K. Turcotte, Chairperson 

Geography as a science is distinguished by the spatial approach to understanding the mechanisms of the world’s physical and human environments and the linkages between them. Human geography is specifically concerned with the spatial aspects of human activities, while physical geography examines the spatial processes explaining the Earth’s physical environment. Both human and physical geographers develop skills in cartography, geographic information systems (GIS), and remote sensing. To meet society’s needs for greater geographic understanding in the twenty-first century, the Department of Geography offers four distinct concentrations within the major.

  • Concentration 1. Human Geography. This concentration is designed for students interested in the human dimensions of geography. Whether from a social science or humanities perspective, students apply interests in urbanization, religion, language, population, economics, ethnicity, and politics in a spatial context that includes local, regional, and global scales. Students are also able to minor in Concentration 1. While some Concentration 1 students continue their studies at the graduate level, there also exist employment opportunities in government agencies as well as the private sector.
  • Concentration 2. Travel and tourism. This concentration provides students the geographical knowledge, the analytical skills, and the practical experience that are beneficial for successful careers in the travel/tourism industry. The sequence of specialized courses addresses the spatial, organizational, social, and economic aspects of sustainable tourism development, as well as the interaction between tourists and destinations. The program’s graduates are in demand in varied travel industry fields including retail travel, tour operations, meetings and conventions, transportation and hospitality companies, along with governmental, corporate, and community organizations involved in travel/tourism promotion and development.
  • Concentration 3. GIScience. This concentration is a technical specialization for students interested in solving social and environmental problems through advanced spatial information technology. Students learn how to visualize information in ways that reveal relationships, patterns, and trends by using computer software for cartography, remote sensing, and GIS. Cartography is the art and science of making maps; remote sensing provides a means to capture visual and digital information about the earth through airborne cameras and advanced electronic spaceborne sensors; a geographic information system is a set of computer tools for analyzing spatial data. Geographic information processing and mapping systems are used by many public and private organizations worldwide, and students graduating with these technical skills are in great demand.
  • Concentration 4. Meteorology Studies. This concentration is designed for students with strong interests in weather and climate. The approach is to employ the general principles of science in systematic investigations of earth-atmosphere system and subsystem dynamics and to train students in the use of technology (satellites, radar, automated weather observations, and numerical weather prediction) to analyze these systems on a number of spatial and temporal scales. Two tracks have been developed within Concentration 4 to address a variety of student career interests within the fields of meteorology and climatology. The general track is intended for students seeking positions in which knowledge of meteorology and climatology is somewhat peripheral in satisfying primary task objectives. Examples include emergency management, environmental analysis, and transportation planning. The professional track meets American Meteorological Society (AMS) qualifications for the title “meteorologist,” and Federal Civil Service requirements (GS 1340) for employment by the National Weather Service (NWS).

The department also offers minors in human geography, GIScience, meteorology and climatology, and travel and tourism.


MAJOR IN GEOGRAPHY (BA/BS), 51-57 credits

Recommended minors for all concentrations include anthropology, history, natural resources, and environmental management.

PREFIX

NO

SHORT TITLE

CREDITS

Core requirements, 15 credits

GEOG



101
150
240
250
265

Earth Sea Sky: Geographic View
Global Geography
Map Reading and Graphics
Spatial Analytical Methods
Intro Geographic Info Systems

3
3
3
3
3





15 crs
 
Complete one concentration
Concentration 1: Human Geography, 36 credits

GEOG







120
121
270
320
321
340
350
423

Economic Geog of Globalization
Geog of Cultural Environment
Geog of International Conflict
Immig and Ethnic Geog of US
Urban Geography
Cartograp Visual Spatial Data
Geog United States and Canada
Population Geography

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

6 credits from

GEOG

NREM

323
344
309

Tourism and Geography of Food (3)
Adv Geog Info Systems Analysis (3)
Human Dimensions Global Change (3)

6

6 credits from

GEOG



351
354
356
357

Latin American and Caribbean (3)
Geography of Asia (3)
Geog Russia and Its Neighbors (3)
Geography of Europe (3)

6





51 crs
 
Minors in related fields are recommended.
Concentration 2: Travel and tourism, 42 credits

GEOG





121
261
262
369
or
479
491

Geog of Cultural Environment
Tourism Systems
Tourism Regions
Professional Experience (3-6)

Practical Experience (3-6)
Tourism Development

3
3
3


3
3

12 credits from

FCFN



NUTR
GEOG

MGT

MKG
NREM

250
or
376
or
363
360
460
300
or
300
371
or
392

Lodging Management (3)

Intro Event Management (3)

Admin of Food and Nutr Systems (3)
Tours and Meetings Management (3)
Travel and Tourism Consulting (3)
Managing Behavior in Org (3)

Principles of Marketing (3)
Outdoor Recreation and Socy (3)

Environmental Interpretation (3)


12

6 credits from

GEOG





350
351
353
354
356
357
480

Geog United States and Canada (3)
Latin American and Caribbean (3)
Geography of Indiana (3)
Geography of Asia (3)
Geog Russia and Its Neighbors (3)
Geography of Europe (3)
Distant Areas Field Studies (3)

6

9 credits from

GEOG








METC

120
270
320
321
323
340
423
470
480
230
331
334

Economic Geog of Globalization (3)
Geog of International Conflict (3)
Immig and Ethnic Geog of US (3)
Urban Geography (3)
Tourism and Geography of Food (3)
Cartograp Visual Spatial Data (3)
Population Geography (3)
Political Geography (3)
Distant Areas Field Studies (3)
Elementary Meteorology (3)
Global Climatology (3)
Atmospheric Hazards (3)



9





57 crs
   
Recommended minors for concentration 2 include modern languages and classics, food management, hospitality management, natural resources, environmental management, and any business or area studies.
 
 
Concentration 3: GIScience, 36-39 credits

GEOG






340
341
342
343
344
369
or
479

Cartograp Visual Spatial Data
Cartogra Visual Spatial Data 2
Introduction to Remote Sensing
Advanced Remote Sensing
Adv Geog Info Systems Analysis
Professional Experience (3-6)

Practical Experience (3-6)

3
3
3
3
3


3-6

6 credits from

GEOG


443
444
445
448

Sem Adv Techniq Remote Sensing (3)
Adv Cartog Visual Spatial Data (3)
GIS Apps Design and Develop (3)
Geog Infomation System Design (3)

6

6 credits from

GEOG






METC

120
121
270
320
321
423
470
230
330
331
334

Economic Geog of Globalization (3)
Geog of Cultural Environment (3)
Geog of International Conflict (3)
Immig and Ethnic Geog of US (3)
Urban Geography (3)
Population Geography (3)
Political Geography (3)
Elementary Meteorology (3)
Weather Analysis (3)
Global Climatology (3)
Atmospheric Hazards (3)


6

6 credits from

GEOG




350
351
353
354
356
357

Geog United States and Canada (3)
Latin American and Caribbean (3)
Geography of Indiana (3)
Geography of Asia (3)
Geog Russia and Its Neighbors (3)
Geography of Europe (3)

6





51-54 crs
   
Recommended minors for concentration 3 include computer science, geology, mathematics, urban planning and development, biology, natural resources, and environmental management.
 
 
Concentration 4: Meteorological Studies, 36-39 credits
GEOG  344  Adv Geog Info Systems Analysis  3
  350  Geog United States and Canada  3
METC  230  Elementary Meteorology  3
  330  Weather Analysis  3
  331  Global Climatology  3
  332  Climate Chng and Modification  3
  334  Atmospheric Hazards   3 
  450  Mesoscale Meteorology  3
   
6-9 credits from

GEOG



METC

351
354
356
357
490

Latin American and Caribbean (3)
Geography of Asia (3)
Geog Russia and Its Neighbors (3)
Geography of Europe (3)
Field Obs Severe Local Storms (6)

6-9

     
6 credits from

GEOG






METC

340
341
342
343
443
445
448
410
435

Cartograp Visual Spatial Data (3)
Cartogra Visual Spatial Data 2 (3)
Introduction to Remote Sensing (3)
Advanced Remote Sensing (3)
Sem Adv Techniq Remote Sensing (3)
GIS Apps Design and Develop (3)
Geog Infomation System Design (3)
Broadcast Meteorology (3)
Satellite, Radar, & Forecastng (3)

6





51-54 crs
Additional course work in the basic sciences such as mathematics, physics, and computer science is encouraged. Recommended minors for concentration 4 include natural resources, environmental management, and telecommunications. 

MAJOR IN METEOROLOGY AND CLIMATOLOGY (BA/BS), 84-89 credits

PREFIX  NO  SHORT TITLE  CREDITS
       
GEOG  101  Earth Sea Sky: Geographic View  3
  150  Global Geography  3
  240  Map Reading and Graphics  3
  250  Spatial Analytical Methods  3
  265  Intro Geographic Info Systems  3
  344  Adv Geog Info Systems Analysis  3
  350  Geog United States and Canada (3)   
  or     
METC  490  Field Obs Severe Local Storms (6)  3 or 6
  230  Elementary Meteorology   3 
  330  Weather Analysis   3 
  331  Global Climatology   3 
  332  Climate Chng and Modification  3
  334  Atmospheric Hazards  3
  425  Physical Meteorology  3
  435  Satellite, Radar, & Forecastng  3
  447  Thermodynamic Meteorology  3
  449  Synoptic Meteorology  3
  450  Mesoscale Meteorology  3
  451  Dynamic Meteorology  3
MATH  165  Calculus 1  4
  166  Calculus 2  4
  374  Differential Equations  3
PHYC  120  General Physics 1  5
  122  General Physics 2  5
       
6-7 credits from 
GEOG  340  Cartograp Visual Spatial Data (3)   
  341  Cartogra Visual Spatial Data 2 (3)   
  342  Introduction to Remote Sensing (3)   
  343  Advanced Remote Sensing (3)   
  443  Sem Adv Techniq Remote Sensing (3)   
  445  GIS Apps Design and Develop (3)   
  448  Geog Information System Design (3)   
MATH  267  Calculus 3 (4)   
METC  410  Broadcast Meteorology (3)  6-7
       
3-4 credits from 
CHEM  111  General Chemistry 1 (4)   
CS  120  Computer Science 1 (4)   
GEOL  206  Oceans and Nations (3)   
  420  Oceanography (3)   
PHYC  450  Electricity and Magnetism 1 (3)  3-4
     
84-89 crs
Additional course work in the basic sciences such as mathematics, physics, and computer science is encouraged. Recommended minors include natural resources, environmental management, and telecommunications. 


MINOR IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY, 21 credits

PREFIX

NO

SHORT TITLE

CREDITS

GEOG






120
121
150
240
270
321
423

Economic Geog of Globalization
Geog of Cultural Environment
Global Geography
Map Reading and Graphics
Geog of International Conflict
Urban Geography
Population Geography

3
3
3
3
3
3
3



21 crs
Not open to geography majors.

MINOR IN GIScience, 21 credits

PREFIX

NO

SHORT TITLE

CREDITS

Core requirements, 9 credits

GEOG

265
340
342

Intro Geographic Info Systems
Cartograp Visual Spatial Data 
Introduction to Remote Sensing

3
3
3





9 crs
12 credits from

GEOG





341
343
344
443
444
445
448

Cartogra Visual Spatial Data 2 (3)
Advanced Remote Sensing (3)
Adv Geog Info Systems Analysis (3)
Sem Adv Techniq Remote Sensing (3)
Adv Cartog Visual Spatial Data (3)
GIS Apps Design and Develop (3)
Geog Information System Design (3)

12





21 crs
Not open to geography concentration 3 majors.

MINOR IN METEOROLOGY AND CLIMATOLOGY, 15 credits

PREFIX 

NO    

SHORT TITLE

CREDITS

GEOG
METC

101
230
330

Earth Sea Sky: Geographic View
Elementary Meteorology
Weather Analysis

3
3
3

3 credits from

METC

331
332

Global Climatology (3)
Climate Chng and Modification (3)

3

3 credits from

METC


410
435
449
450

Broadcast Meteorology (3)
Satellite and Radar Meteorol (3)
Synoptic Meteorology (3)
Mesoscale Meteorology (3)

3





15 crs
Not open to geography concentration 4 majors.

MINOR IN TRAVEL AND TOURISM, 21 credits

PREFIX 

NO

SHORT TITLE

CREDITS

GEOG




121
261
262
360
460
491

Geog of Cultural Environment
Tourism Systems
Tourism Regions
Tours and Meetings Management
Travel and Tourism Consulting
Tourism Development

3
3
3
3
3
3

3 credits from approved 200-level or above GEOG electives

3





21 crs
Not open to geography concentration 2 majors.

TEACHER EDUCATION 

TEACHING MAJOR IN SOCIAL STUDIES (BA/BS), 99 credits

(See Teaching Major in Social Studies, College of Sciences and Humanities, for total requirements for this area.)

PREFIX 

NO    

SHORT TITLE

CREDITS

Geography concentration, 15 credits

GEOG


120
121
150
265

Economic Geog of Globalization
Geog of Cultural Environment
Global Geography
Intro Geographic Info Systems

3
3
3
3

3 credits from

GEOG










321
340
342
344
350
351
353
354
356
357
423
470

Urban Geography (3)
Cartograp Visual Spatial Data (3)
Introduction to Remote Sensing (3)
Adv Geog Info Systems Analysis (3)
Geog United States and Canada (3)
Latin American and Caribbean (3)
Geography of Indiana (3)
Geography of Asia (3)
Geog Russia and Its Neighbors (3)
Geography of Europe (3)
Population Geography (3)
Political Geography (3)




3





15 crs

SCIENCE TEACHING MAJORS

(See Science, College of Sciences and Humanities, for the Teaching
Major in Earth/Space Science.)

CERTIFICATE IN GIScience, 21 credits

(See Certificates.)

GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)

101 Earth, Sea, and Sky: A Geographic View (3)
Selected aspects of the physical environment and their relationship to human occupancy of the earth.

120 Economic Geographies of Globalization (3) 
A systematic approach to economic issues emphasizing local, regional, national, and global economic developments in the geographic setting. 

121 Geography of the Cultural Environment (3) 
Utilizes qualitative methods to investigate relationships between human culture and the environment. Spatial processes that bring about cultural diversity and change are stressed as well as the role of human activity in producing cultural landscapes. The formation of cultural landscapes over time and the impacts of globalization are emphasized. 

150 Global Geography (3) 
A basic survey course emphasizing geographic facts and interdependencies between the developed and developing world. Particular emphasis is given to physical and social environmental interdependencies. 

240 Map Reading and Graphics (3) 
A non-technical approach to the study and making of maps. Introduction to the fundamentals of map design and construction as well as techniques for map analysis. A commercial graphics software is used to create general purpose maps for the visualization and analysis of geospatial information. 

250 Spatial Analytical Methods in Geography (3)
Serves as a basic introduction to the quantitative methods employed by geographers to describe, analyze and interpret geospatial datasets. Lecture topics will include basic descriptive statistics, hypothesis formulation and testing, sampling strategies, geographical association and correlation analysis, regression, and a multivariate statistics overview.         
    Prerequisite: MATH 108 or 111 or 112 or 125 or 132 or 161 or 162 or 165 or 166. 
    Open only to geography majors and minors. 

261 Tourism Systems (3) 
Surveys the history, components, and spatial structure of travel and tourism as a socioeconomic phenomenon and as an industry. Also examines its institutional organization, the motivations and flows of travelers, and global and local interactions and implications. 

262 Tourism Regions (3) 
Examines locational patterns of various forms of tourism and the main geographic characteristics of these destinations. Analyzes spatial and temporal models and flows and their economic, social, cultural, and environmental impacts through selected detailed case studies. 

265 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3) 
Fundamentals of geographic information systems (GIS). How to visualize information in ways that reveal relationships, patterns, and trends not visible in other software systems. Develop working knowledge of the full capabilities of GIS technology. 

270 Geography of International Conflict (3)
Focuses on contemporary armed conflicts, including culture-based conflicts and competition among nations for economic and mineral resources; treats territorial disputes from a cultural and geographic perspective. Case studies vary to illustrate types of contemporary conflicts.

299X Experimental/Developmental Topics (1-6) 
Topics relevant to the discipline. Course titles will be announced before each semester. 
    A total of 6 credits may be earned. 

320 Immigration and Ethnic Geographies of the United States (3)
A systematic upper division course which introduces the geographical aspects of immigration and ethnicity in the United States, particularly with regard to the post-1965 ethnic groups from Latin America and Asia. Specific attention is given to concepts of immigration theory, identity, race, transnationality, and community formation within the larger context of human geography. 

321 Urban Geography (3) 
Distribution, classification, structure, and function of urban centers. Special attention is given to the geographic conditions affecting urban development and growth. 

323 Tourism and Geography of Food (3) 
Surveys the origin, spatial diffusion, and cultural ecology of food crops and agriculture in the context of tourism and travel. Examines the globalization of regional foods as a cultural commodity and agricultural landscapes as tourist attractions. 

340 Cartography and Visualization of Spatial Data (3) 
Introduction to cartographic methods for the visualization and analysis of geographic phenomena. Principles of design are stressed with particular emphasis on methods for symbolizing point, line, and area elements, and the principles and use of color in cartography. Produce publication quality maps using industry standard software. 
    Prerequisite: GEOG 240. 

341 Cartography and Visualization of Spatial Data 2 (3) 
Advanced techniques of cartographic production with emphasis on data representation and design for thematic mapping. Statistical methods for manipulating and symbolizing ordered spatial data are stressed. Topics covered include data classification, available inventories of data bases, and methods of interpolation. Techniques studied include dot, choropleth, proportional symbol, and isarithmic mapping. 
    Prerequisite: GEOG 250, 340. 

342 Introduction to Remote Sensing (3) 
Principles of remote sensing and its applications on earth resources. Topics include the physics of remote sensing, aerial photo interpretation, photogrammetry, multispectral, hyperspectral, thermal infrared remote sensing, RADAR/LIDAR, remote sensing of vegetation, water, and soils. 

343 Advanced Remote Sensing (3) 
Digital image processing techniques utilized to analyze remotely sensed data. Topics include remote sensing data collection, image pre-processing, image enhancement, image classification, post classification analysis, and multi-temporal data analysis for change detection. 
    Prerequisite: GEOG 342. 

344 Advanced Geographic Information Systems Analysis (3) 
Examination and use of analysis techniques in geographic information systems (GIS). Introduction to basic GIS programming. Diagramming GIS logic and processing flows. Exposure to widely used GIS data models. 
    Prerequisite: GEOG 240, 265; or permission of the instructor. 

350 Geography of the United States and Canada (3) 
Comprehensive survey of geographic regions, settlement, land use, natural resources, and potentialities of the United States and Canada. 

351 Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean (3) 
Physical and cultural patterns in a diverse world region. Emphasizes population and settlement, agriculture, and environmental hazards in the context of development. 

353 Geography of Indiana (3) 
A geographic examination of the physical, cultural, and economic diversity of the state. Field experiences supplement classroom activities. 

354 Geography of Asia (3) 
The geography of South, Southwest, Southeast, and East Asia. A survey and analysis of the physical geographic patterns, bases of cultural diversity, and changing spatial aspects of political organization. 

356 Geography of Russia and Its Neighbors (3) 
Geographic analysis of the locational, environmental, economic, and cultural diversity of the successor countries to the Soviet Union. Regional examination of Russia, Baltic, and other East European countries, Transcaucasia and Central Asia. 

357 Geography of Europe (3) 
Examines the changing physiographic, climatic, economic, and political environments of Europe. While addressing the entire European cultural area, from the Atlantic Ocean in the west, to the Ural and Caucasus mountains in the east, primary emphasis is given to countries of Western, Northern, Southern, and Central Europe. 

360 Tours and Meetings Management (3) 
Introduces principles, strategies, and techniques applicable in planning and operational stages of tours, meetings, and other organized forms of travel and tourism, both leisure and business oriented. Faculty supervised practical field experience in tour planning and conducting. Lab fees. 
    Prerequisite: GEOG 261, 262. 
    Open only to geography concentration 2 majors and minors, or by permission of the instructor. 

369 Professional Experience (3-6) 
Paid full- or part-time work experiences with an organization allied to a student’s area of specialization. Assignments depend on student interests and the sponsor’s convenience. Used for paid work experience only. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson. 
    A total of 6 credits may be earned. 

423 Population Geography (3) 
A systematic and regional analysis of areal patterns of population distribution, composition, migration, and growth, as well as their causes and the effects they have on the cultural landscape. 

443 Seminar in Advanced Techniques in Remote Sensing (3) 
Advanced techniques applied to remotely sensed data using state-of-the-art software. Review of current methods of computer and manual interpretation techniques. Includes active participation in classroom presentations. 
    Prerequisite: GEOG 342, 343.

444 Advanced Cartography and Visualization of Spatial Data (3) 
Advanced course in interactive, multimedia, and animated cartography stressing the increasingly important role of digital cartography in cyberspace. Techniques are introduced for the creation of interactive products that facilitate the transformation of raw geospatial data into meaningful geographic knowledge. Projects are selected within the student’s area of interest. 
    Prerequisite: GEOG 341. 

445 Geographic Information Systems Applications Design and Development (3) 
Fundamentals of geographic information systems (GIS) programming. Develop and implement customized GIS applications. Exposure to widely used GIS software programming environments. 
    Prerequisite: GEOG 265, 344, or permission of the instructor. 

448 Geographic Information System Design (3) 
Principles of geographic information system (GIS) design. Implementation of GIS technology. Database and user-interface design. Practical experience applying advanced GIS tools to analyze spatial data. Workshop format requires student motivated projects. 
    Prerequisite: GEOG 344. 

460 Travel and Tourism Consulting (3) 
Familiarization with and assessment of various travel products and their distribution channels. Development of skills in problem solving and task functions such as: information gathering, promotion, reservation, and ticketing. Laboratory computer experience. Industry approved entry-level travel agent certification optional. 
    Prerequisite: GEOG 261, 262. 
    Open only to geography concentration 2 majors and minors, or by permission of the instructor. 

470 Political Geography (3) 
Problems and issues surrounding the geographic distribution of political actions and outcomes in the context of globalization. Topics include war and peace, access to natural resources, nationalism, democratization, terrorism, and the politics of identity. 

479 Practical Experience (3-6) 
Full- or part-time work experience with an organization allied to a student’s area of specialization. Assignments depend upon student interests and the sponsor’s convenience. Used for non-paid work experience only. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson. 
    A total of 6 credits may be earned. 

480 Distant Areas Field Studies (1-6) 
Physical, economic, and cultural geography in areas distant from the campus. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson. 
    A total of 12 credits may be earned, but no more than 6 in any one semester or term. 
    Open to students in geography, earth science, and allied subjects. 

491 Tourism Development (3) 
Discusses how to develop tourism destinations and activities that integrate sustainable economic development, accessibility, and indigenous cultural evolution with minimal impact on the environment. Includes site assessment, financial analysis, market forecasting, and impact assessment. 
    Prerequisite: GEOG 261, 262; or permission of the instructor. 

495 Readings and Special Studies in Geography and Earth Science (1-6) 
Assigned special studies in geography and earth science, including readings, research projects, teaching problems, or assignment to an undergraduate class. 
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson.
    A total of 6 credits may be earned.

METEOROLOGY AND CLIMATOLOGY (METC)

230 Elementary Meteorology (3)
Introductory presentation of basic meteorological processes with a focus on applying theory to the analysis and forecasting of local weather conditions.

330 Weather Analysis (3)
Presentation and practice of synoptic- and meso-scale diagnostic analysis techniques, including a review of satellite and radar remote sensing systems and image interpretation. Introduction to numerical weather prediction. 
    Prerequisite: METC 230.

331 Global Climatology (3)
Introduction to the dynamics of the global climate system. Emphasizes the physical processes that force spatial variability in climate, and the feedback mechanisms associate with global teleconnections and climate change.
    Prerequisite: METC 230.

332 Climate Change and Modification (3)
Study of the variability of climate over time and space, and factors involved. Focuses on past climates, modeling of future climates, and modification at local or microscale.
    Prerequisite: METC 230.

334 Atmospheric Hazards (3)
Examination of the causes, consequences, and spatial distribution of hazards deriving from or impacting the atmosphere. Both the physical properties and processes of natural hazards (e.g. hurricanes, tornadoes, biochemical) and the human actions and reactions to these hazards will be emphasized at the local, regional, and global scales.
    Prerequisite: METC 230.

410 Broadcast Meteorology (3)
Survey of weathercasting including history, current practice, and presentation techniques. Also examines methods for communicating scientific information to non-scientists. Includes a practicum where students present forecasts.
    Prerequisite: METC 330.

425 Physical Meteorology (3)
Study of the physical processes of the atmosphere with a focus on solar and terrestrial radiation, clouds, and precipitation.
    Prerequisite: METC 330 and MATH 165 and PHYC 120.

435 Satellite, Radar, and Forecasting (3)
Study of the tools used to remotely sense and analyze the atmosphere, including meteorological satellites, Doppler radar, and forecast computer models. Emphasis is on the applications of satellite, radar, and computer model products to short and medium range weather forecasting. Includes an overview of forecast techniques and a forecasting practicum.
    Prerequisite: METC 330.

447 Thermodynamic Meteorology (3)
Application of physical gas laws such as the equation of state and hydrostatic equation to investigate adiabatic processes and parcel theory as they relate to atmospheric instability and connective development.
    Prerequisite: METC 330 and MATH 165 and 166 and PHYC 120 and 122.

449 Synoptic Meteorology (3)
Investigation of synoptic- and mesobeta-scale atmospheric systems, with a focus on mathematical and physical theories of weather forecasting and application of those theories through the use of satellite, radar, and numerical weather prediction technology.
    Prerequisite: METC 330 and MATH 165 and PHYC 120.

450 Mesoscale Meteorology (3)
Survey of mesoscale-related phenomena of the atmosphere, including thunderstorms, tornadoes, and lake-effect snow. Includes information about forecasting the occurrence and evolution of such phenomena with tools like Skew-T diagrams and Doppler radar.
    Prerequisite: METC 330.

451 Dynamic Meteorology (3)
Study of the variables that explain four-dimensional atmospheric behavior with primary focus on synoptic-scale processes. Special attention is given to the governing equations and associated approximation and assumption relevant to numerical weather prediction.
    Prerequisite: METC 330 and MATH 165 and 166 and PHYC 120 and 122.

490 Field Observation of Severe Local Storms (6)
Multi-week field trip to the Great Plains region to forecast, observe, and document thunderstorms and related phenomena such as lightning, hail, and tornadoes. Trip is preceded by a series of lectures on storm behavior, extreme weather forecasting, and safe chasing techniques.
    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.