Community Nutrition (3)
Overview of community nutrition and nutrition education. Analysis of biological, economic, social, cultural, and policy issue affecting a community’s nutritional status. Emphasis on federal food and nutrition programs and policy implications at the state and local level. Observation and participation in local nutrition programs.
    Prerequisite: FCFN 455.

HEALTH SCIENCE (HSC)

160 Fundamentals of Human Health (3)
Emphasizes life-style behaviors contributing to health promotion and disease prevention. General areas affecting health status are identified and suggestions made as to how health-related behaviors, self-care, and individual decisions contribute to wellness and influence dimensions of health. No regularly scheduled laboratory. 

180 Principles of Community Health (3) 
Provides an introduction to community health concepts by examining the purpose, history, organization, functions, tools, activities, philosophy, and achievements of community health practice at the local, state, national, and international levels. Focuses on populations, settings, and special issues of community health. Includes an out of class service learning component. 

200 Introduction to Health Education and Promotion (3)
Basic philosophy and practice in health education emphasizing work settings and health educator roles. Early exposure to the literature and organizations that support health education. Lab experience working with a practitioner. Students are required to complete 20 shadowing/professional development hours.
    Open only to health education and promotion majors and community health education minors.  

210 Health Behavior Theories (3)
Provides students with an overview of how the social and behavioral sciences contribute to primary prevention in the rapidly expanding field of health behavior. Emphasis will be placed on theory-driven approaches that are supported by empirical investigations. Students will acquire a working knowledge of foundational theories used in public health practice as well as the ability to measure key theoretical constructs.        
    Prerequisite: HSC 180 and 200.  

220 Population, Race, and Culture in Health Promotion (3)
Explores the aspects of race and culture that influence health, public health policy, and the management and practice of healthcare. Among the aspects of U.S. culture that will be discussed are: race, ethnicity, gender, social class, and nationality. These cultural factors immediately impact patient- provider interaction, health and illness behavior, health care provider decision-making and ultimately impact health status. This knowledge will enhance students' ability to serve as educated citizen advocates for improving health of disadvantaged groups. 
    Prerequisite: HSC 180 and 200.

250 Emergency Health Care (3) 
Prevention and emergency procedures of various emergency health problems and injuries, including cardiac and respiratory arrest. First Aid and CPR certifications are offered. 
    Not open to students who have credit in AT 240 or PEP 250. 

261 Health, Sexuality, and Family Life (3) 
Health aspects of human sexuality and family life with a focus on human reproduction, physiology of sexual response, sexual disorders and dysfunctions, sexually transmitted diseases, promotion of sexual health, and the family’s role in sex education. 

279 Peer Health Education (1) 
This is a one-credit course designed to train students as Peer Health Educators (PHEs). Students present health promotion programs to campus groups such as residence halls, student organizations, academic classes, fraternities, and sororities. PHEs also man awareness events, complete assignments and self evaluations of their performance, and attend special events as representatives of Health Education. May not be repeated.

290 Evaluation and Assessment in Health and Physical Education (3)
Designed as an introduction to evaluation and assessment strategies in health and physical education. Students will be introduced to content standards, assessment and evaluation, learn how to use standards as a guide for assessment, construction of assessment instruments including rubrics for assessing student work, and use of assessment results.
    Prerequisite: PEP 161 and HSC 160 and decision point 1 complete.
    Open only to health and physical education teacher education majors.

295 Reading, Technology, and Instructional Strategies in School Health (3)
Designed to prepare students to exercise best practice literacy, technology, and instructional strategies within the health classroom. Students will learn to design and deliver standards-based health instruction while effectively integrating reading and technology. Emphasis will be on creating a literacy-rich classroom environment, improving communication with learners and their parents through the use of technology, and creating an engaging learning environment.
    Prerequisite: HSC 160 and 290; or permission of the department chairperson; meet decision point 2 requirements.
    Open only to health and physical education teaching majors.

299X Experimental/Developmental Topics (3-6) 
Topics relevant to the discipline. Course titles will be announced before each semester.
    A total of 6 credits may be earned. 

300 Health Promotion Programming (5)
Explores the major components of planning, implementing, and evaluation of health promotion programs.
    Prerequisite: HSC 180, 200.
    Open only to health science majors and minors. 

301 Program Planning in Health Promotion 1 (3)
Explores the major components of health promotion program planning, conducting needs assessments, and developing appropriate interventions.        
    Prerequisite: HSC 210 and 220.        
    Open only to health education and promotion majors and community health education minors.  

302 Program Planning in Health Promotion 2 (3)
Explores the major components of health promotion program implementation and evaluation. Students will have the opportunity to design and conduct program evaluation.        
    Prerequisite: HSC 301.  

310 Healthcare Systems (3)
Provides students with an overview of the U.S. healthcare system, its components and the policy challenges created by its organization. Describes the structure and function of the various private and public health care entities within the U.S. Strengths and weaknesses related to cost, quality and access are also analyzed. Basic economic theories that drive financing will also be considered.        
    Prerequisite: HSC 180 and 200; junior status.  

344 Disease Management in Health Promotion (3)
Explores current information about infectious and non-infectious diseases from a non-clinical perspective to support the needs of health education programs in a variety of settings. 
    Prerequisite: HSC 160 and 210 and PHYS 205.    

350 Elementary School Health Program (3) 
School’s role in promoting health and preventing disease among preschool and elementary school children. Focus on school health program (instruction, services, and environment), community resources, and health problems common to school children. No regularly scheduled laboratory. 
    Prerequisite: sophomore standing. 

363 Current Issues in Administration and Coordination of Health and Physical Education (3)
Addresses new and emerging issues in education, school health and physical education. Specific processes and issues associated with best practices in needs assessment, planning, implementing, evaluating school-based programs; coordination of school health/PE policies and programs in accordance with national and state guidelines; and controversial issues associated with health and wellness will be addressed.
    Prerequisite: HSC 290 and 295 or permission of the department chairperson; meet decision point 2 requirements.
    Open only to health and physical education teacher education majors.

365 (469) Health and Aging (3)
Dynamics of later life and the aging process with specific emphasis on health. The physiological and behavioral dimensions of the aging process will be analyzed and discussed.

367 (467) Drug Dependency and Abuse (3)
Analyzes the medical, psychological, sociological, and legal dimensions of drug use in the United States. Examines the incidence and prevalence of drug abuse together with the roles played by the school and community in dealing with this health problem.

368 (468) Consumer Health Issues (3)
Health services and consumer protection organizations. Analysis of fraudulent health practices and nostrums, available health care systems, and health products.

371 (471) Death and Dying (3)
Analyzes the relationship between death and health with emphasis on the physiological, medical, psychological, legal, and consumer aspects of dying in contemporary America. Investigates problems that relate to the meaning of death, care of the dying, death ritual, bereavement, and death education.

372 (472) Women and Health (3)
General overview of issues related to women and health: health needs of working women, special nutritional concerns, the gynecological exam, reproductive anatomy and physiology, fertility and infertility, breast problems, wife abuse, and rape.

381 (481) Stress Management (3)
Aids in understanding the physiological, psychological, and sociological aspects of stress. Students will increase their awareness of the effects of stress, identify personal stress triggers, and develop strategies to minimizing stress throughout their daily lives.

387 Quantitative Methods and Epidemiology in Health Promotion (3)
Introduction to the basic concepts, methods, and tools of public health data collection, use and analysis, practical applications of quantitative methods in health science. Weekly one-hour laboratory period emphasizes data management and analysis using advanced technology.
    Prerequisite: HSC 180 and MATH 108 or 111 or 112 or 125 or 132 or 161 or 162 or 165 or 166; junior status.  

388 Organization and Administration in Health Promotion (3)
Helps students understand the organization and administration of community health agencies, including public health agencies and voluntary health agencies at the national, state, and local levels. Effective advocacy strategies, the importance of cultural competence, building and sustaining successful coalitions, and group facilitation techniques are addressed. The preparation of community health grant proposals and competencies of health education professionals are also addressed.  
    Prerequisite: HSC 301.

389 Insects and Your Health (3) 
A survey of the diseases caused or transmitted by insects and other arthropods. Emphasizes the recognition of medically important arthropods and their biology and control. A weekly 3-hour laboratory provides an opportunity to collect and study live and preserved arthropod specimens. 

390 Honors Colloquium in Health Science (1-4) 
Exploration of selected current issues in health science with an emphasis upon individualized study, reporting, and discussion. Restricted to honors students. 
    A total of 4 credits may be earned.

395 Methods, Materials, and Curriculum for Teaching Health Education (3)
Application of the roles of the health teacher in a school setting. Functions considered include curriculum development including planning for instruction, instructional strategies, assessment; strategies for engaging diverse learners; and acting as a resource person for school health.
    Prerequisite: HSC 290, 295, and 363; or permission of the department chairperson; completion of decision point 2.
    Open only to health and physical education teacher education majors.

396 Health Communication Media Production (2) 
Designed to introduce graphic design and presentation methods with direct application to various health education settings. Students will complete several creative projects using relevant electronic technology and materials. 
    Prerequisite: HSC 300 and 494 or permission of the department chairperson.

398 Workshop in Health Science (1-6) 
Critical contemporary issues in health science. May include consultants, guest lecturers, field trips, and group activities. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson. 
    A total of 6 credits may be earned.

462 Health Promotion in the Worksite (3) 
Explores the major components of planning, implementing, and evaluation of health promotion programs. 
    Prerequisite: EXSC 301 or HSC 300 or permission of the instructor. 

464 Health Education in the Clinical Setting (3) 
Theories of client education and application of the education process to individuals and groups in health-care settings. Emphasis on the multidisciplinary team concept in planning, implementing, and evaluating client education. Application of knowledge of growth and development in meeting learning needs of clients. 
    Prerequisite: HSC 300 or permission of the instructor.

479 Internship (6)
Serves as the culminating experiential opportunity enabling students to demonstrate their ability to perform the UCC Tier 3 cognitive skills from "experience to information to action." Consists of a paid or unpaid internship experience in an approved environmental, public, community, clinical, worksite, or other health science program setting working a minimum of 360 hours. Integrates specified academic elements in addition to on-site work objectives. The internship provides students with experience in a minimum of four of the seven responsibility areas as outlined in the Responsibilities and Competencies for Entry-Level Health Education Specialists (NCHEC). 
    Prerequisite: admission to internship program. 

482 Environmental Health (3)
Examines health issues, scientific understanding of causes, and possible future approaches to control of the major environmental health problems in industrialized and developing countries. The relationship of people to their environment, how it affects their physical well-being, and what they can do to influence the quality of the environment and to enhance the protection of their health are also emphasized. Basic concepts of the modes of transmission of environmental stressors from source or reservoir to host and methods of reducing their impact on human population are accentuated. 
    Prerequisite: HSC 180.  

487 Applied Research, Writing, and Evaluation in Health Promotion (3)
Provides an introduction to general principles and basic techniques of research methods appropriate to the investigation of problems in community health. Students will evaluate the writing and statistical analyses of existing research articles. Students will also produce a research proposal and provide a scientifically rigorous paper that includes introduction, methodology, and results/evaluation sections.
    Prerequisite: HSC 387; senior status.  

494 (394) Health Communication (3)
Contemporary health communication issues, including communication strategies, models, and theories, to enhance delivery of health education programs in various settings. Central focus on application of social marketing principles and planning models. Micro-level (interpersonal interactions with other people) and macro-level (organizational and mass media) applications emphasized. 
    Prerequisite: HSC 220 and 301.  

495 Professional Preparation in Health Promotion (3)
Provides information and resources to help students prepare for internships and careers in community health education, including student strategies to achieve a passing score on the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) examination.        
    Prerequisite: HSC 302.

498 Special Studies in Health Science (1-6) 
Designed to give undergraduate health science students who exhibit special aptitude and interest an opportunity to pursue special lines of scientific investigation on an individual basis. Experimental work, wide reading, and development of research techniques or skills. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson. 
    A total of 6 credits may be earned.