Undergraduate Course Catalog

Physiology and Health Science

J. Clark, Chairperson

The Department of Physiology and Health Science offers a variety of programs in allied health science, basic science, health promotion, disease prevention and environmental health. Program emphases include community health education, school health education (leading to grades 7-12 certification), public health, nuclear medicine technology, radiation therapy, radiography, and respiratory therapy. The latter three programs are offered in cooperation with Clarian Health Partners, Inc. Interested students should contact the Department of Physiology and Health Science to obtain a copy of the desired admission and retention policy and plan of study. In addition, the department houses the Public Health Entomology Laboratory and the national office of Eta Sigma Gamma, the health education honorary.

ASSOCIATE DEGREES
Associate degree programs prepare students for careers in nuclear medicine technology, radiation therapy, and radiography. The first phase of the program takes place on the Ball State campus. The second phase is offered in Indianapolis, where medical, technical, and clinical courses are taught at Clarian Health/Methodist Hospital and other clinical education sites.

Students may apply for admission to the professional/clinical phase of the programs when the following minimum requirements are met:

  • 14 hours of required courses are successfully completed/earned;
  • 3 of 5 math/science courses are successfully completed/earned;
  • C or better in required math/science courses;
  • 2.5 overall GPA from ONLY required preclinical courses;
  • must meet with Terrie L. Greenwalt, Primary Departmental Advisor.

Due to the limited number of clinical phase spaces available, all students who meet minimum admission requirements may not be admitted to the clinical phase. Acceptance to the professional/clinical part of the programs is conditional, based upon satisfactory completion of the remaining required courses and an application process. Interested students should contact the Department of Physiology and Health Science for information specific to their desired plan of study.

BACHELOR’S DEGREES
Two of the bachelor degree programs prepare students for careers as health educators. The major in health science prepares students to serve as health educators in community health settings that include, but are not limited to, governmental health agencies, community health agencies, clinical health settings, and in business and industries. In addition to the course work required in this major, students must also complete a semester-long internship.
The teching major in school health education prepares students to serve as health educators in middle and high school settings. In addition to the course work required in the major, students must complete the professional education course sequence and teacher education requirements, including a student teaching experience.

The second bachelor degree program prepares students for careers in respiratory therapy. Respiratory therapists help diagnose, treat, rehabilitate, and educate to prevent and manage cardiopulmonary diseases. They are skilled in airway maintenance, procurement and analysis of arterial blood gas samples, and performance of pulmonary function tests. Students may enter the general studies portion of the program upon admission to the university; however, admission to the program is competitive, and admission to the university does not guarantee acceptance to the professional studies/clinical phase of the program. The professional studies courses are taught at Clarian Health/Methodist Hospital in Indianapolis. Students may apply for admission to the professional studies/clinical portion of this program when the following requirements are met:

  • 28 hours of the required courses are completed;
  • 10 of these completed hours are in the required math/science courses;
  • C or better in required math/science courses; 2.5 overall GPA;
  • completion and documentation of at least three hours of clinical observation.

Standards for acceptance to the internship program, enrollment in HSC 479, Practical Experience

  • All candidates for internships in health science (HSC 479) must fill out applications with the internship coordinator in advance of the intended start of the internship. 
  • In order to enroll in HSC 479, health science majors must have taken a minimum of 25 credit hours in health science, and must earn a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.5 in the following health science courses: HSC 200, 300, 385, 387, 394, and 396; HSC 363 or 462 or 464. 
  • Students earning minors in community health education, environmental health, or public health must have completed all minor requirements, with a cumulative grade-point average of 2.5 in those requirements, in order to enroll in HSC 479. 
  • Students who do not meet the above requirements may submit a written appeal to the department chairperson for a waiver.


ASSOCIATE DEGREES

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE—NUCLEAR
MEDICINE TECHNOLOGY, 64 hours

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General education, 28 hours

ANAT
CHEM
COMM
CS
ENG
MATHS
PHYCS
PHYSL
PSYSC
PFW

201
100
210
104
103
125
100
205
100
101

Fund Hum Ana 
People Chem
Fund Pub Com
Intro Comp
Rhet & Writ
Math Applic
Cncept Phycs
Fund Physl
General
Phys Fit & Well

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1


28 hrs
Concentration area, 36 hours

AHSC

200
240
241
242
243
245
247
248
249
251
252
254

Intro Care
Clinic 1 N M
Clinic 2 N M
Clinic 3 N M
Clinic 4 N M
Theory Adm
Radioactivity
Radiopharmal
Rad Bio Sfty
Nuc Med Inst
Nuc Med Lab
Dir Res N M

2
3
3
3
3
5
3
3
2
4
2
3

        

36 hrs

64 hrs
Students qualifying for exemption from ENG 103 will receive credit for the course. ENG 101 and 102 may be substituted for ENG 103.

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE—RADIATION
THERAPY, 64 hours

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General education, 28 hours

ANAT
CHEM
COMM
CS
ENG
MATHS
PHYCS
PHYSL
PSYSC
PFW

201
100
210
104
103
125
100
205
100
101

Fund Hum Ana 
People Chem
Fund Pub Com
Intro Comp
Rhet & Writ
Math Applic
Cncept Phycs
Fund Physl
General
Phys Fit & Well

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1


28 hrs
Concentration area, 36 hours

AHSC

200
278
279
280
281
282
283
284
285
286
287
288
289
290

Intro Care
Rad Physics
Rad Bio Ther
Ornt Rad Thy
Clinic 1 R T
Rad Onc Phys
Onc Path 1
Clinic 2 R T
Tec Rad On 1
Onc Path 2
Tec Rad On 2
Trt Plan Dos
Clinic 3 R T
Clinic 4 R T

2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2

        

36 hrs

64 hrs
Students qualifying for exemption from ENG 103 will receive credit for the course. ENG 101 and 102 may be substituted for ENG 103.
 
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE—RADIOGRAPHY,
64 hours

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General education, 28 hours

ANAT
CHEM
COMM
CS
ENG
MATHS
PHYCS
PHYSL
PSYSC
PFW

201
100
210
104
103
125
100
205
100
101

Fund Hum Ana 
People Chem
Fund Pub Com
Intro Comp
Rhet & Writ
Math Applic
Cncept Phycs
Fund Physl
General
Phys Fit & Well

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1


28 hrs
Concentration area, 36 hours

AHSC

201
224
225
226
228
229
230
231
232
233
234

Intro To Rad
Radiograph 1
Radiograph 2
Radiograph 3
Rad Princ 1
Rad Princ 2
Rad Princ 3
Clinic 1 Rad
Clinic 2 Rad
Clinic 3 Rad
Clinic 4 Rad

3
3
4
4
3
4
4
1
4
4
2


36 hrs

64 hrs
Students qualifying for exemption from ENG 103 will receive credit for the course. ENG 101 and 102 may be substituted for ENG 103.

BACCALAUREATE DEGREES

Students will be guided by the outline of baccalaureate degrees, the University Core Curriculum, and the concentration areas listed below.

MAJOR IN HEALTH SCIENCE, 58 hours

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HSC










ANAT
PHYSL
FCSFN

160
180
200
300
385
387
394
396
444
479
499
201
205
240

Human Health
Prn Com Hlth
Intro Health
Hth Prom Pro
Com Hl Mthds
Qua Meth Epi
Hlth Ed Comm
Hlth Com Med
Dis Mgt Hp
Prac Exp (3-9)
Sr Seminar
Fund Hum Ana
Fund Physl
Ntr Educatrs

3
3
3
5
4
4
3
2
3
6
1
3
3
3

3 hours from
HSC 363
462
464
CSHP:Org Iss (3)
Hl Pro Wkste (3)
H Ed Clinic (3)


3

28 hrs
9 hours from
HSC











BIO
CPSY
ECON
MGT


NUR
PSYSC
250
261
465
or
467
468
469
471
472
481
482
496
113
360
348
200
261
271
101
301
Emergncy H C (3)
Health Sex (3)
Alcohol Prob (3)

Drug Depn Ab (3)
Con Hlth Iss (3)
Health Aging (3)
Death Dying (3)
Women Health (3)
Stress Mang (3)
Environ Hlth (3)
Ad Hlth Comm (3)
Microbio HSc (5)
Intrelat Sxl (3)
Health Econ (3)
Mngnt Prin (3)
Persnel Supr (3)
Intr Org Beh (3)
Terminology (2)
Psych Health (3)











 








9


58 hrs
Students electing PSYSC 301 should complete PSYSC 100 for University Core Curriculum.

MAJOR IN RESPIRATORY THERAPY, 110 hours

Admission and retention requirements:
  • Completion of 28 hours of course work. 
  • 10 of the 28 hours of course work must be in math/science courses required for the program. 
  • Grade of C or better in the required math/science courses. 
  • Minimum overall grade-point average of 2.5. 
  • Minimum grade of C in each professional course. 
  • Program graduates must pass a series of three national examinations, the first of which is also required for licensure as a Respiratory Care Practitioner in Indiana.

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Foundation courses

CHEM
HSC
PSYSC
PHYSC
PHIL

101
160
100
110
100

Biochem HSc
Human Health
General
Gen Phycs 1
Introduction

5
3
3
4
3


18 hrs
Required prerequisites

MATHS
ANAT
PHYSL
PSYSC
BIO
CS

111
201
215
241
113
104

PC-Coll Alg 
Fund Hum Ana 
Human Physio 
Statistics
Microbio HSc 
Micro Lit

3
3
5
3
5
3


22 hrs
Required AHSC courses, 70 hours

AHSC

303
311
315
325
326
333
350
355
356
371
385
395
405
420
430
440
444
445
451
456
461
480
485

Human Dis
Cardio Resp
Resp Pt Care
General Resp
Resp Tech 1
Cr Pharm 1
Cr Diseases
Life Support
Resp Tech 2
Pulm Diag
Resp Prac 1
R C Pract 2
Neo Ped Rec
R C Research
Mgmt for R C
Ad Life Sup
Cr Pharm 2
Sem Cardresp
Cr Mon & Tec
R C Pract 3
Pulm Rehab
Pt Ed for RT
R C Pract 4

2
3
3
4
2
2
3
3
2
3
3
4
3
2
3
2
2
3
3
6
3
3
6


70 hrs

110 hrs

MINOR IN COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION,
25 hours

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CR HRS

HSC

180
200
300
385
387
479
482

Prn Com Hlth
Intro Health
Hth Prom Pro
Com Hl Mthds
Qua Meth Epi
Prac Exp (3-9)
Environ Hlth

3
3
5
4
4
3
3


25 hrs
Not open to health science majors. Students must earn a 2.5 grade-point average in the minor courses in order to enroll in HSC 479.

MINOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH,
19-20 hours

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HSC


FCSFN

387
389
482
247

Qua Meth Epi
Ins and Hlth
Environ Hlth
Fd San Purch

4
3
3
3

6-7 hours from

BIO
PHYSL
NREM






HSC

313
416
346
347
348
350
385
369
or
479

Microbiology (4)
Human Tox (3)
In Env Qual (3) 
Occ Ind Hyg (3)
Asbest Lead (3)
Hazmat Safe (3)
Wastewtr Mgt (3)
Pro Prac Exp (1-3)

Prac Exp (3)










6-7


19-20 hrs
HSC 387 has a prerequisite of MATHS 108 or higher. BIO 313 has a prerequisite of BIO 111. NREM 385 has a prerequisite of NREM 211 or permission of the department chairperson. PHYSL 416 has the following prerequisite: BIO 111 or one semester of PHYSL; CHEM 101 or 111 and 112; or permission of the instructor. HSC 479 requires admission to the internship program; NREM 369 requires permission of the department chairperson. Health Science majors must take the HSC 479 for 6 hours for the major and an additional 3 hours forthe environmental health minor. Prerequisite for FCSFN 247 (FCSFN 110) is waived for students on this program.

MINOR IN PHYSIOLOGY, 20-21 hours

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CR HRS

ANAT
PHYSL

201
215

Fund Hum Ana
Human Physio

3
5

12-13 hours from

ANAT
PHYSL

425
411
413
414
420

Embryo/Histo (4) 
Endocrinolgy (3)
Renal Physl (3)
Cardiovsculr (3)
Neuroscience (3)





12-13


20-21 hrs
BIO 111 and one chemistry course are prerequisites to this program.

MINOR IN PUBLIC HEALTH, 22-26 hours

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CR HRS

HSC




POLS

180
387
389
479
482
350

Prn Com Hlth
Qua Meth Epi
Ins and Hlth
Prac Exp (3-9)
Environ Hlth
Pub Administ

3
4
3
3
3
3

Non-majors in health science complete 3 hours, majors in health science complete 7 hours from the following:

ANTH
BIO
ECON
FCSFN
NREM
NUR
PLAN
SOC

311
113
348
247
101
103
100
224
341

Ethnicity (3) 
Microbio HSc (5)
Health Econ (3)
Fd San Purch (3)
Env & Socy (3) 
Hlth Behav (3)
Urban Plan (2)
Family Soc (3)
Hlth Illness (3)

Any modern language (3-6)

3-7


22-26 hrs
Students must earn a minimum grade-point average of 2.5 in the minor courses in order to enroll in HSC 479.

PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY

Courses are offered that fulfill requirements for those students who are planning to apply for admission to physical therapy schools. Preprofessional counseling for this program is available in the School of Physical Education.

TEACHER EDUCATION
Teaching programs require additional courses in educational methods. The professional education courses are included in this listing. See the
Department of Educational Studies and Teachers College for the descriptions of these courses and other professional requirements of the teacher education program.

TEACHING MAJOR IN SCHOOL HEALTH
EDUCATION, 37-40 hours

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CR HRS

ANAT
HSC







EDTEC


HSC
FCSFN
PHYSL

201
160
200
261
290
363
395
396
or
350
or
365
467
240
205

Fund Hum Ana
Human Health
Intro Health
Health Sex
Eval Schl Hl
CSHP:Org Iss
Mth Mtrl H E
Hlth Com Med (2)

Curric Tech (3)

Vis Dig Lit (3)
Drug Depn Ab
Ntr Educatrs
Fund Physl

3
3
3
3
2
3
3




2-3
3
3
3

6-8 hours from
HSC




EDPSY
SOC
250
444
468
471
481
430
424
Emergncy H C (3)
Dis Mgt HP (3)
Con Hlth Iss (3)
Death Dying (3)
Stress Mang (3)
Mentl Health (3)
Family (3) 
May include one from the following

HSC

300
385
394

Hth Prom Pro (5)
Com Hl Mthds (4)
Hlth Ed Comm (3)



6-8


37-40 hrs
Students who elect SOC 424 should take SOC 100 to satisfy a University Core Curriculum social and behavioral sciences requirement and the prerequisite for SOC 424.

SENIOR HIGH, JUNIOR HIGH / MIDDLE
SCHOOL EDUCATION PROGRAM

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Professional education sequence, 39 hours

EDSEC
EDMUL
EDPSY

EDSEC
EDJHM
HSC

EDFON

150
205
251
390
380
385
363
395
420

Basic Concpt
Multi Educ
Dev Sec Ed
Educ Psychol
Prin Sec Sch
Prin Mid Sch
CSHP:Org Iss
Mth Mtrl H E
Fnds of Educ

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Student teaching

12


39 hrs
See Professional Education Assessment/ Decision Points, for additional information.

ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCE (AHSC)

200 Introduction to Patient Care. (2)
An introduction to the hospital setting and patient care. Will address patient-technologist communications, age specific needs, emergency care, and venipuncture. 
    Prerequisite: admission to the clinical phase of the radiation therapy program. 
    Parallel: AHSC 278, 279, 280, 281. 
    Open only to radiation therapy students.

201 Introduction to Radiologic Sciences and Patient Care. (3)
Introduction to the profession of radiologic science and patient care including basic concepts of patient care, interactions, communication, and clinical education. 
    Prerequisite: admission to the clinical phase of the radiography program. 
    Parallel: AHSC 224, 228, 231. 
    Open only to radiography students.

224 Radiographic Procedures 1. (3)
A comprehensive study of skeletal radiographic procedures including radiographic terminology, procedural orientation, and an in-depth description of human structure and function. 
    Prerequisite: admission to the clinical phase of the radiography program. 
    Parallel: AHSC 201, 228, 231. 
    Open only to radiography students.

225 Radiographic Procedures 2. (4)
Continuation of AHSC 224, including skeletal radiographic positioning procedures. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 201, 224, 228, 231. 
    Parallel: AHSC 229, 232. 
    Open only to radiography students.

226 Radiographic Procedures 3. (4)
Continuation of AHSC 225, including pharmacology, contrast media, and other imaging procedures. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 225, 229, 232. 
    Parallel: AHSC 230, 233. 
    Open only to radiography students.

228 Radiographic Principles 1. (3)
Introduction to radiographic principles including an overview of radiation physics, properties of radiation, biological effects, production and interaction, and radiation biology and protection. 
    Prerequisite: admission to the clinical phase of the radiography program. 
    Parallel: AHSC 201, 224, 231. 
    Open only to radiography students.

229 Radiographic Principles 2. (4)
Continuation of AHSC 228 including the study of radiographic image production, technical factors, photographic, and geometric effects. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 201, 224, 228, 231. 
    Parallel: AHSC 225, 232. 
    Open only to radiography students.

230 Radiographic Principles 3. (4)
Continuation of AHSC 229 including image production, quality control and radiographic pathology. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 225, 229, 232. 
    Parallel: AHSC 226, 233. 
    Open only to radiography students.

231 Clinic 1 Radiography. (1)
Directed learning experiences in radiographic clinical procedures through a rotational system at affiliated clinical education sites. 
    Prerequisite: admission to the clinical phase of the radiography program. 
    Parallel: AHSC 201, 224, 228. 
    Open only to radiography students.

232 Clinic 2 Radiography. (4)
Directed learning experiences in radiographic clinical procedures through a rotational system at affiliated clinical education sites. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 201, 224, 228, 231. 
    Parallel: AHSC 225, 229. 
    Open only to radiography students.

233 Clinic 3 Radiography. (4)
Directed learning experiences in radiographic clinical procedures through a rotational system at affiliated clinical education sites. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 225, 229, 232. 
    Parallel: AHSC 226, 230. 
    Open only to radiography students.

234 Clinic 4 Radiography. (2)
Directed learning experiences in radiographic clinical procedures through a rotational system at affiliated clinical education sites. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 226, 230, 233. 
    Open only to radiography students.

240 Clinic 1 Nuclear Medicine Technology. (3)
An orientation to nuclear medicine technology. Emphasizes elementary patient care procedures and professional ethics. 
    Prerequisite: admission to the clinical phase of the nuclear medicine technology program. 
    Open only to nuclear medicine technology students.

241 Clinic 2 Nuclear Medicine Technology. (3)
Introduction to patient and PET studies, nursing care, scintillation camera, and imaging in the nuclear medicine clinic. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 240. 
    Open only to nuclear medicine technology students.

242 Clinic 3 Nuclear Medicine Technology. (3)
Directed learning experiences in special areas of the nuclear medicine clinic. Introduction to related instrumentation, hot lab procedures, dose preparation, and administration. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 241. 
    Open only to nuclear medicine technology students.

243 Clinic 4 Nuclear Medicine Technology. (3)
Directed learning experiences in special areas of the nuclear medicine clinical procedures that include imaging, quality control of instrumentation, radiopharmaceuticals, and in vitro techniques. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 242. 
    Open only to nuclear medicine technology students.

245 Clinical Theory and Administration. (5)
In-depth study of the clinical theory of nuclear medicine and PET technology as it applies to examinations performed in a nuclear medicine clinic. Introduces administrative and record-keeping procedures required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the operation of a nuclear medicine clinic. 
    Prerequisite: admission to the clinical phase of the nuclear medicine technology program. 
    Open only to nuclear medicine technology students.

247 Introduction to Radioactivity. (3)
Overview of radiation physics including properties of radiation. Mechanisms and characteristics of nuclear decay and interaction of radiation with matter. 
    Prerequisite: admission to the clinical phase of the nuclear medicine technology program. 
    Open only to nuclear medicine technology students.

248 Radiopharmaceuticals. (3)
Preparation, quality control, and the diagnostic and therapeutic application of radiopharmaceuticals in the nuclear medicine and positron emission tomography clinics. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 247. 
    Open only to nuclear medicine technology students.

249 Radiation Biology and Safety. (2)
Somatic and genetic effects of radiation and the procedures for radiological control and safety. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 247. 
    Open only to nuclear medicine technology students.

251 Nuclear Medicine Instrumentation. (4)
Study of the components and performance characteristics of equipment, the mechanisms of detection and measurement of radioactive materials, and descriptive and inductive statistics used in the nuclear medicine clinic. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 247. 
    Parallel: AHSC 252. 
    Open only to nuclear medicine technology students.

252 Nuclear Medicine Instrumentation Lab. (2)
A weekly laboratory for nuclear medicine technology students enrolled in AHSC 251. 
    Parallel: AHSC 251. 
    Open only to nuclear medicine technology students.

254 Directed Research in Nuclear Medicine. (3)
Designed to offer academic credit for the completion of a scientific project. 
    Parallel: AHSC 243. 
    Open only to nuclear medicine technology students.

278 Introduction to Radiological Physics. (2)
Fundamental principles of electromagnetic radiations, mathematics of physics, x-ray properties and their production, radioactivity principles and mechanisms, radiation interactions in matter, and x-ray characteristics. 
    Prerequisite: admission to the clinical phase of the radiation therapy program. 
    Parallel: AHSC 200, 279, 280, 281. 
    Open only to radiation therapy students.

279 Radiation Biology and Protection for the Radiation Therapist. (2)
Study of the somatic and genetic biological effects on humans exposed to ionizing radiations; regulations and procedures for radiological control and safety. 
    Prerequisite: admission to the clinical phase of the radiation therapy program. 
    Parallel: AHSC 200, 278, 280. 281. 
    Open only to radiation therapy students.

280 Orientation to Radiation Therapy. (2)
Introduction to the equipment, procedures, and terminology of the radiation therapist. Will present material covering functions, responsibilities, and therapeutic treatment. 
    Prerequisite: admission to the clinical phase of the radiation therapy program. 
    Parallel: AHSC 200, 278, 279, 281. 
    Open only to radiation therapy students.

281 Clinic 1 Radiation Therapy. (2)
Directed learning experiences in basic radiation therapy treatment procedures, equipment, patient care skills, and professional ethics. 
    Prerequisite: admission to the clinical phase of the radiation therapy program. 
    Parallel: AHSC 200, 278, 279, 280. 
    Open only to radiation therapy students.

282 Radiation Oncology Physics. (3)
Basic theory of radiation therapy physics covering the fundamental concepts, properties, treatment applications, units, and terms relating to the role of the radiation therapist. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 200, 278, 279, 280, 281. 
    Parallel: AHSC 283, 284, 285. 
    Open only to radiation therapy students.

283 Oncologic Pathology 1. (3)
Didactic experience studying the principles of clinical oncology, anatomy, and malignancies. Learning experiences on the etiology, treatment, and prognosis of cancer. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 200, 278, 279, 280, 281. 
    Parallel: AHSC 282, 284, 285. 
    Open only to radiation therapy students.

284 Clinic 2 Radiation Therapy. (3)
Directed learning experiences in basic radiation therapy treatment procedures, equipment, planning, and patient interactions. One-on-one skills evaluation through rotation in various technical areas. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 200, 278, 279, 280, 281. 
    Parallel: AHSC 282, 283, 285. 
    Open only to radiation therapy students.

285 Technical Radiation Oncology 1. (3)
Basic concepts in clinical applications of patient set-ups, treatment conditions, equipment, new procedures, quality assurance, and geometric considerations. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 200, 278, 279, 280, 281. 
    Parallel: AHSC 282, 283, 284. 
    Open only to radiation therapy students.

286 Oncologic Pathology 2. (3)
Didactic experience studying the principles of clinical oncology, anatomy, and malignancies. Learning experiences on the etiology, treatment, and prognosis of cancer. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 282, 283, 284, 285. 
    Parallel: AHSC 287, 288, 289. 
    Open only to radiation therapy students.

287 Technical Radiation Oncology 2. (3)
Intermediate concepts in clinical applications of patient set-ups, treatment conditions, equipment, new procedures, quality assurance, and geometric considerations. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 282, 283, 284, 285. 
    Parallel: AHSC 286, 288, 289. 
    Open only to radiation therapy students. 

288 Treatment Planning and Dosimetry. (3)
Didactic experience providing the basic concepts of clinical radiation oncology treatment planning and dosimetry. Study fundamental procedures in dose determination, distribution, measurements, and calibration. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 282, 283, 284, 285. 
    Parallel: AHSC 286, 287, 289. 
    Open only to radiation therapy students.

289 Clinic 3 Radiation Therapy. (3)
Directed learning experiences in advanced radiation therapy treatment procedures, equipment, planning, and patient interactions. One-on-one skills evaluation through rotation in various technical areas. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 282, 283, 284, 285. 
    Parallel: AHSC 286, 287, 288. 
    Open only to radiation therapy students.

290 Clinic 4 Radiation Therapy. (2)
Directed learning experiences in advanced radiation therapy treatment procedures, equipment, planning, and patient interactions. One-on-one skills evaluation through rotation in various technical areas. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 286, 287, 288, 289. 
    Open only to radiation therapy students.

298 Special Studies in Allied Health Science. (1-3)
Designed to give associate degree students enrolled in one of the allied health programs, who exhibit special aptitude and interest, an opportunity to individually pursue special lines of scientific investigation. Experimental work, wide reading, and development of research techniques or skills. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the program director. 
    A total of 3 hours of credit may be earned.

299X Experimental/Developmental Topics. (3-6)
Topics relevant to the discipline. Course titles will be announced before each semester. 
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.

303 Introduction to Human Diseases for Respiratory Therapists. (2)
Gives respiratory therapy students a general introduction to a broad variety of human diseases. Etiology, diagnosis, and treatment will be discussed. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

311 Cardiorespiratory Physiology. (3)
Focuses on the normal anatomy and physiology of the cardiorespiratory system, including lung mechanics, ventilation, perfusion, diffusion, gas transport, and acid-base balance. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

315 Cardiorespiratory Assessment and Patient Care. (3)
Basic cardiorespiratory assessment, vital signs, laboratory studies, and charting. Includes required preclinical skills and practice. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

325 General Respiratory Care. (4)
Focuses on basic respiratory therapy procedures. Physiologic applications, effects on the cardiopulmonary system, and hazards for each therapeutic procedure are discussed. Topics include physical principles, airway care, humidity and aerosol therapy, medical gas therapy, hyperinflation therapy, and chest physical therapy. 
    Prerequisite: PHYCS 110. 
    Parallel: AHSC 326. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

326 Respiratory Care Techniques 1. (2)
Focuses on the most important clinical laboratory procedures and on procedures used by the respiratory therapist. Specifically, instructs in patient assessment, oxygen administration, humidity and aerosol therapy, chest physical therapy, hyperinflation therapy, and monitoring expired gases. 
    Parallel: AHSC 325. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

333 Cardiorespiratory Pharmacology 1. (2)
Provides an overview of the basics of pharmacologic therapeutics, focusing on dosages and solutions and bronchodilator drugs. Indications, side effects, mechanism of action, and route of administration are discussed. 
    Prerequisite: CHEM 101; BIO 113. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

350 Cardiorespiratory Diseases. (3)
Outlines general cardiorespiratory diseases of the adult, including acute and chronic disorders. Respiratory therapeutics applied to these disorders are discussed. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 311. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

355 Life Support. (3)
Includes artificial airways, monitoring, supportive therapy, principles of ventilatory care and maintenance, as well as physiologic effects and complications of airway pressure therapy. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 325. 
    Parallel: AHSC 356. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

356 Respiratory Care Techniques 2. (2)
Focuses on the most important clinical laboratory procedures and equipment used by the respiratory therapist to support critically ill patients. Specifically, instructs in mechanical ventilators, pressure and heart rate monitors, pulmonary mechanics devices, and arterial blood gas sampling. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 325, 326. 
    Parallel: AHSC 355. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

371 Pulmonary Diagnostics. (3)
Outlines and discusses both normal and abnormal lung volumes and capacities, mechanics of ventilation, inspiratory and expiratory flows, and diffusion of the lung. Additionally, specialty diagnostic techniques such as x-rays, bronchoscopy, ventilation/perfusion scans, and exercise testing are overviewed. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 355. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

385 Respiratory Care Practicum 1. (3)
Applies cardiopulmonary assessment techniques, information gathering, and communications skills in providing general respiratory care in the clinical setting, including medical gas, humidity and aerosol therapy delivery, and treatment modalities. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 325, 326. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

395 Respiratory Care Practicum 2. (4)
Introduces variations in oxygen delivery and basic mechanical ventilation. Treatment modalities and hemodynamic monitoring on mechanically ventilated patients will be integrated. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 385. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

405 Neonatal—Pediatric Respiratory Care. (3)
Outlines fetal physiology, cardiorespiratory transition, and respiratory management of neonatal pathologies, including respiratory distress syndrome. Cardiorespiratory techniques for the pediatric patient as well as pediatric trauma and transport are reviewed. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 315, 325. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

420 Introduction to Research in Respiratory Care. (2)
Examines research in respiratory care and applies basic statistics and concepts of research design. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 350. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

430 Management and Leadership for Respiratory Care. (3)
Specific theory and practice applied to directing and managing a respiratory therapy department, including the managerial functions of budgeting, controlling, organization, planning, staffing, and coordinating. Leadership and skills pertinent to these functions as well as effective communication and professionalism are included. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 355. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

440 Advanced Cardiac Life Support. (2)
Introduces the didactic and technical skills needed for successful completion of the advanced cardiac life support proficiencies set forth by the American Heart Association. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 395. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

444 Cardiorespiratory Pharmacology 2. (2)
An overview of pharmacologic agents and their effects on the various body systems. Drug effects on the respiratory, circulatory, and nervous systems are emphasized. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 333. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

445 Seminar in Cardiorespiratory Care. (3)
Specialty and expanded practice areas of emphasis for respiratory care presented in a seminar format. Emphasis will be placed on critical thinking, judgment skills, and communication abilities. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 456. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

451 Cardiorespiratory Monitoring and Special Techniques. (3)
Reviews electrocardiograms, intracranial pressure monitoring, capnography, and pulmonary artery monitoring techniques. Case studies emphasizing these special procedures are presented. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 385. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

456 Respiratory Care Practicum 3. (6)
Allows students to provide advanced patient assessment techniques, information gathering skills, and communication and leadership skills in the neonatal/pediatric and adult critical care clinical settings. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 395. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

461 Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Geriatrics. (3)
Gives an overview of rehabilitation therapies and techniques applicable to chronic lung disease, as well as respiratory home care. Basic concepts of gerontology and geriatrics are presented. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 385. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

480 Patient Education Techniques for Respiratory Therapists. (3)
Education techniques for patients and families dealing with chronic respiratory disease. Topics include asthma, COPD, and smoking cessation education. Assessment of learning readiness, reading levels, and patient comprehension will be addressed. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 461. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

485 Respiratory Care Practicum 4. (6)
Students will manage patients in critical care settings with emphasis on cardiopulmonary assessment and monitoring. Participation in pulmonary rehabilitation, homecare, advanced life support, pulmonary function, polysomnography, and other clinical specialties. 
    Prerequisite: AHSC 456. 
    Open only to respiratory therapy students.

ANATOMY (ANAT)

201 Fundamentals of Human Anatomy. (3)
Basic study of human anatomy. Emphasizes gross and functional anatomy but also includes microscopic study of selected tissues and organs. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period weekly.

299X Experimental/Developmental Topics. (3-6)
Topics relevant to the discipline. Course titles will be announced before each semester. 
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.

425 Human Embryology and Histology. (4)
Examines human development from germ cell formation to organ formation including microscopic structure of tissue and abnormal development. 
    Prerequisite: BIO 111, 112; or ANAT 201; or permission of the department chairperson.

490 Special Studies in Anatomy. (1-3)
Designed to give undergraduate anatomy students who exhibit special aptitude and interest an opportunity to pursue special lines of scientific investigation on an individual basis. Experimental work, wide reading, and development of research techniques or skills. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson. 
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term.

HEALTH SCIENCE (HSC)

160 Fundamentals of Human Health. (3)
Emphasizes life-style behaviors contributing to health promotion and disease prevention. General areas affecting health status are identified and suggestions made as to how health-related behaviors, self-care, and individual decisions contribute to wellness and influence dimensions of health. No regularly scheduled laboratory.

180 Principles of Community Health. (3)
Provides an introduction to community health concepts by examining the purpose, history, organization, functions, tools, activities, philosophy, and achievements of community health practice at the local, state, national, and international levels. Focuses on populations, settings, and special issues of community health. Includes an out of class service learning component.

200 Introduction to Health Education. (3)
Basic philosophy and practice in health education emphasizing work settings and health educator roles. Early exposure to the literature and organizations that support health education. Lab experience working with a practitioner. 
    Open only to school health education and health science majors and community health minors.

250 Emergency Health Care. (3)
Prevention and emergency procedures of various emergency health problems and injuries, including cardiac and respiratory arrest. First Aid and CPR certifications are offered. 
    Not open to students who have credit in PEP 250 or AT 340.

261 Health, Sexuality, and Family Life. (3)
Health aspects of human sexuality and family life with a focus on human reproduction, physiology of sexual response, sexual disorders and dysfunctions, sexually transmitted diseases, promotion of sexual health, and the family’s role in sex education.

290 Evaluation and Assessment in School Health. (2)
Designed as an introduction to evaluation and assessment strategies in school health. Students will examine teacher behavior, classroom management, and design of instructional materials and techniques related to school health; develop tools including rubrics for assessing student work; and participate in related field experience. 
    Prerequisite: HSC 160, 200; EDSEC 150 or SCI 150. 
    Open only to school health majors. 
    
299X Experimental/Developmental Topics. (3-6)
Topics relevant to the discipline. Course titles will be announced before each semester. 
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.

300 Health Promotion Programming. (5)
Explores the major components of planning, implementing, and evaluation of health promotion programs. 
    Prerequisite: HSC 180, 200. 
    Open only to health science majors and minors.

350 Elementary School Health Program. (3)
School’s role in promoting health and preventing disease among preschool and elementary school children. Focus on school health program (instruction, services, and environment), community resources, and health problems common to school children. No regularly scheduled laboratory. 
    Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

363 Coordinated School Health Programs: Organization and Issues. (3)
Addresses the processes and issues associated with the planning, implementing, evaluating, and organizing of a coordinated school health program in accordance with national and state guidelines. 
    Prerequisite: sophomore standing; HSC 290; HSC 261 or 467 or 471 or permission of the department chairperson.

385 Community Health Methods. (4)
Provides the skills necessary to become effective community health educators including policy development, advocacy, coalition building, grant writing, cultural competency, fund raising, and community health assessment. 
    Prerequisite: HSC 180, 200.

387 Quantitative Methods and Epidemiology. (4)
Introduction to practical applications of quantitative methods in health science. Uses of health statistics and epidemiology are explored. Weekly one-hour laboratory period emphasizes data manipulation using advanced technology. 
    Prerequisite: HSC 180 (waived for nonmajors with a minor in environmental health); MATHS 108 or higher.

389 Insects and Your Health. (3)
A survey of the diseases caused or transmitted by insects and other arthropods. Emphasizes the recognition of medically important arthropods and their biology and control. A weekly 3-hour laboratory provides an opportunity to collect and study live and preserved arthropod specimens.

390 Honors Colloquium in Health Science. (1-4)
Exploration of selected current issues in health science with an emphasis upon individualized study, reporting, and discussion. Restricted to honors students. 
    A total of 4 hours of credit may be earned.

394 Health Communication. (3)
Contemporary health communication issues, including communication strategies, models, and theories, to enhance delivery of health education programs in various settings. Micro-level (interpersonal interactions with other people) and macro-level (organizational and mass media) applications emphasized. 
    Prerequisite: HSC 180, 200.

395 Methods, Materials, and Curriculum for Teaching Health Education. (3)
Application of the roles of the health teacher in a school setting. Functions considered include needs assessment, program planning, direct instruction, evaluation, and curriculum development. 
    Prerequisite: HSC 363; completion of decision point 2.

396 Health Communication Media Production. (2)
Designed to introduce graphic design and presentation methods with direct application to various health education settings. Students will complete several creative projects using relevant electronic technology and materials. 
    Prerequisite: HSC 363 or 394 or 395.

398 Workshop in Health Science. (1-6)
Critical contemporary issues in health science. May include consultants, guest lecturers, field trips, and group activities. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson. 
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.

444 Disease Management for Health Promotion. (3)
Explores current information about infectious and non-infectious diseases from a non-clinical perspective to support the needs of health education programs in a variety of settings. 
    Prerequisite: junior status.

462 Health Promotion in the Worksite. (3)
Explores the major components of planning, implementing, and evaluation of health promotion programs. 
    Prerequisite: HSC 300 or EXSCI 301 or permission of the instructor.

464 Health Education in the Clinical Setting. (3)
Theories of client education and application of the education process to individuals and groups in health-care settings. Emphasis on the multidisciplinary team concept in planning, implementing, and evaluating client education. Application of knowledge of growth and development in meeting learning needs of clients. 
    Prerequisite: HSC 300 or permission of the instructor.

465 Alcohol Problems. (3)
A study of alcohol as a mood modifier; its use, nonuse, and abuse in drinking societies. Critical and controversial issues relevant to alcohol ingestion will be explored for medical, economic, legal, educational, historical, physiological, and public health implications.

467 Drug Dependency and Abuse. (3)
Analyzes the medical, psychological, sociological, and legal dimensions of drug use in the United States. Examines the incidence and prevalence of drug abuse together with the roles played by the school and community in dealing with this health problem.

468 Consumer Health Issues. (3)
Health services and consumer protection organizations. Analysis of fraudulent health practices and nostrums, available health care systems, and health products.

469 Health and Aging. (3)
Dynamics of later life and the aging process with specific emphasis on health. The physiological and behavioral dimensions of the aging process will be analyzed and discussed.

471 Death and Dying. (3)
Analyzes the relationship between death and health with emphasis on the physiological, medical, psychological, legal, and consumer aspects of dying in contemporary America. Investigates problems that relate to the meaning of death, care for the dying, death ritual, bereavement, and death education. 
    Prerequisite: HSC 160 or permission of the department chairperson.

472 Women and Health. (3)
General overview of issues related to women and health: health needs of working women, special nutritional concerns, the gynecological exam, reproductive anatomy and physiology, fertility and infertility, breast problems, wife abuse, and rape.

479 Practical Experience. (3-9)
Full-time internship in an approved program under departmental supervision. Students may not take additional courses during the internship experience without prior approval from the internship coordinator. 
    Prerequisite: admission to internship program. 
    A total of 6 hours of credit is earned in the health science major; 3 hours in a minor.

481 Stress Management. (3)
Aids in understanding the physiological, psychological, and sociological aspects of stress. Students will increase their awareness of the effects of stress, identify personal stress triggers, and develop strategies to minimizing stress throughout their daily lives.

482 Environmental Health. (3)
Physical environment and its relationship to disease causation. Review of environmental health problems and their solutions. Areas of study include air and water pollution, food sanitation, disposal of human excreta and waste, radiation and occupational health problems, and risk.

496 Advanced Health Communication Media Production. (3)
An immersive learning experience in which students will work in teams to produce health communication media to meet the needs of health-related organizations. Pre-production, production, and post-production processes will be used to create a tangible product. 
    Prerequisite: HSC 396 or permission of the instructor.

498 Special Studies in Health Science. (1-6)
Designed to give undergraduate health science students who exhibit special aptitude and interest an opportunity to pursue special lines of scientific investigation on an individual basis. Experimental work, wide reading, and development of research techniques or skills. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson. 
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.

499 Senior Seminar in Health Science. (1)
A culminating experience which includes assessment of the major, examination of portfolio artifacts, and pre-employment preparation. 
    Prerequisite: HSC 385, 396; senior standing. 
    Open only to health science majors.

PHYSIOLOGY (PHYSL)

205 Fundamentals of Human Physiology. (3)

Human physiology emphasizing major functions of each system. Intended for health science and school health teaching majors, science teaching majors and students entering the fields of radiography, nuclear medicine, and radiation therapy. Includes use of animals or animal tissue. 
    Prerequisite recommended: a course in biological science. 
    Not open to nursing majors, respiratory therapy majors, or to students who have credit in PHYSL 215.

215 Human Physiology. (5)
Study of cell physiology and all human body systems. Body fluid balance, acid-base balance, and temperature regulation are also covered. Group experimentation with recording apparatus. Includes use of animals or animal tissue. 
    Prerequisite: ANAT 201 and course in biology or permission of the department chairperson. 
    Prerequisite recommended: a chemistry course.

299X Experimental/Developmental Topics. (3-6)
Topics relevant to the discipline. Course titles will be announced before each semester. 
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.

411 Endocrinology. (3)
Endocrine functions in humans and mammals with special emphasis on mechanisms. Normal hormone regulation and pathophysiological principles. Laboratory experience with small-mammal surgery and endocrine testing. One three-hour laboratory period weekly. 
    Prerequisite: ANAT 201; PHYSL 210, 211; one year of general chemistry.

413 Renal Physiology. (3)
A detailed study of the urinary system and excretory functions. Emphasizes human physiology but also includes comparative vertebrate systems. Laboratory study includes gross, microscopic anatomy, and small mammal surgery. One three-hour laboratory a week. 
    Prerequisite: one course each in inorganic chemistry, anatomy, and physiology.

414 Cardiovascular Physiology. (3)
A study of the dynamics of the human cardiovascular system, stressing applications of basic physical principles and the operation of physical regulatory systems. Includes seminar-style discussion of recent literature. 
    Prerequisite: one course in physiology and one course in physics.

415 Physiology of Aging. (3)
Study of how physiological systems change with age and the mechanisms that are thought to cause these changes. Disorders and diseases of aging will also be covered. 
    Prerequisite: one course each in inorganic chemistry and physiology.

416 Human Toxicology. (3)
A survey of chemical, physical, zoological, and botanical toxicoses in human health. The implications and methodology of dealing with hazardous substances and poisons will be considered in detail. 
    Prerequisite: BIO 111 or one semester of PHYSL; CHEM 101 or 111 and 112; or permission of the instructor.

420 Neuroscience. (3)
Introductory study of the organization and function of the nervous system. Emphasizes integration of the structure and function of the nervous system. 
    Prerequisite: one year of chemistry; one year of biology or physiology.

435 Pathophysiology. (3)
The physiologic pathology of selected disease processes and dysfunctions. The pathogenesis of certain derangements with broad applicability. Underlying chemical, biological, and physical mechanisms will be studied. Laboratory experience will include demonstrations, specimen study, and visitations. One three-hour laboratory period weekly. 
    Prerequisite: a course in anatomy, physiology, and chemistry.

485 Research Techniques in Physiology. (3)
Introduction to experimental design, laboratory techniques, and data analysis and interpretation in anatomy and physiology. Laboratory will include methods employing animal preparations, modern cellular/molecular techniques, and general histological procedures. Introduction to computer data acquisition and analysis. 
    Prerequisite: one course in physiology or permission of the instructor. 
    Prerequisite recommended: CHEM 360 or 463.

490 Special Studies in Physiology. (1-3)
Designed to give undergraduate physiology students who exhibit special aptitude and interest an opportunity to pursue special lines of scientific investigation on an individual basis. Experimental work, wide reading, and development of research techniques or skills. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson. 
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term.