Undergraduate Course Catalog

Family and Consumer Sciences

S. Hji-Avgoustis, Chairperson

The mission of the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences is to prepare students who will be uniquely qualified to improving the quality of life for individuals, families, communities, and the environment in which they function. Further, the mission is to empower individuals and families across the life span to manage the challenges of living and working in a diverse, global society. This is accomplished through the integration and application of knowledge and skills from family and consumer sciences as well as a variety of other disciplines. The department values the scholarly and creative contributions of its faculty and students, as well as professional and community service.  

Students can select one of several programs or concentrations: 

  • Apparel Design. The apparel design concentration prepares students for a career in the global fashion design industry. Students develop skills in design and the construction of apparel using various techniques such as flat pattern, draping, computer-aided design, fashion illustration, and textile properties. In addition, students learn about the business side of apparel design.
  • The Family and Child Concentration. This concentration comprises of three areas, each of which facilitates careers working with families and children. Students may choose one or more of these concentrations in which to specialize within the program:
    •  Family and Child: Child Development. Child Development prepares students for careers working with young children and their families. Students attain the skills to teach or direct child development programs, work as developmental therapists, home visitors, or in other areas of the early care and education field. They have many experiential opportunities to interact with young children at the nationally accredited Child Study Center. 
    • Family and Child: Child Life. Child Life assists students in meeting the academic requirements to become a child life specialist, professionals who work in health care settings, primarily hospitals, and assist pediatric patients and their families. Students learn to apply child development and family practices to meet the needs of their target audience. Course work meets the curricular requirements defined by the Child Life Council, the certifying organization for the profession. 
    • Family and Child: Family Studies. Family Studies prepares students for careers in working with individuals and families across the life cycle. This concentration provides the opportunity for graduates to become Certified Family Life Educators (CFLE), a national certification regulated by National Council on Family Relations. Family Life Education incorporates a preventive and educational approach to individual and family issues such as communication and relationship skills, parenting education, marriage education, and diversity and other social issues related to the family. Family Studies also provides ideal preparation for students interested in pursuing advanced degrees in marriage and family counseling. 
  • Fashion Merchandising. The fashion merchandising concentration prepares students for a career in the global fashion industry as store managers, retail buyers, product developers, fashion consultants, merchandise managers, visual merchandisers, fashion forecasters, personal shoppers, and stylists. The fundamentals of promotion and marketing, retail buying, apparel manufacturing and wholesaling are covered.
  • General Family and Consumer Sciences. This concentration prepares students for careers in business, community and public agencies, government and as family policy advocates. This concentration is combined with a minor.
  • Hospitality and Food Management. This concentration provides a pathway to upper-level management positions in the hospitality industry. Course work focuses on three main hospitality sectors: (1) convention, event and meeting planning; (2) food and beverage management; and, (3) hotel operations. The program offers students a blend of theory relating to management and financial service practices with a focus on experiential learning. All majors must complete an industry immersion internship.
  • Interior Design. Accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation, the interior design concentration prepares students for entry-level positions in a variety of firms and organizations such as entertainment design, facilities management, government/institutional design, health care facility design, hospitality design, store planning, and residential design.  Students are placed in Pre-Interior Design program for the first two years. Approval to pursue Interior Design concentration requires the submission of portfolio during spring semester of sophomore year. For more information visit www.bsu.edu/interiordesign.
  • Pre-Dietetics/Dietetics (four-year program). The Didactic Program in Pre-Dietetics/Dietetics prepares students for opportunities in clinical and normal nutrition, food service systems management, and administration of community nutrition programs. The program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetic Education (CADE) of the American Dietetic Association (ADA).
  • Residential Property Management. The residential property management concentration combines aspects of housing and business, preparing students for the challenges involved in the management, marketing, and design of multifamily living environments. The program is approved by the National Apartment Association, allowing students to sit for the National Apartment Leasing Professional (NALP) and Certified Apartment Manager (CAM) exams. A residential property management minor is also available.
  • Family and Consumer Sciences Education. This program prepares individuals to teach family and consumer sciences classes in public or private schools. The focus of these classes in schools today is on family roles, child development, life skills, consumer rights and responsibilities, and community contributions. Graduates who complete this major also qualify to become extension educators or work for other public and private agencies.

In addition to the above accreditations, the entire department is accredited by the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences, and the Child Study Center is accredited by the National Academy of Early Childhood Programs.


MAJOR IN FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES (BA/BS), 63-87 hours

All family and consumer sciences majors must complete the common core and at least one of the concentrations. Students who declare a double concentration in the department will be required to complete an internship in both concentrations.

PREFIX

NO

SHORT TITLE

CR HRS

Common core, 6 hours

FCS

103
403 

Introduction to FCS
FCS in Practice 

3
3

Complete one concentration
Concentration: Apparel design, 67-70 hours

CHEM
ECON


FCFA


















MGT
MKG

100
116
or
201
101
102
202
230
265
270
275
300
303
315
350
360
365
369
410
415
480
481
497
300
300

People and Chemistry
Survey of Economic Ideas (3)

Elementary Microeconomics (3)
Dimensions of Clothing
Fund of Apparel Construction
Fit Intermed Apparel Construct
Textiles for Apparel
Fashion Illustration
The Fashion Industry
Computer Design and Present
Flat Pattern
Draping
Fashion Product Analysis
Advanced Construction
History of Costume
Fashion Designers and Forecast
Fashion Apparel (1-6)
Comp Apparel Prod Develop
Apparel Manufact and Wholesale
Studio Design
Fashion Promotion
Portfolio Dev for Fashion
Managing Behavior in Org
Principles of Marketing

3


3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3-6
3
3
3
3
1
3
3





73-76 hrs
Concentration: Family and child, 58-63 hours
Complete the following, 37 hours

FCFC









EDPS
PSYS

100
202
250 
265
275
380
393
425
484
485
351
100

Intro Family Child
Family Wellness
Family Relations 
Infant/Toddler Devlop Educ
Child Development
Parenting
Present Practice Tech Fam Educ
Grant Writing Research Methods
Family Stressors and Crises
Family Policy
Adolescent Psychology
Intro to Psychological Science

1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

FCFN

 

240
or
275 

Nutrition for Educators (3)

Personal Nutrition (3) 

3

Choose one area to complete the concentration:
Family and Child: Child development concentration, 21 hours
EDEL

FCCD
FCFC


SPCE
260
442
400
310
320
465
210
EC Curriculum and Instruction
Administration of EC Programs
Internship Child Dev (3-6)
Promot Prosocial Behav Child
Leadership Mgt Child Dev Prog
Adv Child Dev in Practice
Thry/Pract in EC Spec Ed
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
   
Family and Child: Child life concentration, 26 hours

BIO

FCCL
FCFC


HSC
NUR

100
254
400
310
465
492
471
101
103

Biology for a Modern Society
Biology in the Social Context
Internship in Child Life (3-6) 
Promot Prosocial Behav Child
Adv Child Dev in Practice
Professional Prac Child Life
Death and Dying
Termin/Health Care Prof & Cons
Health Behavior: Cult Variations

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
3

Family and Child: Family studies concentration,
21 hours

 

EDPS

SOC
FCFC

FCFS
HSC

PSYS
SOCW

355
or
431
340
475
400
261
or
277
100
230

Adult Psychology (3)

Aging and the Life Course (3)
Live Workplace Management
Marriage
Internship in Family Studies (3-6)
Health, Sex, & Family Life (3)

Psychology of Sexual Behavior (3)
Introduction to Social Work
Human Behav and Social Envr 1

3
3
3
3


3
3
3





64-69 hrs
Concentration: Fashion merchandising, 79 hours

CHEM
ECON


FCFA




  
 









FCFM
ISOM
MGT

100
116
or
201
101
102
202
230
270
280
300
315
345
360
365
415
475
481
488
497
369
125
300

People and Chemistry 
Survey of Economic Ideas (3) 

Elementary Microeconomics (3)
Dimensions of Clothing 
Fund of Apparel Construction
Fit Intermed Apparel Construct
Textiles for Apparel
The Fashion Industry
Merch Fundamentals and Math
Flat Pattern
Fashion Product Analysis
Visual Merchandising
History of Costume
Fashion Designers and Forecast
Apparel Manufact and Wholesale
International Apparel Market
Fashion Promotion
Fashion Buy Merch Ecommerce
Portfolio Dev for Fashion
Fashion Merchandising (3-6)
Micro Apps for Business
Managing Behavior in Org

3


3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
3

Students completing this concentration must complete an entrepreneurship or marketing minor. MGT 342 substitutes for MKG 300 for students taking the entrepreneurship minor.

18





85 hrs
Concentration: General, 57-71 hours

FCFA

FCFC



 


FCFN


FCGI
FCPM

 

101
102
202
265
or
275
250
340
393
110
210
275
369
104
123
235

Dimensions of Clothing
Fund of Apparel Construction
Family Wellness
Infant/Toddler Devlop Educ (3)

Child Development (3)
Family Relations
Live Workplace Management
Present Practice Tech Fam Educ
Prin Food Prep and Food Serv
Customer Service
Personal Nutrition
General Internship
Housing Decisions
Interior Design Basics
Intro to RPM

3
3
3


3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3-6
3
3
3

Minor 

 

15-26





63-77 hrs

Students completing this concentration must complete one of the following minors:
Anthropology (18-19 hours)
Business Information Technology (15 hours)
Communication Studies (21 hours)
Energy (21 hours)
Entrepreneurship (18 hours)
Environmental Context for Business (21 hours)
Environmental Management (22 hours)
Environmental Policy (24 hours)
Financial Planning (15 hours)
Food Management (18 hours)
Foundations of Business (21 hours)
Foundations of Management (21 hours)
Gerontology (21 hours)
Historic Preservation (18 hours)
Hospitality Management (22 hours)
Interpersonal Relations (15 hours)
Marketing (18 hours)
Political Science (21 hours)
Psychology of Human Development (18 hours)
Public Health (22-26 hours)
Social Work (18 hours)
Sociology (15 hours)
Spanish (15 hours)
Speech Pathology and Audiology (24 hours)
Telecommunications (24 hours)
Urban Planning and Development (20 hours)
Women’s and Gender Studies (18 hours)
Workplace Wellness (20-22 hours)
Other minors are possible, but must be approved by the family and consumer sciences general program director prior to beginning the minor.

Concentration: Hospitality and food management, 60 hours  

ACC
ECON


FCFN





   
 









FCFN

FCS
GEOG


ISOM
MGT

MKG

201
116
or
201
105
110
147
210
222
250
262
275
300
369
376
400
450
or
475
or
477
395
or
400
261
or
262
125
300
361
300

Principles of Accounting 1
Survey of Economic Ideas (3) 

Elementary Microeconomics (3)
Hospitality Foodserv Industry
Prin Food Prep and Food Serv
Foodservice Sanitation
Customer Service
Advanced Culinary Techniques
Lodging Management
Facilities Plan Layout & Des
Personal Nutrition
Cost Control Hosp & Food Ind
Food or Hospitality Internship
Intro Event Management
Restaurant Management
Strategic Lodging Operation (3)

Catering for Profit (3)

Advanced Event Management (3)
Food and Culture (3)

FCS Field Study (3-6)
Tourism Systems (3)

Tourism Regions (3)
Micro Apps for Business
Managing Behavior in Org
Managing Human Resources
Principles of Marketing

3


3
1
3
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4




3


3


3
3
3
3
3





66 hrs
Students completing this concentration are required to complete a bachelor of arts degree or a minor.
Concentration: Interior design, 81 hours    

AHS
FCID





















100
101
110
111
112
115
120
210
221
222
224
225
228
261
300
314
320
324
334
362
369
390
400
424
484

Introduction to Art
Rapid Visualization
Design Fundamentals
Graphic Communication 1
Design Presentation
Interior Materials & Appl
Graphic Communication 2
Hist and Theoretical Studies 1
Graphic Communication 3
Interior Design Studio 1
Interior Design Studio 2
Hist and Theoretical Studies 2
Graphic Communication 4
Universal Design
ID Professional Practice
Color and Light in ID
Furniture Design
Interior Design Studio 3
Interior Design Studio 4
Inter Construction & Detailing
Internship in Interior Design (1-5)
Interior Design Programming
NCIDQ Preparation
Interior Design Studio 5
Interior Design Studio 6

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
3
1
3
3

6 hours from

ACC
ACR

AFA
ARCH

ECON
FCID
MKG
TCST


TDPT

201
221
231
101
100
329
116
220
300
104
180
250
299X

Principles of Accounting 1 (3)
Introduction to Metals (3)
Introduction to Glass (3)
Drawing 1 (3)
Introduction to Architecture (2)
History of Architecture 2 (3)
Survey of Economic Ideas (3)
Sustainable Interiors (3)
Principles of Marketing (3)
Introduction to Construction (3)
Construction Documents (3)
Construction Methods Matls 1 (3)
Experimental Development Topic (3 or 6)

 










6




87 hrs
Students are placed in pre-interior design program for the first two years. All pre-interior design students are required to participate in Portfolio Review during the second semester of the second year to be admitted to the 300-level courses and higher. Students will be admitted to the interior design program, upon successful completion of the review. See interior design Web site for more details. A grade of C or better is required in all required courses with the exception of AHS 100 and FCS core courses. Students with grade of C- or lower need to retake the course. Students may not progress through the program until they satisfy the requirements. 
Concentration: Residential property management, 63-66 hours  

ACC
ECON


FCFN
FCPM













MGT
MKG
RE
TDPT

201
116
or
201
210
104
123
235
275
305
315
330
350
369
375
400
405
425
435
300
300
230
213

Principles of Accounting 1
Survey of Economic Ideas (3)

Elementary Microeconomics (3)
Customer Service
Housing Decisions
Interior Design Basics
Intro to RPM
Market Leasing Resident Prop
Maintenance for Prop Mgr
Sr Housing: Design, Mkg, & Mgt
Apt Financial Management
Residential Equip, Energy Tech
RPM Internship
Simulation in RPM
Housing & Society
Mgt of Gov Assisted Housing
RPM Project
Trends Issues in RPM
Managing Behavior in Org
Principles of Marketing
Real Estate Principles
Int Const Mat Pro Prod

3


3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3-6
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3





69-72 hrs

Students pursuing the residential property management concentration must meet the following additional requirements:

  • Grade of C or better in FCPM 275, 369, and 425.
  • Sit for the National Apartment Leasing Professional (NALP) and Certified Apartment Manager (CAM) exams.

MAJOR IN PRE-DIETETICS/DIETETICS (BA/BS), 92 hours

The Department of Family and Consumer Sciences offers a baccalaureate degree in dietetics that is fully accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. To pursue this program, students must have sufficient mathematical preparation to meet the prerequisite for required chemistry courses (two years of high school algebra or successful completion of MATH 108). Students pursuing a baccalaureate degree in dietetics must begin their academic career as a pre-dietetics major. Students will apply into the dietetics major in the spring semester of the second year, or as required courses are completed. Please refer to the Dietetics Program Director for full program requirements and program admission criteria.

PREFIX

NO

SHORT TITLE

CR HRS

Family and consumer sciences
Common core, 6 hours 
 
FCS
103
403
Introduction to FCS
FCS in Practice
3
3
 
Pre-dietetics core, 37 hours
ANAT
CHEM



FCFN


PHYS
PSYS
201
111
112
231
360
101
110
340
215
100
241
Fundamentals of Human Anatomy
General Chemistry 1
General Chemistry 2
Organic Chemistry 1
Essentials of Biochemistry
Introduction to Dietetics
Prin Food Prep and Food Serv
Prin of Human Nutrition
Human Physiology
Intro to Psychological Science
Statistics
3
4
4
4
4
1
3
3
5
3
3
 
Dietetics courses, 49 hours
BIO
FCFN












MGT
113
147
220
345
346
350
363
395
396
400
446
447
455
456
300
Microbiology for Health Sci
Foodservice Sanitation
Meal Design and Presentation
Macronutrients
Micronutrients and Phytochem
Technology of Food Science
Admin of Food and Nutr Systems
Food and Culture
Nutrition Counseling Practicum
Restaurant Management
Medical Nutrition Therapy 1
Medical Nutrition Therapy 2
Lifecycle Nutrition
Community Nutrition
Managing Behavior in Org
5
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
FCFN Elective 3
        

92 hrs

MINOR IN FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES, 21 hours

PREFIX

NO

SHORT TITLE

CR HRS

FCFN
FCS

110
103  

Prin Food Prep and Food Serv
Introduction to FCS

3
3

6 hours from

FCFA

FCPM

101
270
104

Dimensions of Clothing (3)
The Fashion Industry (3)
Housing Decisions (3)

6

3 hours from  

FCFN

240
275
340

Nutrition for Educators (3)
Personal Nutrition (3)
Prin of Human Nutrition (3)

 

 3

6 hours from  

FCFC





202
250
265
275
340
450
475

Family Wellness (3)
Family Relations (3)
Infant/Toddler Devlop Educ (3)
Child Development (3)
Life Workplace Management (3)
Consumer Education (3)
Marriage (3)

 

6





21 hrs

MINOR IN FASHION, 18 hours

PREFIX

NO

SHORT TITLE 

CR HRS 

FCFA


101
230
270
365

Dimensions of Clothing
Textiles for Apparel
The Fashion Industry
Fashion Designers and Forecast

3
3
3
3

6 hours from  

FCFA


265
345
360
481

Fashion Illustration (3)
Visual Merchandising (3)
History of Costume (3)
Fashion Promotion (3)

 

 
6





18 hrs
Not open to students in apparel design or fashion merchandising concentrations. Students should take CHEM 100 for the University Core Curriculum to satisfy the prerequisite for FCFA 230. 

MINOR IN FOOD MANAGEMENT, 18 hours

PREFIX

NO

SHORT TITLE 

CR HRS 

FCFN





105
110
147
220
275
400
475

Hospitality Foodserv Industry
Prin Food Prep and Food Serv
Foodservice Sanitation
Meal Design and Presentation
Personal Nutrition
Restaurant Management
Catering for Profit

1
3
1
3
3
4
3





18 hrs

MINOR IN HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT, 22 hours

PREFIX

NO

SHORT TITLE 

CR HRS 

ACC
FCFN





201
105     
210
250
300
376
450
477

Principles of Accounting 1
Hospitality Foodserv Industry
Customer Service
Lodging Management
Cost Control Hosp & Food Ind
Intro Event Management
Strategic Lodging Operation
Advanced Event Management

3
1
3
3
3
3
3
3





22 hrs

MINOR IN INTERIOR DESIGN, 22-24 hours

PREFIX

NO 

SHORT TITLE 

CR HRS 

FCID



ARCH
FCID

101
110
111
or
261
115
222

Rapid Visualization
Design Fundamentals
Graphic Communication 1 (3)

Design Communications Media (1)
Interior Materials & Appl
Interior Design Studio 1

3
3


1-3
3
3

9 hours from  
FCID





112
120
210
221
224
225
261
Design Presentation (3)
Graphic Communication 2 (3)
Hist and Theoretical Studies 1 (3)
Graphic Communication 3 (3)
Interior Design Studio 2 (3)
Hist and Theoretical Studies 2 (3)
Universal Design (3)






9




22-24 hrs
For architecture majors, ARCH 201 will substitute for FCID 222. Students electing FCID 225 should complete FCID 210 to satisfy the prerequisite.     
    Open only by permission. Students completing this minor must receive C or better grades in all program-required courses. Students receiving a grade lower than are required to retake the course. 

MINOR IN RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, 21 hours

PREFIX

NO

SHORT TITLE 

CR HRS 

FCPM


104     
235
275
305
Housing Decisions
Intro to RPM
Market Leasing Resident Prop
Maintenance for Prop Mgr
3
3
3
3
6 hours from  

FCFN
FCPM


210
123
315
350
405

Customer Service (3)
Interior Design Basics (3)
Sr Housing: Design, Mkg, & Mgt (3)
Residential Equip, Energy Tech (3)
Mgt of Gov Assisted Housing (3)

6

3 hours from  
ACC
ECON


MGT
MKG
RE
TDPT
201
116
or
201
300
300
230
213
Principles of Accounting 1 (3)
Survey of Economic Ideas (3)

Elementary Microeconomics (3)
Managing Behavior in Org (3)
Principles of Marketing (3)
Real Estate Principles (3)
Int Const Mat Pro Prod (3)







3




21 hrs

Students pursuing the Minor in Residential Property Management must meet the following additional requirements: 

  • Grade of C or better in FCPM 275. 
  • Sit for the National Apartment Leasing Professional (NALP) exam.

TEACHER EDUCATION

Teaching programs require additional courses in educational methods. The professional education courses are included in this listing. See the Department of Educational Studies and Teachers College for the descriptions of these courses and other professional requirements of the teacher education program. 

TEACHING MAJOR IN FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES (BA/BS), 54 hours

PREFIX

NO 

SHORT TITLE 

CR HRS 

FCED


FCFA


FCFC



FCFN




FCPM


FCS

150
492
493
101
102
230
202
250
275
340
110
220
275
or
340
104
123
350
103       
403

Basic Concept Second Ed in FCS
Implementation of FCED Programs
Cooperative Programs in FCED
Dimensions of Clothing
Fund of Apparel Construction
Textiles for Apparel
Family Wellness
Family Relations
Child Development
Live Workplace Management
Prin Food Prep and Food Serv
Meal Design and Presentation
Personal Nutrition (3)

Prin of Human Nutrition (3)
Housing Decisions
Interior Design Basics
Residential Equip, Energy Tech
Introduction to FCS
FCS in Practice

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3


3
3
3
3
3
3





54 hrs
CHEM 100 as a prerequisite for FCFA 230 and FCFN 340 is waived. 

SENIOR HIGH, JUNIOR HIGH/MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATION PROGRAM

PREFIX

NO

SHORT TITLE 

CR HRS 

Professional education sequence, 33 hours

EDFO
EDJH
EDMU
EDPS

EDRD
EDSE

420
385
205
251
390
320
380

Soc, Hist, Phil Found of Ed
Prin of Tchng in Mid Schl
Intro to Multicul Ed
Development Secondary
Educational Psychology
Disciplinary Literacy Elem Sch
Princ of Tchng in Sec School

3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Student teaching 12




33 hrs
See Professional Education Assessment/Decision Points for additional information.

CERTIFICATE IN APARTMENT MANAGEMENT, 24 hours

PREFIX 

NO

SHORT TITLE

CR HRS

ACC
FCFN
FCPM




RE

201
210
104
235
275
305
405
332

Principles of Accounting 1
Customer Service
Housing Decisions
Intro to RPM
Market Leasing Resident Prop
Maintenance for Prop Mgr
Mgt of Gov Assisted Housing
Legal Aspects of Real Estate

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

     
24 hrs 
The Certificate in Apartment Management is not open to students pursuing a major or minor in residential property management. 

CERTIFICATE IN FACILITIES MANAGEMENT, 24 hours

PREFIX 

NO

SHORT TITLE

CR HRS

ACC
FCFN
FCPM

ISOM
MGT
TCST

201    
210
255
305
125
271
104
180

Principles of Accounting 1
Customer Service
Facilities Management
Maintenance for Prop Mgr
Micro Apps for Business
Intro Organizational Behavior
Introduction to Construction
Construction Documents

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

     
24 hrs


FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES: CHILD DEVELOPMENT (FCCD)

400 Internship in Child Development (3-6)
Provides the opportunity for the student to work in an internship setting to gain professional experience in child development.         
    Prerequisite: FCFC 465 and permission of the department chairperson.         
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.                 
    Open only to child development students.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES: CHILD LIFE (FCCL)

400 Internship in Child Life (3-6)
Provides internship experience for child life specialist students under the supervision of a child life specialist.         
    Prerequisite: FCFC 465 and permission of the department chairperson.         
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.                 
    Open only to child life students.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES: EDUCATION (FCED)

150 Basic Concepts of Secondary Education in Family and Consumer Sciences (3)
Designed to help students make valid decisions about preparing for and functioning in family and consumer science teaching careers. Professionalism, job requirements, employment opportunities, secondary school curricula, and the role of secondary education within the entire educational process are discussed.

392 Principles and Philosophy of Vocational Education (3)
Applies the principles and philosophies of vocational education to program organization, content area, teacher qualifications, leadership preparation, curriculum design, and image.

395 Methods and Materials for Teaching Family and Consumer Sciences (5)
Organization of teaching units and lesson plans; selection and use of teaching methods and materials.
    Prerequisite: identification to pursue a teaching curriculum.
    Prerequisite recommended: EDSE 380.

490 Practicum in Family and Consumer Sciences Education (1-3)
Individual or group studies and experiences. Experience with professional standards, regulations, and supervision in the work related to family and consumer sciences chosen by the student.
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson.
    A total of 9 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term.

492 Implementation of Family and Consumer Sciences Education Programs (3)
Emphasizes techniques for implementing vocational education programs, including applications to management, public relations, and professionalism in vocational family and consumer sciences.         
    Open only to family and consumer science education majors.  

493 Coordination of Cooperative Programs in Vocational Education (3)
Coordination of class instruction and work experience. Includes recruiting, selecting, and evaluating students; selecting training stations; working with an advisory committee; role of coordinator; techniques and legal concerns of coordination; and placement and follow-up of graduates.                 
    Open only to family and consumer science education majors.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES: FASHION APPAREL (FCFA)

101 Dimensions of Clothing (3)
Analysis of dress and adornment emphasizing dimensions that affect the design and end uses of textiles and clothing.

102 Fundamentals of Apparel Construction (3)
Basic knowledge of garment construction, clothing selection, and art principles as applied to clothing.

202 Fitting and Intermediate Apparel Construction (3)
Study of garment fit: recognition and implementation of fit to patterns and garments. Learning and application of intermediate garment construction skills.
    Prerequisite: FCFA 102.

230 Textiles for Apparel (3)
Study of textiles and their components (fiber, yarn, fabric, and finishes) as they relate to care, performance, quality, and customer satisfaction.
    Prerequisite: CHEM 100.

265 Fashion Illustration (3)
Provides basic knowledge of drawing of the fashion figure and of fashion illustration.

270 The Fashion Industry (3)
A survey of the business of fashion through design, manufacture, distribution, and promotion. Explores career possibilities.
    Open to all students.

275 Computerized Apparel Design and Presentation (3)
Provides knowledge and skills in use of the common industry computer software for apparel and textile product design and presentation.                 
    Prerequisite: FCFA 102 and 265.

280 Merchandising Fundamentals and Mathematics (3)
Study of fundamental quantitative issues related to fashion merchandising and retail management. Covers the basic mathematical computation used in the retail and wholesale markets. Incorporates computer skills used in fashion merchandising and retail management.
    Prerequisite: ISOM 125.

300 Flat Pattern (3)
Adapting standard patterns to individual proportions, designing garments, and creating an original garment by the flat pattern method. Use of computer-aided design to produce pattern for original garment.                 
    Prerequisite: FCFA 202.

303 Draping (3)
Provides basic knowledge of apparel design using the draping method.                 
    Prerequisite: FCFA 202.

304 Grading and Marking for Apparel Design (3)
Provide basic knowledge of product processes of grading and marking for apparel. Computer grading and marker generation will be emphasized.
    Prerequisite: FCFA 300.

315 Fashion Product Analysis (3)
Study of factors which contribute to the quality of fashion-related merchandise. Provides an opportunity to become skillful in evaluating the materials and construction quality and techniques used in the textile and apparel industry.                 
    Prerequisite: FCFA 101 and 102 and 230 and 270.

345 Visual Merchandising (3)
Study of visual merchandising presentations and sales promotion in fashion retailing and wholesaling. Basic principles of design, as applied to visual merchandising, are examined.
    Prerequisite: FCFA 101, 270.

350 Advanced Construction (3)
Students will recognize characteristics typifying high quality tailored garments and produce garments using advanced construction techniques. Application of appropriate techniques to construct a tailored garment. Provides experience in working in design and production teams.                 
    Prerequisite: FCFA 300 or 303.

360 History of Costume (3)
A study of Western costume from its beginning to the present. Emphasis on motivating influences of each period as well as on the costume itself.
    Prerequisite: FCFA 101, 230; or permission of the department chairperson.

365 Study of Fashion Designers and Forecasting (3)
Study of present and historical fashion designers from around the world. Emphasis on understanding their contributions to the fashion industry and their influence in today’s fashion markets. Provides an overview of the use of fashion forecasting to interpret fashion design.
    Prerequisite: FCFA 101, 270.

369 Internship in Fashion Apparel Design (1-6)
Provides the opportunity for the student to work in an established internship setting to gain professional experience in one's specific area of study. 
    Prerequisite: FCFA 303 or 401; MKG 300; permission of the department chairperson. 
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.

410 Computerized Apparel Product Development (3)
Provides advanced knowledge of the use of computer skills in product development. Integration of design development skills in apparel design and illustration, apparel product prototype development, and presentation using industry software. Another topic covered is grading.                 
    Prerequisite: FCFA 275, and 300 or 303.

415 Apparel Manufacturing and Wholesaling (3)
Study of garment manufacturing and the decision-making process involved in producing, marketing, and merchandising apparel and other fashion-related products.                 
    Prerequisite: MKG 300 or MGT 342 and FCFA 300. 

475 International Apparel Markets (3)
Provides an overview of the global textile and apparel industries. Considers the U.S. textile complex and market within an international context.
    Prerequisite: FCFA 230 and 270; and MKG 300 or MGT 342.

480 Studio Design: Senior Line (3)
Students will take on the role of a fashion designer through the conceptualization of ideas, to design components, to production, to presentation of their original line. Students will have the opportunity to develop their personal and professional design philosophy.                 
    Prerequisite: FCFA 300 and 303 and 350.

481 Fashion Promotion (3)
Study of promotional strategies used by fashion retailers and manufacturers. Emphasis on application of promotional strategies.
    Prerequisite: junior standing; FCFA 270; FCFA 480 for apparel design students.

488 Fashion Buying, Merchandising and E-Commerce (3)
Gives potential fashion retailers the knowledge base to make decisions on buying and merchandising in various retail environments (e.g. store, catalog, e-commerce) to satisfy the customer and to maintain an adequate profit level. Demonstrates mathematical and computer skills in buying and merchandising.
    Prerequisite: FCFA 280 and 415; and MGT 300; and MKG 300 or MGT 342.

497 Portfolio Development for Fashion (1)
Provides the opportunity to compile a portfolio of design work and/or projects to be used for a job interview.
    Prerequisite: FCFA 415; FCSFA 480 for apparel design students.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES: FAMILY AND CHILD (FCFC)

100 Introduction to Family and Child (1)
An overview and analysis of the family and child field, including discussion of academic requirements, career opportunities, and ethical standards in each of the three areas: Child Development, Child Life, and Family Studies.

202 Family Wellness (3)
Investigates the dimensions of wellness, focusing on the interaction of these with the individual, family, and community. Identifies healthy family practices emphasizing potential and resiliency.

250 Family Relations (3)
Focuses on family dynamics and interaction across a variety of family structures and backgrounds. Explores the impact of larger social systems on the family, changing concepts of family, and family processes throughout the life cycle. Emphasizes healthy interaction patterns and skills to strengthen family relationships.

265 Infant/Toddler Development and Education (3)
Growth and development from conception through the third year of life emphasizing how children learn. Includes physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development. Students interact with and observe infants and toddlers in laboratory setting. Students implement developmental exercises and activities.

275 Child Development (3)
Students will study physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development of young children ages 3-8. Students will also participate in, observe, and complete assignments in a preschool laboratory setting utilizing developmentally appropriate practices.

310 Promoting Prosocial Behavior in Young Children: Guidance and Cultural Factors (3)
Students will study the research-based theories and practices of developmentally appropriate guidance as applied to early care and education settings. Students will examine the relationship between family, community, and care and will develop an understanding of anti-bias and multiculturalism as applied to child development. 
    Prerequisite: FCFC 100.

320 Leadership and Management in Child Development Programs (3)
Examine leadership and administrative issues that students will face in early care and education settings, including center-based full and part-day programs, Head Start, and family childcare options.
    Prerequisite: FCFC 265 or 275.

340 Life and Workplace Management (3)
Application of management principles to achieve life and workplace goals and responsibilities. Emphasis on use of resources, technology, effective communication, and management to diminish stress.

380 Parenting (3)
Researched-based parenting practices supporting the positive development of children in diverse families throughout the life cycle.
    Prerequisite: FCFC 250.

393 Presentations, Practices and Techniques for Family Life Education (3)
Development of techniques for presentations and projects meeting the needs of diverse audiences in family and consumer sciences. Includes participation in use of methods, development, evaluation, and techniques for varied environments.
    Not open to teaching majors in family and consumer sciences.

425 Grant Writing and Research Methods (3)
Focusing on the family and child disciplines, students will learn the research process, from developing research questions to analyzing data and interpreting results. Students will explore the grant writing process and methods for finding funding sources.
    Prerequisite: FCFC 250.

450 Consumer Education (3)
Economic considerations of purchasing and planning for consumers. Includes current consumer legislation, marketing conditions, influence of advertising, consumer credit, agencies that protect consumers, financial planning, e-commerce, and points to consider as consumers.
    Open to all students.

465 Advanced Child Development in Practice (3)
Faculty-guided professional experience working with young children in a developmentally appropriate early care environment. Students complete 200 hours, including attending weekly staff and monthly training meetings at the Child Study Center. 
    Prerequisite: FCFC 265 or 275.

475 Marriage (3)
Relationship dynamics and contemporary changes to the institution of marriage. Emphasizes the individual within marriage, dating, mate selection, relationship maintenance, communication, sexual adjustment, marriage dissolution, and marital growth.
    Open only to juniors and seniors or by permission of the department chairperson.

484 Family Stressors and Crises (3)
Focuses on stressors individuals and families experience across the life cycle and methods of coping. Teaches skills in professional ethics and boundaries when working with or educating families. 
    Prerequisite: FCFC 250; junior or senior standing or permission of the department chairperson.

485 Family Policy (3)
Explores policy at the local, state, and federal levels and its impact on family life. Students will assess the effectiveness of policies and programs from a family perspective, learn about the policymaking process, and critically examine different roles professionals can play in influencing policy development.
    Prerequisite or parallel: FCFC 250 or permission of the department chairperson.

491 Child Study Center Administrative Practicum (3)
Guided professional immersive learning experience working in the administrative office of a child-centered environment. Students complete 200 hours including weekly staff and monthly training meetings at the Child Studies Center.
    Prerequisite: FCFC 100, 265 or 275, and 320.
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term.

492 Professional Practices in Child Life (3)
Students will learn clinical and professional practices required to work in the child life field, including the history of the child life profession, ethics in child life, interventions, and healing environments in family-centered care.

496 Seminar in Family Relations (1-3)
History and recent trends and developments in family-life education, career opportunities involved in family-life education, professional organizations, and ethical standards.
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson and junior or senior standing.
    A total of 3 hours of credit may be earned.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES: FASHION MERCHANDISING (FCFM)

369 Internship in Fashion Merchandising (3-6)
Provides the opportunity for the student to work in an established internship setting to gain professional experience in one's specific area of study.
    Prerequisite: FCFA 280 or 345 and MKG 300 or MGT 342 and permission of the department chairperson.
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES: FOODS AND NUTRITION (FCFN)

101 Introduction to Dietetics (1)
Topics dealing with the profession of dietetics; roles and responsibilities of dietetic practitioners; professional standards and code of ethics; legislative issues related to health care; career and continuing education opportunities; marketing of dietetic services; and current trends and issues.         
    Open only to pre-dietetics and dietetics majors.  

105 Hospitality and Foodservice Industry (1)
An overview of the hospitality and foodservice profession. An in-depth analysis of the industry including diversity and challenges, the academic preparation required, identification of the role of the hospitality and foodservice manager, and the multiple career options.                 
    Open only to hospitality and food management majors and food management and hospitality management minors.

110 Principles of Food Preparation and Food Science (3)
Introduces the principles of food preparation and food science. Correct techniques and methods of food preparation are stressed.

147 Foodservice Sanitation (1)
Identify foodborne illness, how to prevent it, and how to train employees in food sanitation procedures. Legal issues pertaining to the Indiana health codes will be emphasized. Become eligible to take the National Restaurant Association manager's sanitation certification examination (Servsafe).  

210 Customer Service (3)
Concentrates on building quality service skills and knowledge needed to foster excellent customer relations.

220 Meal Design and Presentation (3)
Fundamentals of planning, preparing, and serving nutritionally adequate, appetizing, and aesthetically appealing meals with emphasis on resource management. Attention given to foods and types of table service suitable for various occasions and the use of computers in foodservice.
    Prerequisite: FCFN 110.

222 Advanced Culinary Techniques and Menu Design (3)
Fundamentals of planning, preparing, and serving financially responsible, appetizing and aesthetically appealing meals in a commercial kitchen environment. Attention is given to foods and learning the fundamentals of using commercial food preparation equipment and the use of computers in food service.         
    Prerequisite: FCFN 110.         
    Not open to students who have credit in FCFN 220.
    Open only to hospitality and food management majors.                   

240 Nutrition for Educators (3)
General principles of nutrition as related to growth, development, and health of the infant, child, adolescent, and adult. Classroom application and integration of strategies.
    Not open to students who have credit in FCFN 275 or 340.

250 Lodging Management (3)
Examines the departmental structure of hotel operations along with the duties, responsibilities, and challenges of hospitality management within the hotel industry.         
    Open only to hospitality and food management majors and hospitality management minors.  

262 Facilities Planning, Layout and Design (3)
Fundamentals of planning, layout, purchasing, and use of equipment and space for all aspects of the hospitality industry including food service operations.

275 Personal Nutrition (3)
Emphasizes the principles of nutrition and their application to daily living. The relationship between diet and health, the role of nutrition in reducing individual health risk, and contemporary issues in nutrition will be discussed. Core Transfer Library: Health and Physical Education (IHP 1402)
    Not open to students who have credit in FCFN 240 or 340.

300 Cost Control in Hospitality and Food Industry (3)
Controlling costs from a management perspective in the hospitality and foodservice industry.
    Prerequisite or parallel: ACC 201.

340 Principles of Human Nutrition (3)
Addresses the principles of nutrition, life cycle nutrition, and the relationship of diet to health and disease.
    Prerequisite or parallel: CHEM 100 or 101 or 111 or permission of the department chairperson.

345 Macronutrients (3)
Introduces metabolic pathways, cellular metabolism, and various energy systems of the human body. Emphasizes the digestion, metabolism, transport, and excretion of macronutrients.         
    Prerequisite: CHEM 360 and FCFN 340 and PHYS 215. 
    Open only to those admitted to the dietetics major.  

346 Micronutrients and Phytochemicals (3)
Emphasizes the roles of micronutrients in the human body, introduces micronutrient functions in a healthy population and response in times of deficiency. Discusses the role of micronutrients and other food constituents in the prevention of chronic illness.         
    Prerequisite: CHEM 360 and FCFN 340 and PHYS 215.       
    Open only to those admitted into the dietetics major.  

350 Technology of Food Science (3)
Scientific evaluation of the behavior of food and its qualitative and quantitative properties. Overview of the food industry, food technology, biotechnology, and federal regulation related to food supply. Review of research and marketing practices of bioengineered food and dietary supplements.         
    Prerequisite: FCFN 220 and PSYS 241.         
    Open only to those admitted into the dietetics major.  

363 Administration of Food and Nutrition Systems (3)
A systems approach to foodservice management theories, concepts, and functions for integrated health care, public institutions, and nutrition care operations. Emphasizes the operational functions of purchasing, production, and administration of food and nutrition services.  

369 Internship in Food or Hospitality Management (3)
Provides the opportunity for the student to work in an established internship setting to gain professional experience in one's specific area of study.         
    Prerequisite: FCFN 147 and 210 and 250 and 376 or 400; documented experience of at least 300 hours in a food, event/meeting, or hotel establishment, and an additional 100 hours of customer service either directly or indirectly related to the hospitality industry. Hours must have been accumulated within prior 4 years. Documented attendance of internship meeting prior to registering for the course, and permission of HFM program director or department chairperson.                 
    Open only to hospitality and food management majors.

375 Nutrition Assessment, Counseling, and Education (3)
Assessment methods, techniques of nutrition counseling, education principles and implementation, and development of counseling materials. Includes assessment of various populations and counseling experiences.
    Prerequisite: FCFN 340.

376 Introduction to Event Management (3)
An introduction to the management of special events including conventions, professional, and social meetings. Emphasis on fiscal responsibilities, logistics, and space allocation.                 
    Open only to hospitality and food management majors and hospitality management minors.

395 Food and Culture (3)
Explores the relationships between agricultural practices, diet patterns, food procurement and distribution, nutrition, and religious dietary doctrines from a national and global perspective. Emphasis on how culture, national and international policies, and belief systems shape food consumption patterns. 
    Prerequisite: FCFN 240 or 275, or 340.

396 Nutrition Counseling Practicum (3)
Individual counseling methods; behavior change theories; basic dietary, biochemical, and anthropometric assessment; and multi-culture customs and food practices. Application of theory and counseling skills in various community settings focusing on student's areas of interest. Thirty hours in-class; thirty hours supervised practicum. On-site experiences supervised and evaluated by a registered dietitian.         
    Prerequisite: FCFN 345 or permission of the department chairperson.  

400 Restaurant Management and Quantity Food Production (4)
Principles and processes of quantity food production and commercial kitchen equipment use are utilized. Focus on mastering skills related to quantity food production, distribution, storage, and service. Fiscal fundamentals related to restaurant operations are taught. Theory application is demonstrated through student-run operations of the Allegre Restaurant.         
    Prerequisite: FCFN 147 and 220 or 222.  

444 Sports Nutrition and Weight Control (3)
A study of the unique nutrition needs of athletes' physically active populations. Presents the scientific basis for sports nutrition emphasizing concepts such as energy intake and timing, calorie expenditure and balance, and nutrition strategies to improve athletic performance and body composition.                
    Prerequisite: FCFN 340.

445 Advanced Nutrition (3)
Emphasizes the use and metabolism of nutrients at the cellular level in the human body. Significance and interpretation of current research in the field of nutrition is discussed.
    Prerequisite: CHEM 360; FCFN 340; senior standing.
    Prerequisite or parallel: ACC 201.

446 Medical Nutrition Therapy 1 (3)
Medical nutritional therapy principles and intervention strategies for the routine management of chronic diseases in at-risk individuals or populations. Application of nutrition assessment principles to diagnose chronic diseases in clinical settings. Pathophysiology of chronic illness. Includes some clinical experiences.
    Prerequisite or parallel: FCFN 346, 396.

447 Medical Nutrition Therapy 2 (3)
Medical nutritional therapy principles and intervention strategies for management of critical and chronic illness and metabolic distress. Pathophysiology of disease progression and traumatic illness.         
    Prerequisite: FCFN 446.  

450 Strategic Operation in Lodging Industry (3)
Examines current practices and business strategies implemented by lodging companies along with contemporary issues in the lodging industry.         
    Prerequisite: FCFN 250.  

455 Lifecycle Nutrition (3)
Involves the study of special nutritional needs, physiology, and health concerns of pregnant and lactating women, infants, children, adolescents, women of child-bearing age, and older adults.                 
    Prerequisite: FCFN 346 or permission of the department chairperson.

456 Community Nutrition (3)
Overview of community nutrition and nutrition education. Analysis of biological, economic, social, cultural, and policy issue affecting a community’s nutritional status. Emphasis on federal food and nutrition programs and policy implications at the state and local level. Observation and participation in local nutrition programs.
    Prerequisite: FCFN 455.

475 Catering for Profit (3)
Fundamentals of planning, organizing, preparing, and serving profitable and unique catering functions. Emphasizes menu development, customer service, marketing, and food production.                 
    Prerequisite: FCFN 147 and 220 or 222.

477 Advanced Event Management (3)
Exploration of principles of management relating to special events, meetings, exhibits, catered functions and their intra-industry interaction.
    Prerequisite: FCFN 376.

496 Seminar in Foods and Nutrition (1-6)
Presentations and discussions on specific topics of current interest in foods and nutrition.
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson.
    A total of 9 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 6 in any one semester or term.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES: FAMILY STUDIES (FCFS)

400 Internship in Family Studies (3-6)
Provides the opportunity for the student to work in an established internship setting to gain professional experience in working with families.         
    Prerequisite: FCFC 250 and 393 and permission of the department chairperson.                 
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES: GENERAL (FCGI)

369 FCS General Internship (3-6)
Provides the opportunity for the student to work in an established internship setting to gain professional experience in one's specific area of study.
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.
    Open only to general family and consumer sciences majors who are juniors or seniors.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES: INTERIOR DESIGN (FCID)

101 Rapid Visualization (3)
An introduction to the techniques of freehand drawing and technical sketching to develop confidence in design visualization. Students will learn a systematic approach to drawing imaginary 3-D objects, concepts, and metaphors. 
    Open only to interior design majors and minors.

110 Design Fundamentals (3)
Basic elements of design and composition, their theories and application in interior design. Understanding the fundamentals of design through two- and three-dimensional design projects and through creative problem solving.
    Open only to interior design majors and minors.

111 Graphic Communication 1 (3)
Various graphic communication techniques used as tools of interior design. Emphasis will be on sketching, perspective drawing, paraline drafting, color rendering, and 3-D model making. 
    Prerequisite: FCID 101. 
    Open only to interior design majors and minors.

112 Design Presentation Techniques (3)
An introduction to the use of two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and four-dimensional (digital) presentation design techniques. Students will learn the integrated use of traditional and digital media tools to articulate their concept development, design process, and design decision into informative and visual documents, and professional layouts. 
    Prerequisite: FCID 101. 
    Open only to interior design majors and minors.

115 Interior Materials and Applications (3)
Study of interior materials, finishes, furniture, and architectural components. Covers floor, wall, and ceiling finishes, furniture, cabinetry, and casegoods. Selection criteria, green design, cost, quality, application, sources, and specifications will be discussed and analyzed.

120 (211) Graphic Communication 2 (3)
Visual communication techniques for interior designers. Emphasis on computer applications and basic training for Computer Aided Drafting (CAD).
    Prerequisite: FCID 111 or permission of the department chairperson.

210 Historical and Theoretical Studies 1 (3)
Chronological survey of the development of major historical periods and accompanying theoretical precedents that shape the design of the built environment from antiquity through the mid-18th century. This interactive course encourages students to articulate theories based upon historical precedents providing a catalyst for future design solutions. 
    Prerequisite: FCID 110. 
    Open only to interior design majors and minors.

220 Sustainable Interiors (3)
Focuses on the examination and application of the appropriate sustainable/green principles in interior design. Emphasis will be on Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for Contract Interiors Green Building Rating System™ (LEED-CI), a national certification program by the U.S. Green Building Council. 
    Prerequisite: FCID 115. 
    Open only to interior design majors and minors.

221 Graphic Communication 3 (3)
An introduction to computer-aided 3-D modeling using a variety of current software. In addition, other computer-aided visual communication techniques will be introduced as tools in the design/problem-solving process.
    Prerequisite: FCID 120 or permission of the department chairperson.
    Open only to interior design majors and minors.

222 Interior Design Studio 1 (3)
Introduction to design process and interior planning for small scale interior spaces with more emphasis on residential design.
    Prerequisite: FCID 110, 111, 115.
    Open only to interior design majors and minors.

224 Interior Design Studio 2 (3)
Design and space planning for small to medium scale interior spaces integrating aesthetic, social, technical, and graphic communication. Introduction to research and programming processes.
    Prerequisite: FCID 120, 222.
    Open only to interior design majors and minors.

225 Historical and Theoretical Studies 2 (3)
Chronological survey of the development of major historical periods and accompanying theoretical precedents that shape design of the built environment from mid-18th century to the present. This interactive course encourages students to articulate theories based upon historical precedents providing a catalyst for future design solutions. 
    Prerequisite: FCID 210. 
    Open only to interior design majors and minors.

228 (321) Graphic Communication 4 (3)
An advanced 3-D modeling course using current modeling and rendering software to produce high quality perspectives and animations.
    Prerequisite: FCID 120 or permission of the department chairperson.

261 Universal Design (3)
Addresses the established principles of universal design by examining the benefits for people with differing abilities. The history of universal design is addressed, which is a design method providing accessibility to all people (diverse cultures, special populations, disabled, aging, and able bodied).

300 Interior Design Professional Practice (3)
Legal, financial, management, marketing, and administrative issues facing interior designers, firm principals, and managers. Covers business plan, potential legal problems, contracts, agreements, pricing products and setting fees, marketing and promotion of design services. 
    Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of the department chairperson. 
    Open only to interior design majors.

314 Color and Light in Interior Design (3)
Exploration of the principles that govern the use of color and light in interior design. Application of these principles in residential and commercial settings.
    Prerequisite: FCID 224.

320 Furniture Design (3)
This studio emphasizes the study of furniture design as art and science. Students will be introduced to historical styles and theoretical concepts, aesthetics and ergonomics, technology and design processes of furniture and furnishings, including the examination of differing forms, cultural references, anthropometrics, materials, and traditional to hybrid fabrication processes. 
    Prerequisite: FCID 221, 224, or ARCH 201. 
    Open only to interior design majors and minors.

324 Interior Design Studio 3 (3)
Development and application of planning processes for medium scale commercial and residential projects with focus on accessibility and universal design.
    Prerequisite: FCID 221, 224.
    Open only to interior design majors and minors.

334 Interior Design Studio 4 (3)
Development and application of planning techniques of larger scale commercial projects with focus on hospitality and retail design.
    Prerequisite: FCID 324.
    Open only to interior design majors and minors.

362 Interior Construction and Detailing (3)
Covers information required for construction and detailing of interiors. Components and construction of partitions, ceilings, flooring, and custom cabinetry will be covered. 
    Prerequisite: FCID 221, 224. 
    Open only to interior design majors and minors.

369 Internship in Interior Design (1-5)
Provides the opportunity for the student to work in an established internship setting in interior design, architecture, or related design firms to gain professional experience in the field of environmental design.
    Prerequisite: FCID 324 and permission of the internship coordinator.
    A total of 5 hours of credit may be earned.
    Open only to interior design majors.

390 Interior Design Programming (3)
Methods for gathering, organizing, and assessing data needed to design the interior of any type of building. Design concepts, goals, objectives, staff and employee projections, current and future space requirements, adjacencies, furnishing, furniture and equipment requirements, project cost, and building codes will be discussed. 
    Prerequisite: FCID 324 or permission of the department chairperson.

400 NCIDQ Preparation (1)
Prepares students for the National Council for the Interior Design Qualification exam by simulating the actual testing experience. Covers all the exercises that will be encountered on the actual examination.
     Prerequisite: FCID 424 or permission of the department chairperson.
     Open only to interior design majors.

424 Interior Design Studio 5 (3)
Development and application of planning techniques, construction documentation techniques of larger scale commercial projects with focus on health care and office systems environments.
    Prerequisite: FCID 334.

484 Interior Design Studio 6 (3)
Comprehensive studio integrating research and analysis of existing or proposed structures, contextual development of interior solutions, building constraints, and specialized products and materials specifications. A self-directed studio with research completed in fall semester in the programming course.
    Prerequisite: FCID 390, 424.
    Open only to interior design majors and minors.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES: PROPERTY MANAGEMENT (FCPM)

104 Housing Decisions (3)
Overview of the importance of housing and the options available. Topics include location, house plans, ownership, renting, legal and financial aspects, architectural styles, cultural issues, and special housing needs. Designed to meet the needs of housing consumers and those seeking a housing-related career.
    Open to all students.

123 Interior Design Basics (3)
Introduction to interior graphic communication techniques and space planning for residential environments. Design considerations, selection, specifications, and calculations for materials will be discussed.
    Not open to interior design majors or minors.

235 Introduction to Residential Property Management (3)
Introduction to professional practices in residential property management. Identification and exposure to career opportunities in the field.

255 Facilities Management (3)
An introduction to professional practices in facilities management. Identification of and exposure to career opportunities in the field.

275 Marketing and Leasing Residential Properties (3)
Attracting and retaining qualified residents is the foundation of the multi-family housing industry. Through hands-on activities and investigations, the appropriate skills for successfully marketing and leasing of residential properties are provided.
    Prerequisite: FCPM 104, 235.

305 Maintenance for Property Managers (3)
Maintenance issues that individuals in management positions will encounter are explored. Topics include types and financial implications of maintenance, general and special maintenance needs, and dealing with personal and property safety. Identifies strategies for hiring and working with maintenance personnel. The course includes a lab with experiences in property maintenance.
    Prerequisite: FCPM 235 or permission of the department chairperson.

315 Senior Housing: Design, Marketing, and Management (3)
Exploration of the principles that guide the design, marketing, and management of housing for older adults. Application of these principles through projects and field experiences.
    Prerequisite: FCPM 235 and junior standing, or permission of the department chairperson.

330 Apartment Financial Management (3)
Residential property managers are responsible for the day-to-day and long-term financial condition of the housing communities they manage. This course equips students with the knowledge and skills necessary to add value to investment properties.
    Prerequisite: FCPM 369; RE 230; junior standing.

350 Residential Equipment, Energy and Technology (3)
Exploration of the selection, use, care, and disposal of major equipment for residential uses. Analysis of household energy use and techniques for conservation. Includes the study of technological advances in residential equipment. 
    Open to all students.

369 RPM Internship (3 or 6)
Provides students the opportunity to work in an established internship setting to gain professional experience in residential property management.
    Prerequisite: ACC 201 and FCPM 275 and 305 and FCFN 210; permission of the department chairperson.
    A total of 12 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 6 in any one semester or term

375 Simulation in Residential Property Management (3)
Application of residential property management skills practiced through a simulation activity.
    Prerequisite: FCPM 330; junior standing.

400 Housing and Society (3)
Explores the relationship between housing norms and public policy, mass media, fine/applied art, literature, entertainment, education, and personal relationships, from an individual and societal perspective. Emphasis on how these factors reflect and influence housing beliefs, decisions, and aspirations.                 
    Prerequisite: FCPM 104; junior or senior standing.

405 Management of Government-Assisted Housing (3)
Identification of government-assisted housing programs and the role of management in meeting the needs of owners, residents, and regulatory agencies.
    Prerequisite: FCPM 235; junior standing.

425 Residential Property Management Project (3)
Provides hands-on opportunities in using industry standards to analyze an apartment community. The resulting project provides the management company with information to remain competitive in the apartment market.
    Prerequisite: FCPM 330; senior standing or permission of the department chairperson.

435 Trends and Issues in Residential Property Management (3)
Provides the opportunity to identify, research, and disseminate information on the trends and issues affecting the residential property management industry. Students will be able to demonstrate their ability to find and use a wide variety of resources.
    Prerequisite: FCPM 369 and senior standing, or permission of the department chairperson.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES (FCS)

103 Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences (3)
Introductory course for students interested in the interdisciplinary nature of Family and Consumer Sciences. Concepts include the profession’s common body of knowledge, systems theory, sustainability of the environment, diversity, public policy, critical and creative thinking, professional ethics, and career exploration. Includes 20-24 hours mandatory service learning. 
    Open only to freshmen and sophomores or by permission of the department chairperson.

135 Financial Literacy (1)
Development of knowledge and skills to promote financial wellness through the lifespan. Includes spending plans, credit strategies, depository institutions, consumer protection, insurance investment and retirement planning. Exploration of consumer tools to enhance financial literacy.

299X Experimental/Developmental Topics (3-6)
Topics relevant to the discipline. Course titles to be announced before each semester.
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.

400 Family and Consumer Sciences Field Studies (3-6)
Provides the opportunity to visit and observe the application of knowledge in the field. Sites for field studies may be either domestic or international and come from any area of family and consumer sciences. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson.
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.

403 Family and Consumer Sciences in Practice (3)
Examines the integration of all disciplines in family and consumer sciences to strengthen individuals, families, and communities. Emphasis on public policy, research, multicultural environments, ethics, and lifelong learning in a global society. Provides the opportunity to assess career goals.
    Prerequisite: FCS 103, senior standing or permission of the department chairperson.

494 Workshop: Family and Consumer Sciences (1-3)
Activity-oriented study of one topic in family and consumer sciences.
    A total of 9 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term.

495 Independent Study in Family and Consumer Sciences (1-3)
Investigation and exploration of a topic in family and consumer sciences not offered as a class. Requires extensive reading and development of research skills. Includes work with faculty who have expertise in the area of study.
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson.
    A total of 9 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term.

496 Seminar in Family and Consumer Sciences (l-6)
Seminar topics will be identified, focusing on current issues in the family and consumer sciences profession. Using the seminar format, the course will include research, discussion, and dissemination of information gathered on a given topic.
    Prerequisite: junior or senior standing, permission of the department chairperson.
    A total of 9 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 6 in any one semester or term.

497 Immersive Learning Experience in Family and Consumer Sciences (1-3)
Students, working as a member of an interdisciplinary team, engage in a directed immersive learning experience in Family and Consumer Sciences. Melds content, skills, societal need, and student interests into an intense, real-world transformative experience that results in a tangible product.
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson.
    A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term.

Academic Systems
North Quadrangle, Room 340
Ball State University
Muncie, IN 47306

Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.