S. Hall, Chairperson

We are a diverse group of faculty who are dedicated to preparing competent and committed educators, leaders, and human services providers in a variety of settings. The department was created in 2017 by combining programs from the Department of Family and Consumer Science and Department of Technology into the Teachers College. The realignment will help students flourish by providing them the resources and support to more efficiently pursue academic excellence.

Students can select one of several programs or concentrations:

  • The Family and Child Major. This concentration comprises of three areas, each of which facilitates careers working with families and children. The program incorporates the Child Study Center, which is accredited by the National Academy of Early Childhood Programs. Students may choose one or more of these concentrations in which to specialize within the program:
     Family and Child: Child Development. Child Development prepares students for careers working with young children and their families. Students attain the skills to teach or direct child development programs, work as developmental therapists, home visitors, or in other areas of the early care and education field. They have many experiential opportunities to interact with young children at the nationally accredited Child Study Center. 
    Family and Child: Child Life. Child List assists students in preparing to pursue a Master's degree in child life. Beginning in 2022, new child life specialists will be required to have completed a Master's degree (currently not offered at BSU). Child life specialists work in health care settings, primarily hospitals, and assist pediatric patients and their families. Students learn to apply child development and family practices to meet the needs of their target audience.  Course work aligns with the curricular emphases of the Child Life Council, the certifying organization for the profession.
    Family and Child: Family Studies. Family Studies prepares students for careers in working with individuals and families across the life cycle. This concentration provides the opportunity for graduates to become Certified Family Life Educators (CFLE), a national certification regulated by National Council on Family Relations. Family Life Education incorporates a preventive and educational approach to individual and family issues such as communication and relationship skills, parenting education, marriage education, and diversity and other social issues related to the family. Family Studies also provides ideal preparation for students interested in pursuing advanced degrees in marriage and family counseling.
  • Family and Consumer Sciences Education. This program prepares individuals to teach family and consumer sciences classes in public or private schools. The focus of these classes in schools today is on family roles, child development, life skills, consumer rights and responsibilities, and community contributions. Graduates who complete this major also qualify to become extension educators or work for other public and private agencies. This program is approved by CAEP (Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation).
  • Teaching Major in Technology and Engineering Education. The Teaching Major in Technology and Engineering Education curriculum prepares students to teach pre-engineering and technology courses at the secondary level (grades 6-12).


MAJOR IN FAMILY AND CHILD (BA/BS), 64-69 credits

PREFIX
NO  SHORT TITLE
CREDITS
       
Complete the following, 43 credits   
EDPS  351 Adolescent Psychology   3
FCFC  100  Intro Family Child  1
  202  Child and Family Wellness  3
  250  Family Relations  3
  265  Infant and Toddler Dvlp Educ   3 
  275  Child Development  3
  380  Parenting  3
  393  Present Practice Tech Fam Educ  3
  425  Grant Writing Research Methods  3
  484  Family Stressors and Crises  3
  485  Family Policy  3
FCS  103  FCS Body of Knowledge  3
  403  FCS in Practice   3 
NUTR  240  Nutrition for Educators (3)  3
  or     
  275  Personal Nutrition (3)  3
PSYS  100  Intro to Psychological Science   3 
       
Choose one area to complete the concentration:   
Family and Child: Child development concentration, 21 credits 
EDEL  260  EC Curriculum and Instruction  3
  442  Administration of EC Programs  3
FCCD  400  Internship Child Dev (3-6)  3
FCFC  310  Promot Prosocial Behav Child  3
  320  Leadership Mgt Child Dev Prog  3
  465  Adv Child Dev in Practice 3
SPCE  210  Thry and Pract in EC Spec Ed   3 
        
Family and Child: Child life concentration, 26 credits  
BIO  100  Biology for a Modern Society  3
  254  Biology in the Social Context  3
FCCL  400  Internship in Child Life (3-6)  3
FCFC  310  Promot Prosocial Behav Child  3
  465  Adv Child Dev in Practice  3
  492  Prof Practice Child Life  3
HSC  371  Death and Dying  3
NUR  101  Termin Hlth Care Prof and Cons  3
  103  Health Behav: Cult Variations  3
       
Family and Child: Family studies concentration, 24 credits 
EDPS  355  Adult Psychology (3)   
  or     
SOC  431  Aging and the Life Course (3)  3
FCFC  340  Life Workplace Management  3
  394  Family Services Administration (3)   
  or     
  320  Leadership Mgt Child Dev Prog (3)   
  or     
  492  Prof Practice Child Life (3)  3
  475  Marriage  3
FCFS  400  Internship in Family Studies (3-6)  3
HSC  261  Health, Sex, and Family Life (3)   
  or     
PSYS  377  Psychology of Sexual Behavior (3)  3
SOCW  100  Introduction to Social Work  3
  325  Human Behav and Social Envr 2  3
     
64-69 crs

MINOR IN DESIGN TECHNOLOGY, 18 credits

PREFIX  NO  SHORT TITLE  CREDITS
       
TCST  106  CAD for Construction Management  3
TDPT  280  3D Prototyping  3
TGRA  286  Digital Photography 1  3
  387  Digital Photography 2  3
TMFG  105  Technical Design Graphics  3
3 credits from approved elective   3
     
18 crs

MINOR IN FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES, 21 credits

PREFIX
NO  SHORT TITLE  CREDITS
       
FCFN  110  Prin Food Prep and Food Serv  3
FCS  103  FCS Body of Knowledge  3
   
6 credits from   
FCFA  101  Dimensions of Clothing (3)   
  270  The Fashion Industry (3)   
FCPM  104  Housing Decisions (3)  6
   
3 credits from   
NUTR  240  Nutrition for Educators (3)   
  275  Personal Nutrition (3)   
  340  Prin of Human Nutrition (3)  3
   
6 credits from   
FCFC  202  Child and Family Wellness (3)   
  250  Family Relations (3)   
  265  Infant and Toddler Dvlp Educ (3)   
  275  Child Development (3)   
  340  Life Workplace Management (3)   
  450  Consumer Education (3)   
  475  Marriage (3)  6
     
21 crs

MINOR IN INDUSTRIAL LEADERSHIP, 18 credits

PREFIX  NO  SHORT TITLE  CREDITS
       
MGT  300  Managing Behavior in Org  3
  361  FDN of HR Employee Relations  3
TDPT  360  Industrial Safety and Health  3
  390  Training and Devel in Industry  3
TMFG  161  Intro Manufacturing Industries  3
Approved technical elective  3
     
18 crs

TEACHER EDUCATION

Teaching programs require additional courses in educational methods. The professional education courses are included in this listing. See the Department of Educational Studies and Teachers College for the descriptions of these courses and other professional requirements of the teacher education program. 

TEACHING MAJOR IN FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES (BA/BS), 87 credits

PREFIX
NO  SHORT TITLE  CREDITS
       
FCED  150  Basic Concept Second Ed in FCS  3
  492  Implementation FCED Programs  3
  493  Cooperative Programs in FCED  3
FCFA  101  Dimensions of Clothing  3
  102  Fund of Apparel Construction  3
  230  Textiles for Apparel  3
FCFC  202  Child and Family Wellness  3
  250  Family Relations  3
  275  Child Development  3
  340  Life Workplace Management  3
FCFN  110  Prin Food Prep and Food Serv  3
  220  Meal Design and Presentation  3
FCPM  104  Housing Decisions  3
  123  Interior Design Basics  3
  350  Residential Equip, Energy Tech  3
FCS  103  FCS Body of Knowledge 3
  403  FCS in Practice  3
NUTR  375  Personal Nutrition (3)   
  or     
  340  Prin of Human Nutrition (3)  3
     
54 crs

CHEM 100 as a prerequisite for FCFA 230 and FCFN 340 is waived. 

SENIOR HIGH, JUNIOR HIGH/MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATION PROGRAM

PREFIX
NO  SHORT TITLE  CREDITS
       
Professional education sequence, 33 credits  3
EDFO  420  Soc, Hist, Phil Found of Ed  3
EDJH  385  Prin of Tchng in Mid Schl  3
EDMU  205  Intro to Multicul Ed  3
EDPS  251  Development Secondary  3
  390  Educational Psychology  3
EDRD  320  Disciplinary Literacy Elem Sch  3
EDSE  380  Princ of Tchng in Sec School  3
Student teaching  12 
     
33 crs
     
87 crs

See Professional Education Assessment/Decision Points for additional information. 

TEACHING MAJOR IN TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING EDUCATION (BA/BS), 81 credits

The Teaching Major in Technology and Engineering Education curriculum prepares students to teach pre-engineering and technology courses at the secondary level (grades 6-12). 
       
PREFIX
NO  SHORT TITLE
CREDITS
       
MATH 111  Pre-Calculus Algebra  3
PHYC  100  Conceptual Physics  3
TCST  250  Construction Methods Matls 1  3
TDPT  100  Technology and Society  3
  204  Energy Processing  3
  406  Technical Decision Making  3
TEDU  102  Design Techniques  3
  305  Technological Systems  3
  403  Technological Enterprise  3
       
3 credits related to engineering competency   
TCST  106  CAD for Const Management (3)   
TDPT  210  Engineering Principles (3)   
TMFG  105  Technical Design Graphics (3)  3
       
3 credits related to information processing   
CS  110  Intro Comp Sci and Web Prog (3)   
TCMP  111  Computer Assembly Trblshooting (3)   
TGRA  180  Introduction to Graphic Comm (3)  3
       
3 credits related to materials/resources  
TDPT  203  Material Processing (3)   
  280  3D Prototyping (3)   
  303  Manufacturing Systems (3)   
TEDU  108  Production Techniques (3)   
TMFG  262  Manufacturing Materials (3)  3
     
Directed elective  3
     
39 crs

CHEM 111 is prerequisite to TMFG 262. Students should take PHYC 100 for the University Core Curriculum and to satisfy the prerequisite for TDPT 210. Either CHEM 111 or PHYC 100 may satisfy the University Core Curriculum Tier 1 Domain-Natural Sciences.

SENIOR HIGH, JUNIOR HIGH/MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATION PROGRAM

PREFIX  NO  SHORT TITLE  CREDITS
       
Professional education sequence, 42 credits   
EDFO  420  Soc, Hist, Phil Found of Ed  3
EDJH  385  Prin of Tchng in Mid Schl  3
EDMU  205  Intro to Multicul Ed  3
EDPS  251  Development Secondary  3
  390  Educational Psychology  3
EDRD  320  Disciplinary Literacy Elem Sch  3
EDSE  380  Princ of Tchng in Sec School  3
  460  Student Tchng: Sec Schl (6-7)  7
  465  Elective Student Teaching (3 or 5)  5
TEDU  195  Exploring Technology Education  3
  395  Teaching Technology  3
  396  Prgrm Plnnng Implemt  3
     
42 crs
     
81 crs

See Professional Education Assessment/Decision Pointsfor additional information. Students must complete TEDU 195, 395, and 396 prior to student teaching.

CERTIFICATE IN INFANT/TODDLER SPECIALIZATION,
18 credits 

(See Certificates.)

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES: CHILD DEVELOPMENT (FCCD)

400 Internship in Child Development (3-6)
Provides the opportunity for the student to work in an internship setting to gain professional experience in child development.
    
Prerequisite: FCFC 315 or 465 and permission of the department chairperson.
    A total of 6 credits may be earned.
    Open only to child development students.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES: CHILD LIFE (FCCL)

400 Internship in Child Life (3-6)
Provides internship experience for child life specialist students under the supervision of a child life specialist.
    
Prerequisite: FCFC 465 and permission of the department chairperson.
    A total of 6 credits may be earned.
    Open only to child life students.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES: EDUCATION (FCED)

150 Basic Concepts of Secondary Education in Family and Consumer Sciences (3)
Designed to help students make valid decisions about preparing for and functioning in family and consumer science teaching careers. Professionalism, job requirements, employment opportunities, secondary school curricula, and the role of secondary education within the entire educational process are discussed.

392 Principles and Philosophy of Vocational Education (3)
Applies the principles and philosophies of vocational education to program organization, content area, teacher qualifications, leadership preparation, curriculum design, and image.

395 Methods and Materials for Teaching Family and Consumer Sciences (5)
Organization of teaching units and lesson plans; selection and use of teaching methods and materials.
    
Prerequisite: identification to pursue a teaching curriculum.
    Prerequisite recommended: EDSE 380.

490 Practicum in Family and Consumer Sciences Education (1-3)
Individual or group studies and experiences. Experience with professional standards, regulations, and supervision in the work related to family and consumer sciences chosen by the student.
    
Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson.
    A total of 9 credits may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term.

492 Implementation of Family and Consumer Sciences Education Programs (3)
Emphasizes techniques for implementing vocational education programs, including applications to management, public relations, and professionalism in vocational family and consumer sciences.
    
Open only to family and consumer science education majors.

493 Coordination of Cooperative Programs in Vocational Education (3)
Coordination of class instruction and work experience. Includes recruiting, selecting, and evaluating students; selecting training stations; working with an advisory committee; role of coordinator; techniques and legal concerns of coordination; and placement and follow-up of graduates.
    
Open only to family and consumer science education majors.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES: FAMILY AND CHILD (FCFC)

100 Introduction to Family and Child (1)
An overview and analysis of the family and child field, including discussion of academic requirements, career opportunities, and ethical standards in each of the three areas: Child Development, Child Life, and Family Studies.

202 Child and Family Wellness (3)
Explore the concepts of wellness, emphasizing nutrition, health and safety as it applies to children and families. Increase awareness of the need for healthy environments and use of sustainable and age appropriate practices in environments with families and children.

250 Family Relations (3)
Focuses on family dynamics and interaction across a variety of family structures and backgrounds. Explores the impact of larger social systems on the family, changing concepts of family, and family processes throughout the life cycle. Emphasizes healthy interaction patterns and skills to strengthen family relationships.

265 Infant/Toddler Development and Education (3)
Growth and development from conception through the third year of life emphasizing how children learn. Includes physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development. Students interact with and observe infants and toddlers in laboratory setting. Students implement developmental exercises and activities.

275 Child Development (3)
Students will study physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development of young children ages 3-8. Students will also participate in, observe, and complete assignments in a preschool laboratory setting utilizing developmentally appropriate practices.

310 Promoting Prosocial Behavior in Young Children: Guidance and Cultural Factors (3)
Students will study the research-based theories and practices of developmentally appropriate guidance as applied to early care and education settings. Students will examine the relationships among family, community, and care, and will develop an understanding of anti-bias and multiculturalism as applied to child development.

320 Leadership and Management in Child Development Programs (3)
Examine leadership and administrative issues that students will face in early care and education settings, including center-based programs, Head Start, and family childcare options.
    
Prerequisite: FCFC 265 or 275 or 315.

340 Life and Workplace Management (3)
Application of management principles to achieve life and workplace goals and responsibilities. Emphasis on use of resources, technology, effective communication, and management to diminish stress.

380 Parenting (3)
Research-based parenting practices supporting the positive development of children in diverse families throughout the life cycle.
    
Prerequisite: FCFC 250 or 315.

393 Presentations, Practices and Techniques for Family Life Education (3)
Development of techniques for presentations and projects meeting the needs of diverse audiences in family and consumer sciences. Includes participation in use of methods, development, evaluation, and techniques for varied environments.
    
Not open to teaching majors in family and consumer sciences.

394 Family Services Administration (3)
Introduces students to the primary skills, functions, and responsibilities associated with working in and leading nonprofit social service organizations. Structured to prepare students for professional careers working in agencies that provide services for families.

425 Grant Writing and Research Methods (3)
Focusing on the family and child disciplines, students will learn the research process, from developing research questions to analyzing data and interpreting results. Students will explore the grant writing process and methods for finding funding sources.
    
Prerequisite: FCFC 250.

465 Advanced Child Development in Practice (3)
Faculty-guided professional experience working with young children in a developmentally appropriate early care environment. Students complete 200 hours, including attending weekly staff and monthly training meetings at the Child Study Center.
    
Prerequisite: FCFC 265 or 275.

475 Marriage (3)
Relationship dynamics and contemporary changes to the institution of marriage. Emphasizes the individual within marriage, dating, mate selection, relationship maintenance, communication, sexual adjustment, marriage dissolution, and marital growth.
    
Open only to juniors and seniors or by permission of the department chairperson.

484 Family Stressors and Crises (3)
Focuses on stressors individuals and families experience across the life cycle and methods of coping. Teaches skills in professional ethics and boundaries when working with or educating families.
    
Prerequisite: FCFC 250; junior or senior standing or permission of the department chairperson.

485 Family Policy (3)
Explores policy at the local, state, and federal levels and its impact on family life. Students will assess the effectiveness of policies and programs from a family perspective, learn about the policymaking process, and critically examine different roles professionals can play in influencing policy development.
    
Prerequisite or parallel: FCFC 250 or permission of the department chairperson.

492 Professional Practices in Child Life (3)
Students will learn clinical and professional practices required to work in the child life field, including the history of the child life profession, ethics in child life, interventions, and healing environments in family-centered care.

496 Seminar in Family Relations (1-3)
History and recent trends and developments in family-life education, career opportunities involved in family-life education, professional organizations, and ethical standards.
    
Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson and junior or senior standing.
    A total of 3 credits may be earned.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES: FAMILY STUDIES (FCFS)

400 Internship in Family Studies (3-6)
Provides the opportunity for the student to work in an established internship setting to gain professional experience in working with families.
    
Prerequisite: FCFC 250 and 393 and permission of the department chairperson.
    A total of 6 credits may be earned.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES: GENERAL (FCGI)

369 FCS General Internship (3-6)
Provides the opportunity for the student to work in an established internship setting to gain professional experience in one's specific area of study.
    A total of 6 credits may be earned.
   Open only to general family and consumer sciences majors who are juniors or seniors.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES (FCS)

103 Family and Consumer Sciences Body of Knowledge (3)
Introductory course concerning the interdisciplinary nature of family and consumer sciences. Concepts include the profession's common body of knowledge, systems theory, sustainability of the environment, diversity, public policy, critical and creative thinking, professional ethics, and career exploration. Includes 24 hours of mandatory service learning.
    
Open only to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors or by permission of the department chairperson.

403 Family and Consumer Sciences in Practice (3)
Examines the integration of all disciplines in family and consumer sciences to strengthen individuals, families, and communities. Emphasis is on research, public policy, multicultural environments, ethics, and lifelong learning in a global society. Career goals are assessed. Includes immersive learning component. Involves writing.
   
Prerequisite: FCS 103, senior standing, or by permission of the department chairperson.

TECHNOLOGY: DEPARTMENT (TDPT)

100 Technology and Society (3)
The history, development, production, use, and assessment of technology and an examination of its effects upon resources, individuals, society, and the environment.

101 Fundamentals of Safety and Health Technology (3)
Study of accident-prevention and loss-control methods, procedures, and programs and their impact on people and workplaces; and the ethical application of codes and standards, applicable safety and health-related practices, and safety engineering and management principles.

102 Introduction to Computer-Aided Design (3)
Designed to provide students with an introduction to the use of computer-aided software utilizing the use of 2-D applications.

110 Instructional Technology in the Elementary School (2)
Develops basic skills in the use of instructional technology to support teaching and learning in the elementary school. Includes lab activities outside of class.

125 Survey of Plastics (3)
Surveys the plastics industry and introduces the uniqueness of plastics relative to traditional materials. Topics include plastics organizations, environmental issues, career and job opportunities, identification of plastics, manufacture of plastics, application of plastics, etc.

154 Graphic Communication for Interior Design (3)
Introduction to the fundamentals of graphic communication techniques used in design fields. Explores sketching, mechanical, and computer techniques to produce graphics for a variety of presentation methods.

160 Technical Analysis (3)
The computational and presentation skills needed to solve technical problems.

201 Safety and Health Regulations and Compliance (3)
Mandatory safety and health regulations and compliance standards and procedures are investigated based upon Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), insurance institute, and workplace standards/practices.

203 Material Processing (3)
Industrial materials and processes are studied, including material identification, classification, properties, procurement, processing, use, and disposal. Includes laboratory activities.

204 Energy Processing (3)
Examines sources and types of energy and common energy processing techniques. Emphasizes controlling and transmitting energy and the operation of energy conversion systems. Includes laboratory activities.

210 Engineering Principles (3)
Examines core concepts and principles of engineering, including constraints, optimization, and predictive analysis. Laboratory experiences emphasize the development of skills required to apply engineering processes.
    
Prerequisite: MATH 111; PHYC 100.

213 Interior Construction Materials, Processes, and Products (3)
Designed specifically for non-majors. Content is organized around specific construction units related to materials, processes, and products of residential and commercial construction.

280 3-D Prototyping (3)
Introduction for students from many disciplines to use the 3-D graphics software, reverse engineering, rapid prototyping, laser machining, and CNC machining to iteratively manipulate original 3-D product designs and make prototypes.

299X Experimental/Developmental Topics (3 or 6)
Topics relevant to the discipline. Course titles will be announced before each semester.
    
A total of 6 credits may be earned.

301 Developing and Managing Safety and Health Programs (3)
An analysis of the concepts, relationships, and principles of managing an organization's occupational safety and health technology duties and functions; and the development of safety objectives and policies, training procedures and practices for integration into an organization, and evaluation and management of risk and program implementation and evaluation.
    
Prerequisite: TDPT 101 or permission of the instructor.

303 Manufacturing Systems (3)
Manufacturing systems, tools, and processes are studied as they are applied to producing products. Laboratory experiences cover 
manufacturing systems emphasizing tooling design, automated manufacturing, and control systems. Includes laboratory activities.
    Prerequisite: TMFG 105 or TCST 106; TEDU 108 or permission of the department chairperson.

360 Industrial Safety and Health (3)
Study of the practices used to establish a safe and healthful environment for industrial personnel. Includes the requirements of safety- and health-regulating agencies, and hazard recognition and correction.

364 Technology Education for the Elementary Grades (2)
A laboratory in technology education emphasizing the use of tools, materials, and processes that provide enrichment of the elementary program. Methods of planning and developing individual and group activity units are examined and evaluated.

369 Cooperative Education in Technology (1-3)
A planned continuous placement in a technology-related position that integrates and applies course content to the workplace. A paid work and learning experience for computer technology and graphic arts management majors.
    
Prerequisite: permission of the work experience coordinator.
    A total of 3 credits may be earned.

380 Internship in Technology (3)
Emphasizes internal or external placement in a technology workplace. Provides opportunities to integrate and apply course content to the workplace. A paid or unpaid work experience for majors in the Department of Technology.
    
Prerequisite: permission of the work experience coordinator.
    A total of 6 credits may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term.

390 Training and Development in Industry (3)
Training and development in industry and their relationship to the job and organization. Emphasizes skills needed to systematically plan, implement, evaluate, and revise training and development programs. Provides opportunities for practical application and practice.

400 Capstone in Technology (3)
Use of hands-on laboratory experiences to apply, integrate, and assess technological concepts, systems, processes, and products. Includes laboratory activities.
    
Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson; junior standing.

406 Technological Decision Making (3)
Focuses on technology assessment techniques used to differentiate the potential impacts of alternative technological decisions. Policy development in the public and private sectors, and at the personal level, is examined.
    
Prerequisite: junior status.

450 Industrial Research and Development (3)
Focuses on the methodology and practices of technical research and development as conducted in an industrial setting. In laboratory activities students perform basic tasks associated with product and process research and development.
    
Prerequisite: TEDU 403 or TMFG 161.

TECHNOLOGY: EDUCATION (TEDU)

102 Design Techniques (3)
Introduces tools and techniques for developing and communicating technological designs. Experiences include sketching, rendering, mechanical and computer-aided drawing, modeling, and presentation skills. Includes laboratory activities.

108 Production Techniques (3)
Studies the tools, machines, and processes used in the technology education classroom and laboratory. Laboratory experiences help develop techniques related to material and information processing. Includes laboratory activities.

195 Exploring Technology Education (3)
The profession of teaching technology in the public schools is introduced and discussed. Study of the role of education, good teacher qualities, and the development of technology education programs. State and national curriculum trends are analyzed.

202 Product Design (3)
A variety of design models and techniques are explored. Focuses on elements and principles of design, design processes and characteristics, developing and evaluating potential solutions, modeling, and presenting solutions. Includes laboratory activities.
    
Prerequisite: TEDU 102, 108.

290 Career and Technical Student Organizations (3)
Emphasizes the implementation, maintenance, and evaluation of career and technical student organizations.

292 Principles and Philosophy of Career and Technical Education (3)
Introduction to the foundation and operation of various career and technical educational programs. Analyzes legislation in the light of past and present issues of career and technical education and its function as a vital component of the educational system.

304 Transportation Systems (3)
Studies transportation technology as it is applied to vehicular and support systems for moving people and cargo in various environments. The effects of transportation technology on individuals, society, and the environment are introduced and explored. Includes laboratory activities.
    
Prerequisite: TEDU 102, 108 or permission of the department chairperson.

305 Technological Systems (3)
The study of technological systems involving communication, production, transportation, and bio-technologies. Classroom and laboratory experiences examine the nature of modern systems.

390 Trade and Occupational Analysis (3)
A study of the fundamentals of analyzing trades and occupations. Techniques of identifying occupations by breakdown into jobs, tasks, and processes.

392 Career and Technical Related Class Content (3)
A study of the sources of related materials and techniques of developing and using these materials.

393 Career and Technical Guidance (3)
Principles, purposes, and practices of guidance by the teacher. Examines and evaluates educational and occupational information, testing programs, school records, occupational trends, and job-training programs.

395 Teaching Technology (3)
Studies the development and implementation of strategies for teaching technology education. Emphasizes planning daily instruction, preparing support materials, classroom management, assessing and evaluating learning, and a variety of teaching strategies and skills in technology education. Includes a public school teaching experience.
    
Prerequisite: TEDU 195.

396 Program Planning and Implementation (3)
Design and evaluate technology-based instruction and curriculum for meeting student needs. Facility planning, program planning, and trends in technology education are explored. Includes a public school teaching experience.
    
Prerequisite: TEDU 395.

403 Technological Enterprise (3)
Presents the relationship between technology and the corporate sector. Emphasizes organization, management, operation, and impact of technological enterprises. Laboratory experiences include organizing, staffing, and operating a student-managed enterprise. Includes laboratory activities.
    
Prerequisite: TEDU 102 or TMFG 105 or TCST 106, TEDU 108.

410 Capstone Experience in Technology (3)
A technological product, process, or system is studied. Conduct in-depth research on an approved topic related to technology. Results of the research are formally presented to peers and faculty.
    
Prerequisite: junior standing.

490 Study in Technology (1-3)
Personal or group study of a technology that is not emphasized in other courses.
    
A total of 3 credits may be earned.

492 Organization and Coordination of Career and Technical Education (3)
The organizational structure, responsibilities, and roles recognized in the operation of career and technical education programs. Major emphasis on state functions.

TECHNOLOGY: MANUFACTURING (TMFG)

104 Introduction to Six Sigma (3)
Introduces the tenets of Six Sigma and Lean Performance. Uses descriptive statistics (graphical techniques) to develop analytical and problem-solving skills.

105 Technical Design Graphics (3)
Introduction to mechanical design and production drawing. Topics include: sketching, lettering, solid modeling, multiview drawings, isometric drawings, auxiliary and section views, dimensioning and tolerancing, and the creation of working drawings. Unigraphics solid modeling software is the primary design tool used in the laboratory. A weekly laboratory is scheduled.

161 Introduction to Manufacturing Industries (3)
Introduction to manufacturing and its managed activities: research and development, production, marketing, industrial relations, and finance. Laboratory experiences involve organizing, staffing, and operating a model manufacturing enterprise.

205 Computer-Aided Design (3)
Emphasizes modeling and dimensioning. Additional topics include: feature identification and parametric design, dimensioning and modeling with consideration to part relationships, fundamentals of geometric, dimensioning and tolerancing, advanced work with assembly drawings, design of functional gages, and rapid prototyping. A weekly laboratory is scheduled.
     
Prerequisite: TMFG 105 or equivalent.
    Parallel: appropriate 100-level mathematics course.

225 Industrial Plastics (3)
Study of industrial plastics processes, materials, and product design. Includes polymer chemistry, processing nomenclature, injection molding, extrusion, extrusion blow molding, compression and transfer molding, thermoforming, and other topics. Weekly laboratory scheduled.
    
Prerequisite: CHEM 111.

233 Machine Tools (3)
Theory and application of production and automated machine tools. Laboratory includes tool design, cutting theory, basic machines, feeds, speeds, precision measurement, NC programming, and safety. Weekly laboratory scheduled.
    
Prerequisite: MATH 112 or equivalent.

262 Manufacturing Materials (3)
Fundamentals of material science with an emphasis on how material properties influence their application in products and processing. Metallic, polymeric, and ceramic materials will be discussed. Laboratory activities using standardized testing procedures will provide a practical understanding of material characteristics. Weekly laboratory scheduled.
    
Prerequisite: CHEM 111 or permission of the department chairperson.

265 Applied Quality Control (3)
Emphasis on application of statistics to quality control. Includes hypothesis testing, statistical process control, measurement system analysis, and review of current quality standards.
    
Prerequisite: MATH 181 or ECON 221, or by permission of the instructor.

301 Automation and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Systems (3)
Comprehensive technical introduction to automation in manufacturing. Includes flow line production, material handling, group technology, and flexible and computer-integrated manufacturing. Weekly laboratory scheduled.
    
Prerequisite: TMFG 161, MATH 112 or 132 or permission of the department chairperson.

305 Manufacturing Design with CAD (3)
Design of tools and fixtures for manufacturing. Includes general purpose workholders, modular and dedicated fixtures, jigs, fixturing principles, degrees of freedom, locating and clamping components, wireframe and solid modeling, and 3-D to 2-D conversion. Students design solid models of fixtures. Weekly laboratory scheduled.
    
Prerequisite: TMFG 205, 233, 335.

307 Applied Statics (3)
Force systems, resultants and equilibrium, trusses, frames, beams, and shear and moments of beams are studied.
    
Prerequisite: MATH 161.

325 Plastics Product Design (3)
Includes plastic materials testing, ASTM standards, mold design and process considerations, material rheology, failure analysis, mold bases, molding problems and solutions, snap fit design, competitive processes, and other selected topics. Weekly laboratory scheduled.
    
Prerequisite: TMFG 225.

326 Plastic Production Systems (3)
Plastics processing with automated production equipment. Emphasizes injection molding, extrusion, and thermoforming. Appropriate applications of process capability, Ishikawa diagrams, control charts, and other process variation identification tools for both process and product analysis. Weekly laboratory scheduled.
    
Prerequisite: TMFG 325.

327 Advanced Plastics Product Design (3)
Emphasizes rheology, additives and their impact on processing and final part characteristics, part design, mold flow, cavity fabrication, cavity material selection, part failure, cooling calculations, and rapid prototyping. Weekly laboratory scheduled.
    
Prerequisite: TMFG 265, 325.

331 Automated Machines (3)
Theory and application of automated machines in the manufacturing environment. Laboratory focuses on the programming and operation of NC machine tools. Weekly laboratory scheduled.
    
Prerequisite: MATH 112; TMFG 205, 233.

333 Manufacturing Machine Tool Processing (3)
Focuses on conditions that influence the control of metal manufacturing processes. Laboratory activities emphasize the significance of locators, power requirements, feeds, speeds, micro-structure, coolants, and other variables. Complex operations are covered on grinding, milling, EDM, and other multifunctional machine tools.
    
Prerequisite: TMFG 233.

334 Welding and Foundry (3)
Flat-position welding with electric and oxyacetylene equipment. Limited work with gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) equipment. Emphasizes various casting methods, pattern design, sands, gating, cores, furnaces, pouring techniques, and automated foundry practices. Weekly laboratory scheduled.
    
Prerequisite: TMFG 262.

335 Applied Mechanics (3)
Combined statics and strength of materials with applications in manufacturing. Includes design of bolted connections, simple structures, centroids, moments of inertia, and beam design. Weekly laboratory scheduled.
    
Prerequisite: MATH 161; PHYC 110; TMFG 262.

340 Fluid Power: Hydraulic Systems (3)
Fundamentals of hydraulic systems emphasizing applications of Bernoulli’s equation. Includes component types and designs, hydraulic circuit analysis, and design of hydraulic systems. Weekly laboratory scheduled.
    
Prerequisite: TMFG 307 or permission of the department chairperson.

363 Manufacturing Operations (3)
Focuses on analyzing product designs and the design, engineering, and operation of industrial production systems through classroom and laboratory activities.
    
Prerequisite: TEDU 403 or TMFG 105 and 161.

370 AC Circuit Analysis (3)
Studies the usage and interaction of discrete electronic components, integrated circuits, and microcontrollers. Weekly laboratory scheduled work includes use of capacitors, diodes, transistors, analog/digital converters, and operational amplifiers.
    
Prerequisite: TCMP 371.

375 Project Planning and Control (3)
Focuses on project planning and control. Students will participate in a simulated lean Six Sigma project. Students will take comprehensive lean Six Sigma black belt certification exams. Students who pass all the exams will receive lean Six Sigma black belt certificate of proficiency.
    
Prerequisite: TMFG 425; ISOM 375.

407 Applied Strength of Materials (3)
The principles of strength, stiffness, and stability are introduced and applied primarily to mechanical components.
    
Prerequisite: MATH 162; TMFG 307 or 335.

425 Design of Experiments (3)
Includes, but is not limited to, single-factorial, multi-factorial, and fractional ANOVA and Design for Six Sigma.
    
Prerequisite: TMFG 265.

426 Research and Development in Plastics (3)
Development of research started in TMFG 425. Includes aspects of materials, processing, quality, DOE, materials testing, literature searches/review, and others. Capstone course. Extensive laboratory work required.
    
Prerequisite: TMFG 340, 425.

460 Projects in Computer-Aided Manufacturing 1 (3)
This is the first course of a two-semester sequence of senior capstone. Encompasses the design of product, the selection of raw materials, and the sequence of manufacturing processing techniques. The course emphasizes teamwork, project management, testing through simulation or prototype, and oral and written communications.
    
Prerequisite: senior standing.

463 Manufacturing Planning and Controls (3)
 Emphasizes quantitative techniques for manufacturing planning and control. Topics include forecasting techniques, capital equipment justification, production and inventory planning and scheduling (MRP/JIT), and project planning and control (CPM/PERT). Weekly laboratory scheduled.
    
Prerequisite: MATH 162; TMFG 301.

469 Six Sigma Project 2 (3)
A paid or unpaid work and learning experience where students will be required to complete the Six Sigma project started in TMFG 465. Student will be required to prepare a full project report. Student will spend a significant amount of time working with a community partner.
    
Prerequisite: ISOM 475; permission of the department chairperson.

473 Projects in Computer-Aided Manufacturing 2 (3)
This is a continuation of TMFG 460. It includes CNC, CAD, CAM, robotics, and other computer-based technology in manufacturing systems. Extensive laboratory work required.
    
Prerequisite: TMFG 460.

495 Green Prototyping and Upcycling (3)
Students use recycling, 3D printing, and lasers to design environmentally 
sustainable products.
    Not open to students who have credit in TMFG 595.