Undergraduate Course Catalog

Geological Sciences

S. Rice-Snow, Chairperson

Geoscientists study the earth with primary attention to its history, materials, and structure, and to the active processes that continue to change the landscape. Geologists investigate environmental problems such as geologic hazards involving flooding, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions, evaluate groundwater resources, discover new mineral and petroleum deposits, study geochemical cycles associated with climate and study the moon and planets.

The Department of Geology offers three major options:

  1. major in geology,
  2. major in earth science, and
  3. major in earth/space science education.

The major in earth/space science education prepares students for teaching at the middle and high school levels. The major in geology provides students with classic geologic training and involves a strong background in math and science and the applications of these fields to geology. The major in earth science provides students with a comprehensive overview of interacting earth systems including lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere, as well as understanding the evolution of earth’s physical and biological systems through time. Both of these majors prepare students for geological careers in industry, environmental consulting and government agencies, and for graduate study that leads to research, teaching, management, and many other positions in industry, government, and education.


MAJOR IN GEOLOGY, 65-67 hours

Students are expected to have completed GEOL 101 or a high school or college earth science course with an approved geology lab and mathematics through MATHS 112 or the high school equivalent as approved by the primary departmental advisor.

PREFIX     

NO      

SHORT TITLE

CR HRS

GEOL
  
  
  
 





CHEM

PHYCS

201
207
220
240
290
308
310
315
383
460
111
112
110
112
Earth Time
Envir Geol
Earth Mater
Geomorpholgy
Cmptr Geosci
Invert Paleo
Petrology
Structural
Field Camp
Hydrogeology
Gen Chem 1
Gen Chem 2
Gen Phycs 1
Gen Phycs 2

3
3
3
3
1
3
4
4
6
3
4
4
4
4

12 hours from
GEOL










409
410
412
416
420
425
435
445
470
471
475
Micropaleo (3)
Ig Met Pet (3)
Sed Petr (3)
Enginr Geol (3)
G P Ocean (3)
Geophysics (3)
Stratigraphy (3)
Fractals Sci (3)
Geochemistry (3)
Volc Hazards (3)
Glacial Geol (3)

  
  
  
  
  
  
  

  
  
12 

4–6 hours from
MATHS



165
or
161
and
Calculus 1(4)

Appl Calc 1 (3)




 

3 hours from
MATHS

162
181
Appl Calc 2 (3)
El Prob Stat (3)


4-6


65-67 hrs
Skills in a modern foreign language are encouraged. Recommended minors include biology, chemistry, physics, computer science, economics, geography, mathematics, and natural resources.


MAJOR IN EARTH SCIENCE, 61 hours

Students are expected to have completed GEOL 101 or a high school or college earth science course with an approved geology lab and mathematics through MATHS 112 or their high school equivalent as approved by the primary departmental advisor.

PREFIX     

NO      

SHORT TITLE

CR HRS

GEOL
 
 
 

 





GEOG
NREM
CHEM
201
207
220
240
290
308
310
315
383
420
460
230
221
111
Earth Time 
Envir Geol 
Earth Mater 
Geomorpholgy 
Cmptr Geosci 
Invert Paleo 
Petrology 
Structural 
Field Camp 
G P Ocean 
Hydrogeology  
Elem Meteor 
Soil Resourc 
Gen Chem 1

3
3
3
3
1
3
4
4
6
3
3
3
3
4

9-12 hours from
GEOL









409
410
412
416
425
435
445
470
471
475
Micropaleo (3)
Ig Met Pet (3)
Sed Petr (3)
Enginr Geol (3)
Geophysics (3)
Stratigraphy (3)
Fractals Sci (3)
Geochemistry (3)
Volc Hazards (3)
Glacial Geol (3)

 








9-12

3-6 hours from
GEOG


NREM

265
331
342
324

Intro G I S (3)
Glob Climate (3)
Intr Rem Sen (3)
Soil Classif (3)




3-6


61 hrs
Recommended: CS 120 and one year of college chemistry or physics or both. Recommended majors and minors include anthropology, biology, business administration, chemistry, economics, modern languages and classics, geography, mathematics, natural resources, and physics.


MINOR IN GEOLOGY, 18 hours

PREFIX     

NO      

SHORT TITLE

CR HRS

GEOL

101
201

Planet Earth  
Earth Time

3
3

12 hours from elective sequence approved by a geology faculty advisor (GEOL 206 not included)



12


18 hrs
Specific elective sequences are recommended for particular majors such as various business, environmental planning, and science disciplines.


MINOR IN EARTH/SPACE SCIENCE, 24 hours

PREFIX     

NO      

SHORT TITLE

CR HRS

GEOG
 
GEOL 
GEOG
GEOL
 
GEOL

101
or
101
230
201
240
420

Erth Sea Sky (3)

Planet Earth (3)  
Elem Meteor  
Earth Time 
Geomorpholgy 
G P Ocean



3
3
3
3
3

9 hours from

GEOG
GEOL




ASTRO

331 
207
220
308
310
383
120
382

Glob Climate (3) 
Envir Geol (3) 
Earth Mater (3) 
Invert Paleo (3) 
Petrology (4) 
Field Camp (6) 
Sun & Stars (3) 
Plantrm Oper (3)








9


24 hrs


TEACHER EDUCATION

SCIENCE TEACHING MAJORS

(See Science, College of Sciences and Humanities, for the teaching major in Earth/Space Science.)


GEOLOGY (GEOL)

101 Planet Earth’s Geological Environment. (3)
Introductory study of the materials, structure, and surface features of the earth; the processes responsible for their development; geologic hazards; and the application of geologic knowledge to mankind’s environmental and resource problems. Local area field trip. Regularly scheduled laboratory.

105 Laboratory in Physical Geology. (1)
Practical study of minerals, rock, planemetric and topographic maps, fold and fault structures, geological maps, climate change, earthquakes, flooding, sustainability; local field trip. An introductory high school or college earth science course, taught with GEOL 101L. 
    Prerequisite: an introductory high school or college earth science course; permission of the department chairperson. 
    Not open to students who have credit in GEOL 101. 
    Open only to geology and earth science students that had an introductory earth science course without a lab similar to GEOL 101.

110 Age of the Dinosaurs. (3)
Discussion of the dinosaurs, their classification, their relationship to the environment, their geographic distribution, and their geologic record. Special emphasis on new theories about dinosaur ecology, behavior, and extinction.

201 (102) Earth, Life, and Time. (3)
Introduction to the geologic history of the Earth’s dynamic systems in relation to the development of the modern environment. Regularly scheduled laboratory. 
    Prerequisite: any UCC-21 Tier 1 course in the Natural Sciences Domain or permission of the department chairperson.

206 Oceans and Nations. (3)
Worldwide human interactions with the oceans and international conflicts of interest related to the marine environment. Introduction to oceanography, marine law, resource conflicts, pollution, cooperation for research and hazard response, and other topics. Credit does not count toward the geology minor.

207 Environmental Geology—Geological/Geochemical Cycles. (3)
Explores the geochemical cycling in the interior of the Earth and its effects on surface processes, the cycling of components crucial for humans and life in general such as water, carbon, and nitrogen, and the geologic cycling of hazardous chemicals such as heavy metals. Regularly scheduled laboratory. 
    Prerequisite: GEOL 101; CHEM 111; or high school equivalents, or permission of the department chairperson.

220 Earth Materials. (3)
Principles of crystallography and mineralogy and the relationships of minerals to the composition and types of rocks of the earth’s crust. Laboratory work concerned with crystallographic operations and the identification of minerals by physical and chemical properties. Regularly scheduled laboratory. 
    Prerequisite: GEOL 101; an introductory chemistry course or the high school equivalent or permission of the department chairperson.

240 Geomorphology. (3)
Study of landforms and their evolution. Local area field trips. Regularly scheduled laboratory. 
    Prerequisite: GEOL 101 or the high school equivalent or permission of the department chairperson.

290 Computer Applications in the Geosciences. (1)
Survey of the various computer applications in the geosciences. Designed to supplement existing geoscience and computer science courses by providing opportunity to gain experience in working with software programs in various geoscience data-collecting, calculation, and graphic display applications. 
    A total of 3 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 1 in any one semester or term.

299X Experimental/Developmental Topics. (3-9)
Immersion or experiential topics relevant to the discipline. Section titles will be announced before each semester. 
    A total of 9 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 6 in any one semester or term.

302 Global Positioning System Techniques. (1)
Global Positioning System (GPS) surveying and mapping techniques. Overview of satellite and system technology, examination of various GPS units available for applications, techniques using units individually or in combination for mapping and navigation, differential GPS methods, use in computer-generated maps. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson. 
    A total of 3 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 1 in any one semester or term.

308 Invertebrate Paleontology. (3)
Principles of paleontology as revealed by invertebrate fossils. Fossilization, morphology, evolution, and life association of the important invertebrate phyla (Coelenterata, Bryozoa, Brachiopoda, Mollusca, Arthropoda, and Echinodermata). Local area field trip. Regularly scheduled laboratory. 
    Prerequisite: GEOL 201 or permission of the department chairperson.

310 Petrology. (4)
Designed for middle-level undergraduate geology majors. Incorporates information on recent advances in our understanding of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Provides an overview of the field of petrology and a solid foundation for more advanced studies. 
    Prerequisite: GEOL 220 or permission of the department chairperson.

315 Structural Geology, Tectonics and Basic Field Methods. (4)
Designed to give middle- and upper-level students an introduction to rock-deformation theory, structural geology, and tectonics. Looks at microscopic to macroscopic deformation of rock in the Earth’s lithosphere and basic field mapping techniques. Associated field trips. 
    Prerequisite: GEOL 201, 220; MATHS 112 or equivalent, or permission of the department chairperson.

369 Professional Experience. (1-4)
Paid professional work and learning experience arranged during one or more semesters or summers. Eligible students will be placed in an approved agency or private business. Assignments, including activity log, self-analysis, and summary report, are supervised by the department. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson and the coordinator of internships. 
    A total of 4 hours of credit may be earned.

383 Geology Field Camp. (6)
An immersion experience applying field techniques to the resolution of geologic problems. Group and individual projects include accumulation and interpretation of field observations and preparation of geologic maps, cross sections, and stratigraphic sections to answer geologic questions. Five-week summer course in the Rocky Mountains. 
    Prerequisite: GEOL 201, 220, 240, 290, 315; or permission of the department chairperson.

409 Micropaleontology. (3)
Morphology, classification, preparation techniques, and evolution of paleontologically significant microfossil groups and their biostratigraphic and paleoecologic significance. Emphasizes foraminifera, conodonts, and ostracodes. Regularly scheduled laboratory. 
    Prerequisite: GEOL 308 or permission of the department chairperson.

410 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology. (3)
Igneous and metamorphic petrology is an introduction to the processes responsible for, and the rocks and minerals associated with, the formation of both igneous and metamorphic rocks. Looks at the microscopic to macroscopic features associated with these processes. Laboratory section required. 
    Prerequisite: GEOL 220, 310 or permission of the department chairperson.

412 Sedimentary Petrology. (3)
A petrographic approach to the classification and genetic interpretation of sedimentary rocks. Terrigenous sandstones and carbonate rocks will be emphasized with lesser stress on mud rocks and non-carbonate chemical rocks. 
    Prerequisite: GEOL 201, 220, 310 or permission of the department chairperson.

416 Engineering Geology of Hazards and the Environment. (3)
Emphasis on applications to hazard and environmental problems. Engineering properties and mechanics of rocks and soil; geologic materials in construction; erosion, mass wasting, subsidence; flooding, shoreline, seismic, volcanic, and other natural hazards. Dams, tunnels, mines, shoreline structures, and other special construction problems; groundwater engineering problems; applied geophysics for subsurface exploration.
    Prerequisite: an introductory course such as GEOL 101, 207, 240, NREM 211 or EMHS 352, and MATHS 108, or permission of the department chairperson.
    Not open to students who have credit in GEOL 516.

420 Geological and Physical Oceanography. (3)
Description of geological and physical characteristics of the oceans, marine processes, and related topics. 
    Prerequisite: GEOL 201 and CHEM 111 or permission of the department chairperson.

425 Geophysics. (3)
An introduction to refraction and reflection seismology; magnetic, electrical, gravity, radioactivity, and geothermal methods. Emphasizes geophysical methods applied to such problems as energy resources, mineral and groundwater exploration, site evaluation, and pollution detection. Includes laboratory exercises and field investigations. 
    Prerequisite: GEOL 101, 201, or permission of the department chairperson.

435 Stratigraphy and Subsurface Methods. (3)
Principles and practices of lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, and sequence stratigraphy. Use of surface and subsurface stratigraphic data in the reconstruction of depositional environments and sedimentary basins. 
    Prerequisite: GEOL 201, 220, 310 or permission of the department chairperson.

445 Fractals in the Natural Sciences. (3)
Fractal geometric models and data analysis methods of practical use in the sciences. Application examples drawn from geosciences and other natural science fields. Divider, box, size-number, variogram, and rescaled range methods, along with other techniques. Discussion of chaos and self-organized criticality as possible sources of fractals in nature. 
    Prerequisite: MATHS 108.

450 Geology of Indiana. (3)
Rocks, structure, fossils, landforms, economic resources, and geologic history of Indiana. Field-trip oriented with collection of rock, mineral, and fossil specimens. 
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term.

460 Hydrogeology. (3)
Occurrence and movement of surface water and groundwater, with special reference to the effect of the geologic environment. 
    Prerequisite: GEOL 201 or 207 or 240 or NREM 211; MATHS 108; or permission of the department chairperson.

470 Groundwater Geochemistry. (3)
Introduces the processes controlling the composition of natural waters; streams, lakes, oceans, and near-surface groundwaters. Focuses on the effects of human activities, biological systems, and inorganic geochemistry processes on water chemistry. 
    Prerequisite: GEOL 101; CHEM 111, 112; or permission of the department chairperson.

471 Volcanology and Volcanic Hazards. (3)
Designed to give middle and upper level students a working knowledge of the causes and effects of the various types of volcanism ranging from quiescent Hawaiian-style volcanoes to the explosive SW Pacific volcanoes. In addition, looks at volcanic prediction, monitoring, and hazard response programs. 
    Prerequisite: GEOL 201 or permission of the department chairperson.

475 Glacial Geology. (3)
In-depth study of the physical nature of glaciers, their deposits, and the erosional and depositional landforms they create. Introduction to glacial history of the north-central United States. Term paper required. 
    Prerequisite: GEOL 240; PHYCS 110 or 120; or permission of the instructor.

480 Special Studies and Field Problems. (1-3)
Selected detailed geologic problems under the guidance of a qualified instructor. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson. 
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term.