Undergraduate Course Catalog

Psychological Science

B. Whitley, Chairperson

Psychology is a science that studies behavior and mental processes. Psychologists study individual differences in personality and cognitive abilities, social and biological influences on behavior, and the effects of development and learning on the individual. The study of psychology can help students understand both their own motivations and the behavior of others.

The department offers a program of study that is intended to serve students with a variety of career goals. Some students seek employment immediately following graduation. Others use the major as preparation for graduate study or for a career as a high school social studies or psychology teacher. In addition to a basic understanding of psychological science in both laboratory and experiential settings, the undergraduate program is designed to promote the development of critical thinking and communication skills, technological and diversity competencies, and personal and professional ethics.

The courses students select within the major should be driven by their educational goals. Whether students intend to pursue employment or graduate study, they should utilize the services of the department’s advising center and consult with their faculty advisor regarding course selection. Their faculty advisor may also be helpful in choosing a minor that will further their professional and personal objectives.

The department offers a minor in psychology that allows students to choose courses relevant to their own areas of interest. Students interested in teaching psychology at the high school level may complete a social studies major with an area in psychology. Psychology minors and teaching majors are also encouraged to take advantage of the resources available in the department’s advising center.

MAJOR IN PSYCHOLOGY, 44 hours

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PSYSC




100
241
284
295
491
General 
Statistics 
Res Methods  
Orient Psych 
Hist Systems  

3
3
4
1
3

6 hours from
PSYSC



362
364
416
468
Motiva Emotn (3)
Learning (3)
Cognition (3)
Physiologcal (3)




6

6 hours from
PSYSC



316
317
321
432
Social Psysc (3)
Personality (3)
Develop Psy (3)
Abnormal (3)




6

3 hours from
PSYSC


324
325
424
Psych Women (3)
Prej&Discrim (3)
Diversity (3)



3

6 hours at 300- or 400-level PSYSC (no more than 3 hours from PSYSC 479, 492, 497, or 498)



6

6 hours at 400-level PSYSC (no more than 3 hours from PSYSC 479, 492, 497, or 498)


6

3 hours of PSYSC electives

3

        

44 hrs
All students will be required to take the Major Field Exam in Psychology before graduation.
At least 12 hours of PSYSC courses must be taken in residence at Ball State.
 
MINOR IN PSYCHOLOGY, 21 hours

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PSYSC

100

General

3

18 hours from electives in PSYSC

18

        

21 hrs

TEACHER EDUCATION

TEACHING MAJOR IN SOCIAL STUDIES, 57-66 hours

(See Teaching Major in Social Studies, College of Sciences and Humanities, for total requirements for this area.)
Psychology area, 15 hours

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100
493
494
General  
Teach Psy 1 
Teach Psy 2

3
1
2

3 hours from
PSYSC

367
468
Intro Biopsy (3)
Physiologcal (3)


3

3 hours from
PSYSC


362
364
416
Motiva Emotn (3)
Learning (3)
Cognition (3)



3

3 hours from
PSYSC



316
317
324
432
Social Psysc (3)
Personality (3)
Psych Women (3)
Abnormal (3)




3


15 hrs
Each student’s program of study must include at least one of the following courses: PSYSC 416, 432 or 468. Each student must satisfactorily complete a Psychological Science Teacher Education Portfolio in accordance with the standards published by the department.

PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE (PSYSC)

100 General Psychology. (3)
Introduction to various branches of psychology and the contributions of each to understanding the behavior of people as they interact with their environment.

213 The Psychology of Human Adjustment. (3)
An introduction to how people can cope more effectively with common emotional, interpersonal, and situational problems. Self-management strategies and positive coping techniques are introduced for the enhancement of personal growth and adjustment. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100.

241 Statistics. (3)
Descriptive statistics and statistics of inference. The computation, application, and interpretation of various elementary statistics. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100; core curriculum math requirement satisfied.

277 Psychology of Sexual Behavior. (3)
An examination of the determinants of human sexual behavior, focusing on the development of sexual identity and attitudes. Uses perspectives from social psychology, personality theory, and physiological psychology to build an understanding of this most complex behavior. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100.

284 Research Methods in Psychology. (4)
Introduction to the use of the scientific method in the study of human behavior. Analyze and evaluate experimental studies to gain experience with research techniques while using essential controls and acceptable procedures. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 241 with a C- or better grade; permission of the department chairperson.

295 Orientation to a Major in Psychology. (1)
Helps develop an awareness of psychology courses, minors, internships, research assistantships, and other opportunities; learn about career options and graduate school selection processes; and explore personal strengths and weaknesses with regard to long term goals. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100; permission of the department chairperson.

301 Psychology and Health. (3)
Examines how psychological conditions influence disease prevention, medical treatment, stress and coping, and psychosocial adjustment to illness. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100.

316 Social Psychology. (3)
Overview of conditions that affect a person in a social context: attitudes, impression formation, interpersonal relations, and group membership. Examines current theories and relevant research. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100.

317 Personality. (3)
Presents and compares a wide variety of classical and modern theories of personality and pertinent empirical research. Considers the components of a good theory of personality and the applications of various personality theories. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100.

321 Developmental Psychology. (3)
A survey of theory and research in perception, memory, learning, and cognition from an ontogenetic perspective. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100.

324 Psychology of Women. (3)
Explores both biological and social influences on women’s experiences, behavior, self-concepts, and psychological conflicts. Topics covered include relationships, work, gender across the lifespan, violence, health, sex-related differences, and women in the future, with an emphasis on the diversity of women’s experiences. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100.

325 Psychology of Prejudice and Discrimination. (3)
Psychological perspectives on prejudice and discrimination, including stereotyping, individual differences, the development of prejudice, social factors in prejudice, the experience of prejudice, and reducing prejudice and discrimination. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100.

342 Advanced Statistics. (3)
Inferential statistics and research design, computation and interpretation of statistics related to psychological research design. Critical analysis of published research literature. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 241.

362 Motivation and Emotion. (3)
Basic theory and research relating to motivation and emotion and applications to various facets of human behavior. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100.

364 Psychology of Learning. (3)
Nature of learning processes, possible influences upon these processes and resultant behaviors, and applications of the psychology of learning. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100.

367 Introduction to Biopsychology. (3)
Broad-based survey focusing on the methods and findings relating biological influences to behavior. Emphasizes the anatomy and functions of the nervous system, as well as other related topics that help to explain behavior. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100. 
    Not open to students who have credit in PSYSC 468.

371 Applied Behavior Analysis. (3)
Introduction to the principles of behavior analysis and application of these principles outside formal educational settings. Includes both operant and cognitive approaches. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100.

373 Industrial Psychology. (3)
Application of psychological principles to personnel selection, training, and evaluation, worker motivation and morale, leadership and supervision, job design, and workplace health and safety 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100.

395 Special Topics in Psychology. (1-9)
Surveys theory and research on a selected topic in psychology using a lecture and discussion format. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100. 
    A total of 9 hours of credit may be earned provided that no topic is repeated.

412 Sensation and Perception. (3)
Survey of theories, methods, and knowledge concerning sensory physiology, sensation, and perception. Emphasizes studies of people. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100; junior or senior standing.

415 Comparative Psychology. (3)
Investigations of current studies of animal behavior emphasizing mammals, especially primates. Human sociobiology is discussed. Topics include courtship and mating, aggression, feeding, evolutionary principles, behavior genetics, and social systems in a variety of species. 
    Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

416 Psychology of Cognition. (3)
Survey of theories and research about human thought and memory. Topics include attention, memory, problem solving, and language. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100; junior or senior standing.

424 Psychology of Diversity. (3)
Presents current knowledge and research concerning the psychological study of diversity. Consideration may be given to ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, disability, aging, and other aspects of cultural diversity, the intersection of these dimensions, and issues of societal privilege and disadvantage. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100; junior or senior standing.

432 Abnormal Psychology. (3)
Systematic study of behavior pathology. Primary emphasis on the use of theoretical perspectives and empirical data to understand the description, etiology, prognosis, treatment, and prevention of abnormal behavior. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100; junior or senior standing.

435 Survey of Clinical Psychology. (3)
Introduction to the roles and functions of personnel in clinical psychology. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100; junior or senior standing.

438 Community Mental Health. (3)
Overview of psychological disorders most likely to occur following community disasters and other traumas. Practical focus on community risk and protective factors, including professional and nonprofessional resources needed for adequate preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation of psychological disorders and other trauma sequelae. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100; junior or senior standing or permission of the department chairperson.

447 Psychological Tests and Measurements. (4)
Theoretical and practical foundations underlying the construction, use, and interpretation of standardized psychological tests and inventories. Laboratory includes development of a psychological measure. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 284.

468 Physiological Psychology. (3)
An introduction to the physical basis of behavior, involving primarily the nervous system and its structure and function. Emphasizes the role of bodily systems in perception, learning, motivation, and conscious function. 
    Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

471 Forensic Psychology. (3)
Examines the application of psychology to legal issues such as juror decision making, insanity and competency, criminal behavior, eyewitness identification, and public policy, and how forensic psychologists contribute to the growing body of knowledge in these areas. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100; junior or senior standing.

474 Organization Development. (3)
Presentation of techniques used to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of organizations. Critical examination of these techniques in the light of psychological theory and research. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100, 373; or permission of the department chairperson.

475 Advanced Industrial Psychology. (3)
Introduction to principles of staffing organizations. Emphasizes job analytic methods, recruiting, interviewing, testing, test validation strategies, utility analysis, performance appraisal, and employment discrimination. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100, 241, 373.

476 Human Factors Psychology. (3)
Explores the relation between people and the physical things in their environments. Topics include design of objects based on psychological knowledge about information display, human control, and cognitive capacities. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100, 241; or permission of the department chairperson.

479 Practical Experience. (3-6)
Monitors the progress of students participating in psychology-related settings and assists them in integrating such experiences with acquired knowledge of psychology. No more than 6 hours may be used to meet the requirements of the psychology major. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100, 241, 284, 295; at least 9 hours of PSYSC courses with a minimum PSYSC GPA of 2.50; junior or senior standing; permission of the instructor. 
    A total of 12 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 6 in any one semester or term.

491 History and Systems of Psychology. (3)
Major concepts of various schools of psychological thought and contemporary theoretical systems as they have evolved historically. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100, 241, 284, 295; senior standing.

492 Research Seminar. (1-2)
Regular meetings devoted to presentation, discussion, and writing associated with independent study projects. Students must be concurrently enrolled in PSYSC 498 under the supervision of a department faculty member. 
    Prerequisite: junior or senior standing; permission of the department chairperson. 
    A total of 3 hours of credit may be earned.

493 Teaching of Psychology 1. (1)
Students work with a PSYSC 100 instructor to develop curriculum plans, tools for the assessment of learning, and evaluation plans for an introductory psychology course. 
    Prerequisite: 3 courses in the psychology area of the social studies teaching major; permission of the department chairperson. 
    Open only to social studies teaching majors in the psychology area.

494 Teaching of Psychology 2. (2)
Students provide classroom instruction, conduct learning assessments, and conduct a study evaluating learning under the supervision of a PSYSC 100 instructor. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 493; permission of the department chairperson. 
    Open only to social studies teaching majors in the psychology area.

495 Seminar in Psychology. (3)
Investigations of topics of interest in the current literature of psychology. 
    Prerequisite: PSYSC 100; junior or senior standing. 
    Prerequisite recommended: PSYSC 241, 284.

496 International Studies in Psychology. (1-12)
International studies in psychology science at approved sites outside the United States. Credit applied to department requirements or electives as approved by the department chairperson. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson. 
    A total of 12 hours of credit may be earned.

497 Supervised Empirical Research Experience. (1-3)
Experience in the collection of behavioral data in the field or laboratory setting. Students work closely with a supervising faculty member. The credit hours may be accumulated in more than one semester. No more than 6 hours may be used to meet the requirements of the psychology major. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 
    A total of 12 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term.

498 Independent Study in Psychology. (1-3)
Topics for independent study and research to be chosen and investigated in consultation with instructors with special competence in the area involved. The credit hours may be accumulated in more than one semester. No more than 6 hours may be used to meet the requirements of the psychology major. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson. 
    A total of 12 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term. 
    
499 Department Honors in Psychology. (1-2)
Regular meetings devoted to presentation, discussion, and writing associated with completing departmental honors. This includes active participation in original research completed under the supervision of department faculty. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson. 
    A total of 3 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 2 in any one semester or term.