• Most students can work 10 to 15 hours a week and still maintain satisfactory academic records if they budget their time wisely.
  • Request candidates bring their schedules to the interview and review schedules with your student employees at the beginning of each term so that you can insure your staffing needs are addressed.

  • For the most efficient use of working time, students should work in blocks consisting of at least 2 hours.

  • When the university is in session during the academic year, student employees may work up to 20 hours a week and no more than 40 hours during a two-week pay period.

  • Student employees who work four hours consecutively are entitled to a fifteen-minute break period. Break periods may not be used to cover late arrivals or early departures from work, and they may not be accumulated.

  • Although students may have more than one campus job, they may not work more than a total of 20 hours a week during the academic year. Keep this in mind when you plan their schedules. It is incumbent upon your student employees to monitor their hours for compliance.

  • Students may be eligible to work during breaks for more than 20 hours a week, not to exceed 8 hours a day. Social Security taxes will be withheld if students are working but not attending classes during a pay period.

  • Students may work up to 40 hours a week in the summer (or 80 hours during a two-week pay period) regardless of the number of hours they are enrolled.

  • Graduate Assistants that worked 20 hours or less during the academic year may work up to 40 hours a week in the fall, winter, spring and summer breaks.  If a Graduate Assistant has worked between 21 to 29 hours a week during the academic year, the Graduate Assistant cannot work more than 29 hours a week during the fall, winter, spring and/or summer breaks.

  • According to university policy, students may never work more than 40 hours a week, so never schedule them to work overtime.

  • Student employees are part-time employees and are not paid for lunch hours, holidays on which they do not work, etc.

  • Students who have been awarded Federal Work Study are limited in the amount of money they may earn under the work-study program. Although every attempt will be made to alert the student’s supervisor when the award is nearly exhausted, the student’s supervisor must keep an accurate record of students' earnings and each student's earnings limit.

  • The Federal Work Study award consists of the federal government’s 75% contribution and the employing department’s 25% contribution (e.g.: FWS Award = $2000; $1500 federal + $500 employer contributions). Students who have been awarded work-study money can continue to work if the employing unit pays 100 percent of the wages earned beyond that limit.  If funds are available, the student may inquire solicit the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships, LU-245, to see if he, or she, qualifies for additional funding.

  • University positions which are not FWS dependent will revert to 100% departmental compensation upon the exhaustion of the FWS award.  The department should make the determination if it wants to maintain the student at 100% or end the student’s assignment.

  • Supervisors can request a report from the Office of Payroll and Employee Benefits that includes the work-study student's total earnings along with the current balance of their Federal Work Study earnings.

International students are restricted to 20 hours a week if they are taking classes. If they are not enrolled for classes during summer, they may work up to 40 hours a week providing they meet all other eligibility requirements.